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AG88导航网【ag88.shop】凯时在线平台 pCkrUGYfEnvir【onmen】t/al group WWF h】as accused Hungarian authori【ties of ille\gally】 cu/tting down a forest protected by the /Eu】ropean Union.Last month\,】 Hungary's Nation【a/l Water D】irectorate f/elled a\n old flo】od pl】ain fo/rest in a pr\otected are】a【【 along/【 the T\isza River near T\iszaug, a village som【e 120 kilometres south-east of B】uda/pest.Parts of the area /ar\e pr【o\tected by the EU as a Natura 2000 /site for provi\ding a】 c\or】e breeding and resting place to rare and threatened spec】【ies including black s】torks.Accord】ing to the WWF/, flood pl\ain forests &m【d/a【sh/; an area of l】and near the】 banks of a river 【p【rone to floodin/g &/mdas】h; \ar】e amon\/g the most 【endange/red habitat in Hungary with their s\urface having 】shrunk t/o less than 1% of what it was before/ river regulatio/ns came into force.T\he【 NGO bla/sted the c\ountry's floo\d manag【emen/t practices 【as "unsustainable". It arg】ued /that in many 【previous instances, the felling【【 of trees to redu【ce flooding had not/ been ca\rried out to pr】otect human life and set/tlement, but\ "to prote】ct 】】poor/-qu】ality l【a【nd" /ins】t\ead\ and with little r【egar】d to nature and \wildli【fe【.The group【 said 】【that acro/ss the Ti\sza River Basin, "the 】wil/d【erness】 now resemb//les Mordor"."A large 】part of the \flood plain forest】s and \wetla/\nds have been conf\】【ine/d to riverside emb/ankments, and agricultural areas/ have mainly replaced thes\e form【er large 】floodplains【," Peter Kajner, from WWF Hungary Liv【e R】ivers pro/gr\a】mme】, s/aid.The/ N【GO accused t【he 【National Water Directorate o【f having carried out the felling【 without the proper authorisations and called for st【atutory penalties to be i】m\posed.Th【e National/ Water D】irec\torate ref】ute【d WWF's\ a/llegati【on t】hat the cutti\ng】\ was illegal, writing in a statement that it ha】d follow】ed ministerial dec】re/es and\ secured authorisation from】 t\he local county go】】vernment.It ad/ded t【ha】t cutting do\wn mature t】【rees is an establi//sh【ed p\o】lic】y to reju/venate forests and that it was carri/ed out in January to 】not disturb/ the re【p【roducti\ve period of the rare species w【ho \ca/ll t\he area home.Sha/】re this ar】ticl/eShareTw】eetSharesendShareTwee/tSh【aresen\dMoreHideSha/reSendS\hareS/【hareS/hare/SendShareShareYou m】ight also like \ \ / 】 \ 【 Sziget music festiv/】al in H】ung/】ary showcases its【 green credent】ials / \ R/omania&/#039;s vir/gin forests rava/ged by /】9;wood maf/ia'\ 】 / 【 \ \ 【 【 EU】's young/est c\ommissioner on how to turn climate c【risis ar\ound 【 / More abou】tEnvironmental pr【o【tecti\onFores【tsHungar\y B/rowse t/oda】y's ta\gsh3va

5tXWTe】xt size【A/aAaA【 group of British women ar【e set to\ prove th/\at in t\he【 UK, where the economy once has be/en s【haped by the textile】 i\ndustry/, it is s【till commercially viable to re\-【crea/te a l【ocal, r【esilient texti】l\e economy. They a【im to offer an】 al【ternat】ive to/ th】e \u【nsustainable global textile produc\ti【on s】ystems which /hav】e threatened /traditional British cloths almost to /exti】nction.The project takes place】, of cours\e, in Bristol the UK’【s greene\st city, the European Green Capital in/ 2015. I】n tha\t year the loca/l weav】in\g mill start\ed operating, it was the firs】t /industr】ial\ loo】m to open in the ci【t\y in almost a century.\ Th\is m【ill has be/】com\e part of /the Bristol Cloth proj/e】ct, a fabric manufacture】r to produce the UK's\ first rege\nera【tive/ non-toxic tex】tile."The】 f\arm 【we source the wo\o/l from - Fernhill fa【rm 】- uses “holistic farm\in\g&rdqu\o; techniques, it means mimick】ing natural \herd \grazing\ pattern【s," explai\ns【 the bac】k【ground \B\ab/s Beha\【n, the F【【oun/ding Director of Bri】stol Cloth project &a【mp】; Botanic【al 】Inks. "Lots of /animals】 ar【e kept together in one area 】putting lots \o/f 【nutri【/e【nts back into the soil. 】T【hey are however moved o\n quickly s【【o always have fresh new pasture to 【graze\ on. The pl\ants in th【e soil get a long time until t】h\e\ /herd 【ret】urn/ to that place. Meaning\ tha】【t a diverse speci\es\ of \pl【ants get【 to grow - all putting a varie/ty of nu/trients an\d mine【rals into the soil【. And they get【 to grow tall and /therefore also\ get deep roots,【 and t】hi】s is what makes them】 able to capture more/ car\bon from t】he air and lock it back into the soi\l- this is wh】at makes i】/t carb/on sequestering and climate neutralising."Anot\【he】r important part of 】th/e proc】ess i\s using natural m】ater\ia/ls for the colouring, such/ as plants, minerals and in【sect\s. \(A/ro/und the world,】 \an estimate【d 17 t/o 20% of industrial water】 pollution comes fro\m textile dyeing and treatment an【d an est】imated 8】,000 synthetic chemic【als are us/ed to turn raw mat/erials into 【\te【x/tiles, many /o/f which will be releas/ed into f】re/shwater sourc\es.)【As the clo/th is made from natural fibre and plant\ 】d】\yes and no toxic synthetic c】/h【emica/ls, i\t is safe 】t/o go back i】n/to the ground after i\t’s u】sef/ul life cycle and actually o/\】ffer nutrients back/ to// the soil.The project has r/aised more than £12,】000【 v\ia a crowdfunding ca/mp】aign to produce the first 200 metres of the Bristol 【Cloth/.\】Cli/ck on the/】 video above to lear\n more about /the proje】ct.Share th】is article 【 Mor\e from styleSuCd

xYUHIt【】 sits o\ff the coast of Nor】mandy,【 l【ooking like 】a f\airytale castle flo/ating on】 the water.】But for years, the Mont/ Saint Michel ha】s lost a part of its \mysterious solitude【, due t\o an accumulation of /】silt at the island's base.The concret】e causeway\ that conn\ected the island to the ma【inla】\nd pre\/v/ented the wa\te\】r /from flowly /fre】ely aro【und its base.But, no】w 】the sit】e ha\s begun to reclaim its island-like appearance during cert/a【in high tides.\Research on the proje】c\t start\ed in 1995, an【d continued /for more than/ 10 years.】 It then took another 10 year/s to complete th\e majo/r structural/ changes.\【Mar\ie-Agnés Po\ussi/er-Winsb/ack/, Vice-Presi/dent \of Normandy Regional【 【【Council【, said: "【T/hes\e works had【 two aims. First【ly【, to make sure 】that the island/ /coul/d, once a】gain, b\e what it 【wa【s duri】ng previous 【centuries, that is, surro【】unded by the sea and not s\an【d and silt. And second】ly, 【to\ improve\ the】 way we /ma/nage touri【sm."The \main work undertak】en w】as the remov\al of the\ concr/ete causeway. I/t】 was replaced/ with a brid】ge on stilts, the/refore allowi\ng water【 】to trav【el un】derneath it. It conn\ects to an area of solid gr【/ound that becomes sub/mer\g\ed dur/ing high \tide.Th\e o//ld dam o\n the Co【u/e【snon【 w/\as al【so 【d\emol】i\s【hed, and replaced wi\th /a\ new eig/h【t-gated structure that reg【ulates the 【flow between 】the river 】and the sea, which meet in t/h】e ba/y】.Romai】n D/esgu&e】acute;e, who【】 manages the ne】w d【am, explained to E\urone/ws how it works】."The 】old dam was th\ere to limit floodi\ng 】and mar/ine \flooding. The n】ew dam obvi/ously continues to do so, bu】】t it will regen【erate t/he hydro\logi\cal curren\t in the r【iver to erode the sediment. This will【 rem【ove \the sand t【hat accumulated at the 】base of Mont S】aint M】ichel," \he said.To complete th】is facelift, the car parks at t【he/ foot of the island【 h\ave been\ remo/ved, and it can no/w only be reached by a】 free shuttle bus, horse-drawn/ c【ar【riage, or by foot.More t】han 2.5/ m】illion tourists visit the World He/ritage Site every year, but the】 new 【c【hanges m/【e】an that tou【】r】 guid】es【 have had to adap\t.H【ug】o Poulet, a /gu【ide /】【for Les C】he\min\s de la】 Baie, vis\its the bay【 several 【times a da\y with groups of tourists. He /said that \the structural ch\anges have ha/】】d\ an e【ffect on his wor【k."Since the w\orks hav】e finishe【d, the ground leve】l has drop【ped, 【the sea is moving【 faste\r and no\w 【we \have 】the Cu\esnon pa【ss【ing on 】e/a/\ch side. \We do shorter outing【s, we adapt to\ th【e sea and we manage to 】juggle】\ tha】t,"【 he 【said.The project cost a total of /&【euro;184 mi【llion. Of th】at, €85 million was funded by the Fre\nch government, and €21.5 million was financed by the EU's cohesi】on 【pol/icy,】 w\hich took charge of part of the co/nst\ruction of the dam and its hydraulics.1212121212121212Share this articleCopy/past\e the article video embed l\ink below:CopyShareTweetShare\sendShareTweetS】haresendMoreHideShareSendSh】areShareShareSendShareSh/areMore aboutMont-Saint-MichelEnvironmen/tal protectionTou】rismFrance【 \ 【 \Browse today/9;s tagslq5d791M

mBegText sizeAaAaMagda【le\na【 Herrera, director of pho】\tog/raphy at】 G/EO】 magazine, has a 【weal】th of exper【ienc【e in t\【he wor\ld o\/f photography and journalism, an/d a keen eye for an am【\azin\g image. /This made h/e/r id【eally place【d for her a【ppoin/tment as a judge for】\ th【e 2019 Eu\r【op】ean Wildlife Photographer o】f the Y\ear】./The competition, run annually b\y the So】ciety of German Nature Photographers and now\】 in its 19th year, challenges profession\al and no/n【-professional photo【graphers】 alike to 【provide th】e bes/t photograp/hy Europe has to offer/.Herrera too【k/ some time【 to talk t\o us ab】out the com/petition, what to exp】ec/t,【 and how photographers, a【s well as providin\g b\reathta【【kin【g image\s,】 can help drive positive engage\ment w//【ith t\he envir】onment.【Congratu\/lation】s on your ap【po】intment\ to t\he judging pa\nel for the GDT European Nature photographer of t】he Year 2019. How did you beco】me involved wit【h th】】is 【\co\mpe】tition】?&ldqu\o;I t】】hin/k some of the p】hotographers I wo/r/k\ with\ at Geo ha/ve】 s【uggest【ed that I partic】ipa】te. Geo is a magazine that 【is concer】ned with the 【en/vir/onment, nature /a【nd\ wildlife con【serva\tion.&rdquo\;Salvad】or Colvee【, Nebot Der/ Tanz 】D【es Okt【o【pus】W】hy 】do 】yo\u thin/k competitions such/ as this a\re i】mportant?“N】/【a】tu\re a】nd wildlife ph【otography is becoming increasingly po\pular. P【ho【tographers 【are our am/bassador\s an\d our eyes an\d these e】vents allow u】s 【to make the object of t【heir w/o/rk known/ to the widest possible 【au\dience. Tod/ay, it i】s/ important to highligh【t the natural beauty o/f o【ur pl/anet but /also t】/he dang\ers. /It/'s not just about beautifu\l p\ic/【ture】s.”H】ave you seen /many of the entries 】yet? What i/s the standard lik】e so far?“As far as I【 can se】e the standard is high!”Is】 there an【ything in particular you’】r【e hoping to s/ee in this year’s 【entri/es?“I hope /】to see, as wit\h any photo, something that sho/ws com/plexity or tension, behaviour, activity a\nd threat too.&rdqu/o;Is there a cat【egory that you particula\rly appreciat\e or enjoy?“I have to say, I love all of the】m\ \but I am 】part【icularly intere】sted in the 】K7 \one (the one that focuses o】n the beneficial or】 n【\egative rel【ationsh】ip /bet【ween humans /and nature).【Cristobal【 Serran\o, Der PoolWhy do/ you /th【i/nk it is \important 】for the competition to exp【lore this particul【ar topic?“It is important not t【o separate /the animal fro\m the human and to sh/ow th【【is relations】hi】p, which\ can /be de】structive (o\n\ the part of humans). W【e share a p【lanet where everyone must find t【heir 【place.&rdqu【o;To what ex/tent is nature photo\graphy a\ble to re/flect on the【 efforts of c\onservation 】a】nd/or reveal\ what/ more nee【ds to be done?】 Wha/t【 are its limi\ta】tions?“Nature photogr\ap/hy sho/ws us 【an ov【e】rview of the situati【on, s】/ometimes in a very aesthetic form, but in recent【 years/ it has evolved 【into\ a photography t\hat r/evea】ls【 a context \that, 【like any】 documen/tary photography, explores th】e re/lations/hip of the living to a territ//ory. In this se】nse/, it s】trongly【 concerns us all.”/W/ords: Dan【ny \McCanceHeader: Joel Brunet, Ein /Gemaelde d【es LebensShare this artic\le 【 More fr【om placessdl0

670cIt【】 sits o\ff the coast of Nor】mandy,【 l【ooking like 】a f\airytale castle flo/ating on】 the water.】But for years, the Mont/ Saint Michel ha】s lost a part of its \mysterious solitude【, due t\o an accumulation of /】silt at the island's base.The concret】e causeway\ that conn\ected the island to the ma【inla】\nd pre\/v/ented the wa\te\】r /from flowly /fre】ely aro【und its base.But, no】w 】the sit】e ha\s begun to reclaim its island-like appearance during cert/a【in high tides.\Research on the proje】c\t start\ed in 1995, an【d continued /for more than/ 10 years.】 It then took another 10 year/s to complete th\e majo/r structural/ changes.\【Mar\ie-Agnés Po\ussi/er-Winsb/ack/, Vice-Presi/dent \of Normandy Regional【 【【Council【, said: "【T/hes\e works had【 two aims. First【ly【, to make sure 】that the island/ /coul/d, once a】gain, b\e what it 【wa【s duri】ng previous 【centuries, that is, surro【】unded by the sea and not s\an【d and silt. And second】ly, 【to\ improve\ the】 way we /ma/nage touri【sm."The \main work undertak】en w】as the remov\al of the\ concr/ete causeway. I/t】 was replaced/ with a brid】ge on stilts, the/refore allowi\ng water【 】to trav【el un】derneath it. It conn\ects to an area of solid gr【/ound that becomes sub/mer\g\ed dur/ing high \tide.Th\e o//ld dam o\n the Co【u/e【snon【 w/\as al【so 【d\emol】i\s【hed, and replaced wi\th /a\ new eig/h【t-gated structure that reg【ulates the 【flow between 】the river 】and the sea, which meet in t/h】e ba/y】.Romai】n D/esgu&e】acute;e, who【】 manages the ne】w d【am, explained to E\urone/ws how it works】."The 】old dam was th\ere to limit floodi\ng 】and mar/ine \flooding. The n】ew dam obvi/ously continues to do so, bu】】t it will regen【erate t/he hydro\logi\cal curren\t in the r【iver to erode the sediment. This will【 rem【ove \the sand t【hat accumulated at the 】base of Mont S】aint M】ichel," \he said.To complete th】is facelift, the car parks at t【he/ foot of the island【 h\ave been\ remo/ved, and it can no/w only be reached by a】 free shuttle bus, horse-drawn/ c【ar【riage, or by foot.More t】han 2.5/ m】illion tourists visit the World He/ritage Site every year, but the】 new 【c【hanges m/【e】an that tou【】r】 guid】es【 have had to adap\t.H【ug】o Poulet, a /gu【ide /】【for Les C】he\min\s de la】 Baie, vis\its the bay【 several 【times a da\y with groups of tourists. He /said that \the structural ch\anges have ha/】】d\ an e【ffect on his wor【k."Since the w\orks hav】e finishe【d, the ground leve】l has drop【ped, 【the sea is moving【 faste\r and no\w 【we \have 】the Cu\esnon pa【ss【ing on 】e/a/\ch side. \We do shorter outing【s, we adapt to\ th【e sea and we manage to 】juggle】\ tha】t,"【 he 【said.The project cost a total of /&【euro;184 mi【llion. Of th】at, €85 million was funded by the Fre\nch government, and €21.5 million was financed by the EU's cohesi】on 【pol/icy,】 w\hich took charge of part of the co/nst\ruction of the dam and its hydraulics.1212121212121212Share this articleCopy/past\e the article video embed l\ink below:CopyShareTweetShare\sendShareTweetS】haresendMoreHideShareSendSh】areShareShareSendShareSh/areMore aboutMont-Saint-MichelEnvironmen/tal protectionTou】rismFrance【 \ 【 \Browse today/9;s tagsQxYI

HAMfWa】t/ch: Iceland's meltin/g \Vatna/jökull Nat\ional Park fights for/ Wor】【ld\ Heritage Statu】s【8HMK

T/ext siz【eAaAaTakin【g you on a jou【rne】y ac\ross t/he Yorksh/ire Dales an【d all【/ the way\ to Vanco【uver Is【land, Kate Fletcher&/【rsquo;s "Wild Dress" is an autob】iographica】l me】ander through the tende/r mom【ents wher/e clothing ha\s made her f/e【el 【embedde】d in nature. A Professor o【f su】stainability, design and【 fashi】on at the U\niversity of the Arts Lond/】o\/n; Fletch【er【 h\as】 been /a】t t】\he forefront of 【the\ c】/all for s\/ystematic change in /the fas【hion /industr【y.\ In her 【first col】lection of person【al writin】gs, \】Fletcher】 ha/s chosen t/o explore the complex and often art】ificially detached re】la/【t\ionship between the natur【al world a/nd/ what 【we\ wear.Fle/tcher looks at clothing as/ something m\ore e/ssential and far 【beyond its /si】mple【, modern, role as/ a dis】posabl【e commodity. It’s \no【t difficult to see that our c【ultural relationship with clothing has been【 】distorted by years of f/ast-movin【g/ \mo【de】rn /fashio】n t】rends but as she recou】nts the story of her【 【dad&rsquo/;s favourite jumper, there is a glimmer of some nostalgic, int】ergen/er【ational import\ance that breaks through/. Mending this dec【ade/】s-old piece of clothin/g using wool found 】in hedgerows and on fences she mus\es about this as a/ rebellious /act. “As I worked my lap felt w/arm,” she writes【, “Doing this felt like a way to live not】 j/u】st through the rules of 【modern society.&rdqu\o;Ch/arlie M\ee/chamIt’【s not just abo/ut rebell【ing \for the sake of reduci/ng w【ast/e, 】however. Fletcher rec】o【gnizes the】【 way t/hat modern out】do\or clothing i【mpos【es a kind of】 distance from the natural \world.【 The 】clothing we ch\/oose to wear becomes a divisio【n; 】farmworker vs lando【wner, recr\eatio/nal h/iker vs those \who work the land. A ne【ed for\ spe】/ci】fi【c, tec【h】no\log】ically advanced outdoor gear in b\right neon oil-based mat】erials 【is, Fletcher says, ju\st another in/dicat\ion of rampant cons\um\er \cult/ure.Th/e art installati【on teac】hing us to c【are for our/ forestsLivin/g Recomm【ends | A/ "vital tool】"\ for fighting the rising tide of si】ngle/ use plasticsL】\ivin【g Recommends 】| /No/ one is too s】mall to 【make a d【iffer】enceIt’s\ a v【ery d/\】i/fferent way to int【【roduce this/ message. Distan/t from the usual ev/ils of fast fa】sh/ion’s rapidly evolving aesthetics, she e】xp/lores the im\prac/tic/ali【ty of the always new in【 the/ face o/f the a\n】ci\ent /forces of the elements. Fletcher is【n’t preaching about all of the usual】 sust【ainab】le fa】/shion clichés but instead inviting you to think differently about how you\r/ garments can bring y】ou joy. T\he thrill o【f newness is fleeting 【but\ rich cultural relat\】】io】nships can and will【 last 【a lif//e\【time.Jack Gr\angeShunning the newness\ of n\/eoprene allows you to embrace /a\ more per/me\able【 exterior【. &/ldquo】;Once we\/&【rsquo;re there, we learn from the land and listen\ to the voic/es /of the b\irds and the \rain,” she writes, “We /give attentio】n to the unta【med parts of our【 world, in【】clud/ing that 【part in ourselves. [...] And this】 requires,】 at the least, that we make the \la】yers\ that【 \we build up 】ar【ound ourselves&【\mdash; some of wh】ich 】ar】e【 fashio【n in cloth—more permeable.&rdqu】o; Our clothing does\n&rsquo】;t alway】s have to /fo【rm】 a bar】】r【ier \between th】e inside and t】he outside, sometimes, whe】n your /&ldquo\;co】at&\rsquo;s wide sleeves grip\ onto\ t/h/\e lip o】f a gust&rdquo【】;】 o】r/ your &ldq】uo;trousers, wide-】legged act as a kite&rdq】u/o; it can \help you form \a connecti/on 】with na【tu/re.Kate Fletch/【er's Wi】ld Dress: Clothing a\nd the】 natural world is av\ailable from Uniformbooks, more \informatio】n can be fou\nd here.Share this articl/e M/ore 【from\ life

XsN5Nigerian women revolutionising Fine Art 【Rpsd

RwkkCreating music f【rom garbagezvAV

TaXJTourism set to bl\oom in Angola’s desert regionyW1g

6oleThe Ol\d Port, Mars】eille\’s popular wa】terfro/nt, h\ides a dirty secret.Electric scooter【s, tires a【nd pla】s】tic bottles litter 【【the seafloor.Annual clean-up operationEver【/y 】【ye】ar, volunte/e/rs gat/her/ to clean up some of /the mess. Hundreds of scuba divers collect th/e \rubbish, whic】h is t【h/en【 sor\ted\ an【】d rec\ycled, or otherwise safely dispose/d】 of,【 by 】l】oc\al activists.&ldqu】o;We find a 【lot of【 scooters, ra【i【ling【s, cans, bottle【s,” says Angie Espine【l Caño【n, 】a volun【\t/eer with// Team 13. &ld【quo;The goal【 i【sn&rsqu/o;t just to clean up, it&rs/quo;s also to 】ra】】ise awareness】.&r/dquo;“Last year, we recover【ed 91【m3 /of \waste,” s/ays I\sabelle P/oi】tou/, anoth】er volunt【eer f】】rom the Merterre Associa/tio\n. “The year【 before it】 was 13】1m3, so \that’s a decrease of 40m/3. This/ year, j【udging \from what I c/an s【ee】 and my experience, \I’d say it&rsquo】;s les\s again."We fin】d a lot /of scooters, rail/ings, \cans and bot/tles. The goal isn’t just to clean up, it【’s also to raise awareness. 【 Angie Espinel Cañ/【on / Vo【luntee】r, Team 13 】 With smu\rfs 】for ma】scots, the\ event】 i【s】 a part of the "EU Be】ach Cleanup" campaign -\ h【elping to raise aw//areness of the Europe/an response /to th】e\ marine p】ol【lut/【i【on pro\blem【. One o/f【 the divers is Alai\n Dumor/t — 【the EU’s representa/tive in Mars/eille.“Some 】waste is potentially 】recyclable,&rd/quo; says Dum\ort【. “But 【unfortu\nately 【【not/ sin\【gle-use objects, which go strai\ght in the bi/n. That's why from 2021 the /EU /will 】be banni\】n/g all this kind of single\-use utensils &\mdash; pla】tes, s】tir【rers, cotton bu【ds, /and so on - all the things yo/u fr【】equently find on be】ac】】he\s will be banned.”Mos】t ocean waste co/mes from urban areasAn imp\ortant aspect of the campaign is public outre/ach. Mi】【llions 】of tons of/ waste - mostly coming from u/rban are\a】【s - 】en】d /up in \the ocean 】every/ yea\/r】/.】 It’s been calc\ulated that on every square】 mile /of ocean, thous【ands of piec】es o\f rubbish \are floating./“The fig\ures【 【show that【 80% of marine li\tter originates on land,” ex\pl】ains Olivier Bianchimani/, th】e dir】ector of Septentri\on 】Environneme\nt. “It'【s eithe【r w/ashed away【 by 】/rivers or dis【carded/ d【irectl】y into/ the sea. As you can imagi\ne, it wasn't wind that brough】t r/ailings and bicycles /here.”At \over 【7【0 beach cle】an\up eve【nts organised t\his year b【y the EU a【nd the UN, almost 40 /000\ participants collect\ed ar】ound 】850 ton/s of waste &md\ash; from Camb【/odia to Haiti - and Argenti/】na to】 No【rway.The】 figu/】res show 】\】that 80% of ma/【rin\e litter ori】ginates【 on la/nd. 【 【 【 【Ol【ivier Bianchimani 【 【 Director, Septent】r/ion】 Environnement 【 &ldqu】\o/;This needs to be s/een i/n a【 much broade\r c【ontex】t,&rdq【uo; says Dumort. \&ldqu\o;Ot】herwi【se t\】his would be a loca【l event,【 and you’d be asking \wha\t's】 Europe go【t to do with it. Europe's involved/ precisely because this is a globa】l problem, and 】requi】res a whole s/eries 】o】f a/ct/ions and laws a】t an i】nternational l\/e】v】el.”The Euro/pean Union is\ leading the globa】l 】fight \aga/inst marine li】tter.【 Be//sides its 【policies curbing single-use p\【lastics【 and re/ducing waste from lost fishing gear, the /EU has earmark】/ed\ €350 million for research an【d deve【lopment.Mini-cata】maran scoops】 debris from t\he wa】ter\One/ of the EU-supported tec/hnologies is WasteSha【rk,【 devel【oped in Rotterd】am. A re\motely contr\olled 【m【in\i-catamara】n removes plastics /and othe【r floating deb【ris from【】 the surface of t/he water. Its sen【sors can monito【r pollution levels and \other environmental indi\cator】s. It's electri\call/y powered, emission-\free and ca\n collect hundreds of】 kilos of rubbish/\ at a time.“What we'/re】 trying to do is 】create a \small /enough vessel that will 【get into ti】ght spaces w\here waste col\lect\s, particularly in ha/【rbours and ports, and s/top all【 that waste bei【ng taken out into the greater ocean," says Richard Ha【rdiman, the 【founder on Ranmarine T\echn】ologi/es, the startup behi】nd WasteShark.【The bas】ic function of the WasteShar【/k is very simple. But \ins】ide, it【's a】lways changing &mdash】; 【we【're al【ways trying to make it lighter, mo\re eff/icient/, ea】s\ier to do maintenance on. \ /T】\essa Despinic \ 【 / WasteS【hark】 Design Engineer \ 【 】 / \Ranmarine alrea【d【y has c】us】t\omers in s\everal countries. Enginee【rs ar【e workin\g to make the d\evice\ ful【ly auto\nomous — so it】 can\ c】ollect litter and br\ing 】it back t/o the /recharging station /wi【t【h the need for a pilot.“The】】 basi】c \【【fun【ction】 】of the Wast\eShark is very simple,” says 】d】esi/gn engineer Tess\a Despinic. 】&ldq【uo;It just s】wi】m\s around and collec\t\s【 【tras【h from the su】rface. B【u\/t inside, it's alwa\ys chang/【ing — we're【 \always trying to mak//e it 】\lighter, more effic】ient, easie】r to 】do maintenance\ on. And we're also【 building a\n a【utonomous version t/hat will swim \aroun】d according】 to/ waypo/ints that yo\u give it. So w【e're a\lways wor【king on th】at and】 maki】ng it better.】"I\n the near future\, the de/velop/e】【rs envisage swarms 【of their rob【ots \picking up floa/】ting rubbi/【sh.“I have\ /a】 vision in my hea【【d that keeps m\e】 going,” says Hard/iman. “Tha/t is what we'd be sitt/ing in a\ c\ontrol room an】d from our site, we could see whe】re e/very drone is acros【s th\e planet, how many are【 operating, how 【/much waste is bei\】ng caught — an/d actually see the real impact 】of 】that these things are ma【king around the wor】ld."Technical s【【olutions an】d clean-up campaigns are important. But the simple way】 to keep our se【as】 \hea】lt【hier is to\ drop less litter — a】】nd】 tha【t’s】 a lesson for childre\n and/ adults alike.121212121Share\ t/his articleCopy/past】e the a】rticle v\】id】eo 【embe【d li】nk below:CopyShareT/weetSharesendS/har【/】eTweetSharesendMo/reHideShareSendShareSha/reShareSendShareShareYou migh】t also like \ / 】 Wha/t/’s killing/ ou\r und】erwater ecosystems? / 【 Mor\e 【abo\【utContamination of wate【rEnvironmen\tal prote】ctionSea Most viewe/d 】 \ 】 W\hat influence on \climate is 】the coron/avirus】【 】\lockdown really having? 】 【 【 \ The new AI system saf/egu】/【arding pre/mature /babi】es\ from infect\io\n 】【 Messenger/ RNA: 【the mo/【lecule that may teach our bodies to beat c/ancer 【 】 / \ 【【 【 【 Apple a】】nd Google /say they\'ll wor\k toge\ther to trace spread of cor】onaviru】s vi\【a smartphones / Ho/w EU fundin/g is ch\anging the f/ace of Lat】vian innova/ti/on / Brow【se today's ta/gsVYOT

qCyi“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207Tex\【t size\AaAaIn a historic \m】ove for the/ /east A/frican nation, Ethio【p【ia 】has this】 week announced a tree-p/lan】ting/ initia【tive, vi】a/ UN Environment, to outd\o vir【t/ual】ly any/ ot\he【r country in the world. Based /initially at the Gu】le/le Botanical Garden in the capital of Ad/dis Ababa, volunte/ers \be\gan pla】nting 350 million tr\ees 】spanning r\ight across the country. In\ just /12 hours, the world record was broken, in an \ad】m/irable attempt to combat the effects of】 de\fo】restatio】n a/nd cli】【】mate change. By fu【】l/fill\/in【g\ the tree-plantin/g re】cord,/ th【e】 c】ountry is surpassing i/ts Green Legacy goal, 【conceived by Eth】io】】pian】 Pr/ime Minister/ A\】b】iy Ahmed, o/f pla\/nting 2Five new ways to help the env【ironment million tr】ees\ in a day【 at over 1,】000 sites.The /l/ast country \to attempt【 su【c\h a feat was India, who have been reigning\ cha/mpi【on】s since 1 when they planted 49.3 million trees in\ just one【 day, invo【lving 800,000 vo】lunt【eers. Equally, back【 in/ /2018, China announced plans to 【plan\t forests c\overing an area rou【ghly the size of /Ireland and the UK, one of the least\ forested countries】 in Europe \(13% according t【o /Forest R【esearch), spent 】£.7 million to develop a new north】【ern forest 【】in 20【【18. Co\uld the trend o/】f countries competing /\to plant the mo/st saplings be catching on?】E/thiopia's Prime Min/ister Abiy A【hm/ed, A/ugus\t 2019ReutersThe United /Nations En【】vi】ronment】, al\o】\ng with ot\her international organisati【ons, all backe\d the initiati】ve, believing firmly in the /power of tree rest】oration\ in //helpi\n】g to a/bsorb carbon dioxid】e, a m/ajor propell】er\ of global heati\ng./What is Aff【ore【station and /why does it】 help the p】lanet?Tr\ee-planting is called 】afforestation, quite\ simply, the op】posite】 o【【f deforestation. Many studies, 】including o【ne conducted by A/】merica/n scientific journ【al PNAS in 2017\, hav\e document【【\ed /that restoring forest\s in】 their natural f】or\ms is】 \one of, if not the s【in】gle mos】t, efficient an【swer to】 improving global wa\rming.Acco】rdin/g to the UN, f】orest \coverage in Ethiopia has d/eclined drastically since the/ start of the century, reaching a \l】ow of just 4% i】n the early\ 2000s【, /as opposed to 35% 【100 years ago. So, ac/tion had to be take】n to improve 】the /leve\l \of 【e/missions in the atmosph【ere, i/n the】 form of this ambitious】 task.Wh【at h\appen\s is, /trees and vege\tatio\n absorb t\he excess carbon dioxid】e \】we emi\t due \to human a\ctiv【ity with fossil fuel】s,\ meani】n\】g tha\t th\e CO2 c\an be st【ored, and the heat absorbed. In this way, the he\ating of t【he planet【 is lessened and, in turn, the tr【ees he/lp to preserve /the ec【osystems be/neath th/em/【\ and ensure si/gnificant e】nvironme】nta【l benefits/ as a who\le. F/or \instance, en\c/ou\raging rainfall, pr\oviding clean water, r】edu【ci/ng air pol【lution,】 and impr/ov】ing the livelihoods for local peopl\e in s/urr】ounding areas.Nature\ Va【lley\, AfricaJuliette B【iao Koudenoukpo,\ Dir【ector of UN\ Environment&rsq】uo;s Africa Office explain/【s in an official statemen/t:&\ldquo;Afforestation is t\he most ef\fective climate cha】nge 】solution to date a\nd with the ne/w record set by Ethiopia, other African na】\tio】ns should move with speed and chal\lenge the status quo.&【rdquo;“Africa has what 【it take/s to spearhead thi\s glo【bal pu/sh and as the most affected and v【ulnerable c\ontinent, \clim【ate cha/nge miti/gation must 】be \the\ \t/opmost pr/io】rity in the comi【ng da】ys. We at【 UN Environment are taking the lead\ in helping to build capacity 【for\ nations and people to 】ap【ply/ /th\emselves to afforestation and climate chang/\e mitigation strategies.”353,633,6/60 Tree Seedlings Pl】an/ted in 【12 Hours. This【 is/【 i/n /【#Ethiop\iansRegional Shares of T】rees Pla\nted toda\y.#P】MOEthiopi/a#Green】LegacyEthiopiapic.twitter.co】m/2BkTD/tYedC&mdas//h; D【r.-Ing.【 Geta\hun Mekuria (@DrGetahun) July 29, 2019Ultimate\ly, t/he goa\l is f\or 4 b\illion【】 ind】igenous trees to be planted /acr/o/\ss the dr/o】ught-prone nation, rep\orts the BBC, w/hich will make 【an en\ormous difference to t【he】 stability of the【 climate.Share this article More from pla】ces 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsRGmJ

dwT2In Pic】tu【res:】 Deforestation in Brazil's rainforest\【 】【is close to five time/s the size of Lon\don\I4yB

5wuTH【ow c【ompanies across Eur【ope are c/reating sustainabl【e produ/cts\ using \no /fos】sil f】u】\elssMaO

amTWWatch back: 【Greta T\】hunber\g says /she/】9;s not nervous a/s she gets ready for America【s tripkHP1

uo9mScienti【st】s es【ti【mate that roughly 】on/e million la\n/d and\ marin【e species may】 bec【ome extinct in the foreseeab/le f\uture. Many within】 decades. What are the main【 reasons for th/e decl\ine\ of under/water ec\osystems?Thanos Dailianis, a marine\ biologist fr】om the\// HCM【R-IMBB\C /resea【rc【h instit/ute /【in【 Crete,/ exp\la/\i】ns.“Marine ecosyste】ms are threatened bo/th locally 】\an【d globally/. At the lo\cal l】【evel, the/ coastal zo】ne hosts】 a lot of 【human activities, 】/ i\mp】】o\rt\ant human activities, like 】urban【isation, like agricu\lture, industry of】 co/urse, and【 ot\her uses which cause loc【a\lise/d fo】rms of degradation, l【ike pollutio/n,/ l】et’s s\ay.""But on the other hand, we have la\rge-sca\【le ph】enomena, like global warming/, or ocea/n a\cidificat/ion, which【【 \of course jo】in toge/the】r with the local】 pre\ssures and【 cause/ sometimes uncontrolled ef【/fects【.""In Crete, 】we’/re located in t/he Eastern/ Mediterranean which】/ ri\ght now【 i/s the warmest place in the Mediterranean/ basin.\ This【, a/】lon/【gsid\e with】 the adjacency with /the S\u【ez Cana【l, makes \it】 very sus\ce】pti【ble to ch【an/g【e right now.""So what we see here is an// early w】arning o/f 】things that will probably spread/ 】towards【 the 】west】 of the Mediterranean /in the\ fo\】rthcoming\ years.""/And【 of cour\se, these t【hings also happen at the global level. Global w/armin/g is a global t/hr【eat, of course, and species coming fr【/om other parts /of \th/e world is【 a universal trend right now becaus【e of this ong/oing c/hang/e.""We are of c【ourse c/oncerned because we feel it is our duty to preserve t/his biodiversity for future generations, an/d we feel t【hat righ【/t now it/’s on the ve\rge of be】coming de\g\r\ade\d.""Nature finds its ways, and t【/his 】ri/ch/ness will/ be replaced by \another richness. /The】 problem is\ mainly for us because we ha】v【e built our 【lives \with this biodive/rsity, so the loss of t/his biodiversity 【will /ma/inly af/【】f\ect hum【【ans as a species.""T】he \service\s it provides to us,/ the food, the 】\environment; all the】 stuff that makes】 our【 life nice \t【o live.\&/rdquo;Share this art】icle\【Copy】/paste the article video\ embed link below:CopyShareTweetSharesendShareTweetSharesendMoreHideShare】SendS】hareShareShareSendShareS】hareYo【u /might a\lso like 】 】 】 What’s k/illing】 our \unde【rw/ater ecosystems? 】 【 】 】 / 】 】 Uncharted wate】rs: how maps ca/n help prevent conf\lict o【v/er /marine resources 】 / 【 \ 【 【 \ \ Famil】y-run fisheries struggle as n/ew generation casts net wider 】 【 More a】boutOceanFauna and Flor【aEn\vironment/【al prot【\ectionbiodiversityGree【ce 】 Mo】st viewed \ \Wh】at influ/ence on climate i\s the corona\virus lockdown rea\lly【 having? \ 【 【 】 / The new AI system safeguarding 】premature babies from infec】tion 【 Me/ssenger RNA: th【e mol【ecul/e that \may teach \our bodies to b【e/at cancer 【 \ 【 Apple and Go\ogle 【say they'll work toge/th【er to trace spr\e\ad of coronavirus\ \via smart\p\hones / How EU】 funding is changi\ng 【【the face of La\tvian innova】ti\on \ 】 Browse today�/39;s tagsVLVY

iP1QA gr\o\up o/f climat/e change/ acti/vists, who are part of the int\ernational Extinction Rebel【lion \move\ment, boarded a Berlin\-bound hi\gh【-speed train with an aim to block 】the German capita/l. The/ 】protest was part of many g/lobal demo【s during October. The g/ro】up was o/n a secretly /planned civil diso/bedience 【missio【n called "Rebels Ar】k". A \repl\ica wo】oden ark is set to blo/ck a【 \road but】 i/t's/ not yet kno/wn wh】ich ro/ad this【 will be.The movement\'s plan was to block cap/itals all over the world, \to ge\t gov\e/rnments\ to ta/ke action to【 /save】【/【 th】e planet【.Extinction /R】ebellion was founded near【ly a y//ear ago (】31 Oct) i【n th【e United King【dom and quickly spread acr\o】ss t】he glob/e./ In// 【Germany, ther【e are now aroun【d a hundred local g\r【oups.A【ctiv【is\t: "Time i【s ru】nning out"On the train journey, Euronews spoke to Norm\an /Schu\mann who is\ a mathemati\cian and o【ne\ of the decision-makers 【of the climate protest group. He/'s/\ taken a year】 off work to give his /time to/\ the/ movement."Last summer, I s【aw nature dying because of the heatwave. I understood: time is running out. We have to take act】ion, urgently. We have to act now," said Schumann.Activist】: "I'm \【deepl【y /shocke】d"People from al/l w\a/l【ks of life and\ from man\y political/ 】】parties have j\oined the Extinction\ Rebelli/on. Fro\m】 German \socie/ty, t/here are nurse【s, teachers, artists】, carpen/ters, p/ublisher】s, bankers and IT 】developers su【c【h as Tob【ias."I am deeply shocked\ and dismayed a【bout how mo/】/st people treat ou\r plan\et,"【 sa】id Tobias, "We j【ust have 】eight 【year】s left (bef\ore it i【s /too late【 /for a【 change). I believe, that Extinction Rebellion sh【ould move on this】 non-v/iolent - but radical path. At least we should t【ry to save something."At Berlin 【centr\a\l statio\n,/ Norman and his protest 【gr】oup were closel】y watc\hed by police.Schumann t】ells Euronews, "We/ will lau/nch ci】vil 【disobedience ac/tions /and we will bl/ock 【B【erlin. We will p\ut/ in place r【oad/blo【cks to expr】ess our discontent with climate p/olitics. The go/】vernments t/o blame for not takin//g action."The】 activists put up \their ten/ts in fro【nt of Bundeskanzleramt, Angela 【Merkel's workpla】/ce.Meanwhile, acti【vist【s from Poland and Sc//andinavia went【 to suppor【t t【he move\ment in Ber\lin./ Jor/g】\【en and// Ronn are from Norway."【We are \here in Ber】lin /to 【make a 【stand," said Jorgen, "To wake people 】up, to see that the truth is 】/being told and 】ev】eryo/ne sees how\ critical this (clim】ate situation) is."】Ronn said, "J】oin the movement to stop us】ing /fos/【sil fuels."Early sta/rtAt two 【o'clock in the m/or/【n/ing, t/hey all get up to find out where they have to go. The activist'【s "Rebels Ark" ope】rat/ion \is made in【 secr/et to avoid ea【rly interception from the police and th】e lo【cation【\ is only revealed at the last minute, as the protesters find ou\t that Berlin'\s 】hu\ge five-【\lane round\about linking nor】th to south and east to west】 is to be comple【tely b】lock【ed at Grosser Stern.This map 【/shows the major r【outes whic】【h were af\fected】.Activists tried\ to b\lock police officers so the group could unl】oad the wo/oden blocks to build\ the ark but auth/orities /stepped in.Jo\ergen sa【id, "Well, we were hoping to\ build the ark a/s a symbol,】 a boat/ /th【\at is saving th【e species. Well, we will still try, bu【t I am no】t sure /【if we will succeed y【et. We are chaining up\ /here to make it po【ssi】ble to \】】\do the buildi\【ng.""The gove】rnment must absolutely d【eclare a state of c【lima】te emerge/ncy," said Schumann. /"We【 need a /citi/zens assem【bly// to\ have the slightes】t chance to handle those incalculable consequence】s\, triggered by the clima\te crisis."Police negot/iate 【with activis/tsAs dawn ar【rives,】 po\lice and protesters calmly discuss the situation and the Extinction R/ebellion gr】ou/p agrees t【o /m\ove th】e ark】 a\nd ag/ree o】n bounda【ries.Protest mov】e\m】ents such as 【Fridays for Fu\ture demonstr】ate /with \billboards,【 Extinction Rebellion o/p【ts【 for di/rect action 】wi【th no vi/olen【ce ag/ainst people【 o/r things. The ra\pidly g【row】ing movemen】t ref【ers/ to passive re】/sistance strategies.Meanwhile, the Berlin polic\e and lo】cal government\ deci/de\d not to int\ervene】 and told the gr/oup not t/o dem【onstrate at airpor/ts or affect vital infrastructures but they tolerated the major\ roadb【lock across/ the capital./Is the German go【/vernmen\t listening?Schuman\n and other\ l/eading \activists have been 【invit【ed t【o a /confi】de【ntial te】t【e-a-tet\e at Germany'【/s /】environment ministry.\ It【'l\l】 be an informal two h/【ours discussion.Oth】er protests happened at oth【e】r s\ignifica/nt \place/s in\ the city at \the same time; blocki】ng traffic at Potsdamer Plat】z; blocking the Minist/ry of 【Environment; blocking various cruc】ial bridg\e/s in centr【al Berlin and\ at symbolic places such as at The Christi】an D】em/ocratic Un【ion of 】Germany(CDU) hea【dquarters.Volker Quaschining \is German】y's scientif【【ic social m】edia st\ar and a prof\【esso/r in renewable energy and 】a founder of the grou\【p "S/cientists\】 for \F【ut\ure"./ He said the governmen【t'】s cli【mate 】packa【ge doesn't me\/et the nee】ds to combat glo【bal warmin】g."Ha【ve a lo【ok /at other countries,\ for example, Sweden, they have【 a tax on CO2【 e】missi】on【s, cu\rrently at over 100 【Euros per ton of CO2\. That \is ten times the 】ta】x proposed i【n Ger【【many," Quaschining \sa【i【/d, "And eve】n in 【Sweden, they are to slow to meet their c】lima】】te p【/rot/ection/ targets."Major Berlin t】raf【fic crossroad\ blocke】d. Estimated 700 clima【te act】ivists lau\nched #Berl【inBlocki\eren 】week. Ongoin/】g.Pu\b】liée par Euronews En【glish sur \Dimanche 6 oct】obre 2019Ex【tinction Rebellion d/em【ands a\【 Citizen's 【】AssemblyEx/t】inct】ion Rebellion wants go】vernm】ents t\o create 】a Citi】zen's 【Assembly\. It 】wants peopl/e from all d/e】mographic b\a\ckg\【rounds to make r】e【commendations for go【vernmen/t/s \to】 resp\】ond to/ climate change. Thi/s is a system already u/sed in Europe, in The 】Netherla】nds】, Ireland, Belgium, Poland, 】and other c\ountri【\es.This system empowers citizens to w/ork together and ta\ke respo/nsib/】ility. Assemb【ly】】 members listen to balanced information from exper//ts and those /people mo【【st affected by the eme\rgency. Me】mbers a】re heard openly】 and/ honestly in small 【groups/ together with professio//nal facilit】ators and are run b//】y non-government/al organis【a\tions (NGO's) for independence.The second night of prot/estsAs the sun se/】t, pro【te【sters prepare】d /f】or a second nig/ht outside, continuing to block t/he five lan】es of t/he rounda\bout.Schu/m【ann is happy with the 【protest, a】nd said, "Tod】ay was absolutely a great success.【 It still i】s】 a great 【success. We came 【to s/tay.【 A】nd we are/ st/ill/ here【.】 The ark【 sta】nds【. That was our plan. And the ark will stay. Now, we prepare for \/the ni【\ght, we are looking ahead, whatever happens, we will persist."The】 group stayed for 58 h】ours and l】eft to go to an\other/ prot\est.【【Even t【hough 【there's criticism \of【 t】he【 m】ovement's actio\ns, stopp/ing 】people fro\m g\etting to hosp】it\als o【r to wo/】rk,【 Extinct\io/n Rebell【ion said \i【t will c】ontinue【 to organise mass peaceful disrup\tions unt/il the government's across the gl】o\be declare a c】li/mate and【 ecolo\gical emergency.121212/1212121212/121212【1212【1212121212121212121212121】21212121212121212】12121212Journalist name •】 Louise MinerShare this articleCopy/paste the \article video【 /embed 【link below】:CopyS【har\eTwee】tSharesendShareTweetSharesendMoreHideS/hareSendShareShareShare【S/en\dShar\eShareYou m\i】ght also like\ / / / \ Extincti/\on /Rebellion activi【sts face 【sentence 【for superglu】e train protest 【【 】 】/ / Lon【don police under f】ir【e after banni【ng Extinction R】/ebe/l【lion c\limate pro】tests 】 【 / / \ 【 【 /】 Ext【inction 【Rebellion co-foun/der arrested afte】r /sma/shing【 minis/try window 】 \ Mo】re aboutActivism/Extinct/i\on Rebe】ll/io】nEnv【ironmental pro/tectionE】\col/o【\gyP\rotestGermany【 】 【 Brows/e 【to/d【ay/9;s】 tagstQ1O

mMI5\Te】xt sizeAaAa/A s\how【case of t】ho/usands of completel\y sustainable f\abrics is co】ming to London, or】ganiser The Sustainable【 Angle has announced.【The not-for-profit o/r/g/anisation has been a rele】ntl】\ess/ 【s【upporter of innovative/ lower\ carbon solutions to fashio/n&rsquo【;s biggest problems【 since 2010 and hopes that this/ \ev/ent 】will encourag/e ev/en/ more /designe】】rs and creators【 to adopt 】respo/n【sible solutions.】This will \be the ninth e/dit】ion of the Fut】ure Fabrics Expo which is the l\argest sho【wcase of sustainable fabrics of its k】ind. /With each f\abr【ic, informa/tion about where it has com/e from and 】/the/ environm\e/nta【l footpri/nt\ of【 its】 manufacture w\il/l be/【 provided. I【ncreas【ing tr\an/sparency in【 how our clothing i/s made is on】e\ way to he/lp bot【h designers and co【nsumers to 【make responsi\ble choice【s.Materials /o\n show will】 include 】the i/ncreas\i【ngly popular TENCEL Lyoce\ll and Modal as well as【 several fa/brics th】at take an innovative approach to post-cons【】umer recycling. Wi\th fashion waste /firm【ly in】 【the spotl【igh【t this season, there is a real dri【ve from /\consum】ers towa/rd more circular soluti【ons\】.These m\ode【rn approa\】ches will be e/xhibited alongside co/mpanies that ch】ampion t/rad\it\ional sustainable ma】te/rials/ like line/n and bast. Although less common i/n modern designs, these ancient f【】ab/rics are biodeg】radable and water-efficient. 【The plant fi【b【res fr】om 【】【whi】ch\ they are grown can ev\/en sequester C【O/ from the atmosphere.Founders of the expo, 】The【 Su】stainable Angle, hope t】o change the fash/ion i】ndustry \for the bet/ter s【o that, instea/d of stri】ppin/g resources an/】d p/oll\uting environments, \it can【 have a 】po/sit/i/ve impa【ct on n\ature an\/d the communities that 】\make o】ur cloth/es.Read/ More | W\【hat is Tencel? \T//h【e s\ustainable fabric e/v【eryone is 】talking /aboutClaire\ Bergk/am\p, Global Director of S【us【ta】inability and Innovation, Stella McCartney (left) in/ 【convers\ation/ with Orsol/a de Castro, Co-foun】der of Fashion Revolution】 (right)【\.Suzanne Plunkett /The 【Sustaina】\ble AngleAs well as showing off materials th\at designers can u】se t】o /decrease the e】nviro】nmental impact of t\heir own 【de】signs, the F/uture】 F【abrics\ Expo will also h【o\st panels to h\elp】/ ed/ucate atte\n】de/es and fac\ilitate discussion between industry exp【e【rts. Panels for\ the ninth Future F【abrics Expo will b/e】 focus\ed around r【egenera】t\i】ve, circul/ar ap】proaches to sust\ainable des【ign and how fashion can be a “powerful force /for positive change”.Future\【/ Fashion ExpoS\uzanne Plunkett /The 【Sustainable AngleAt 】a /p】an/el at last 【year’s event, Claire Bergkamp, Glob/al Director of Susta】】】inability and \Innovatio】n at Stella\ McCart/ney emphasised t\he value【 of eve\nts like t\his i】n helping to eradicate unsustainable mat】er\ial\s from t【he【 fashion in【du\/stry; “We have to \repl/ace them with i/nnova】t\ive, sustainable alternatives. The o/】ther half of inno】vati】on in the【】 future of fabrics has to be about rethinkin】g t【he syst】em【s 【tha】t we /have now…/【How can we find lower-im【pact ways o\f【】 】creating things?”.Part of the /Expo last year al】】so in【cluded two curated areas dedic\ated to fashion bra\nds fully embraci\ng responsib/le s】our\cing and circularity in thei【/r 【collections. New collaborati/on/s【 between leading designers and companies c/reating inno】vative new material\ technologies are the ideal outcome from this event.Suzanne Plunkett /The 】Sustainable A】ngle【The \【event will take place from the 29th-3】0th Januar/y 2020 at\ Victoria House, Bloomsbur\y Square, 】L】ondon. Tick/et registratio/n f/or de【【signers/ and brands /can be/ found h\er【e.Share this article \ 】More /from l\ife8Ju9

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2.dIQZ\Clima\te change i/s\ makin【g Arctic waters more access】ib/le to/ vessels, 】\raising the c\on/troversial prospe【c】t of more ind/ustrial-\scale fishing/. On the lates/t episode of】 \Ocean, Euronews】 looks at what'\s being done】 to prev/ent\ /the】】 threat to \the 【A】rctic e】cosystem.Greenland i】s warming\. Among/ other thi【ngs,\ this【 means long\er f】ish【ing seasons. Be/tween the ic///ebergs o/f Iluliss】at, it&rsq【uo;s 】a gold ru/sh. Fish\ing boat】s equipped with【 mo【dern machinery pull up hundreds of ki/los of catc【h every d/ay.Ilulissat fisherman Marti】n J&os【las/h;rgense\n is worried:&ld【quo;There】\’s too much fishing goi【ng on around here】. It’/s so p】rofitable\ now that al【【l the】 b/ig 】】fish h【ave been taken out; we’re catching smaller fi/sh now”.Sleds, dogs and boatsTo be\ closer to buyer/s, fisherm\en are moving from 【coastal villag/es to ci\ti【es. 【The【 population of Oqaatsut, an \Inuit s\/ettlement on Greenland’s west】 c/oast, ha/s f】al/len to less th/an 30 people. Sle】d d\ogs, tra【ditionall【y us】ed for【 ice fishing and 】huntin/g, have been d【ecimated i/n man/y commu/nities, as th【e 【w\ar】/mi\ng climate makes bo【at/s mo【re usefu【l than dogs.&rdquo/;The sledding 【used】 to start in【 October," say/s/ Oqaatsut fish【erma/n Steen Gabr/ielsen, "but now that there’s not eno【ugh ice, we ca【n just use bo\ats all year round.&r\dquo;Arctic Se\a Ice Reaches 2019 Minimum Extent\C\hanging ecosystemAs the seas \get war/mer, new species of fish are finding their way to Greenland&】rsquo;【s c【oa/sts —【 【the/se include mackerel, herring, At/lantic \bluefi】n/ tuna and cod. But not every\one is ha/ppy. \The fishermen say t【heir most profitable catch — halibut — /is getting harder to find during the warmer pa/rt of th【e year.“Halibut li\kes cold water," explains Niels Gundel/, a /fisher\m【an 】in Ilulissa/t.【 "As summers /b】ecome warmer and longer 【it moves away, to stay wher【e【 it&rsq】uo;】/s【 c【\ool.”Immin\ent/ dan【】gerI/n the fut\ure, retreating sea i】ce an【d /changes in/ fish stocks could bring commerc/ial fish】ing fleet【s into th】e unprotected international wate】rs a】/round t】\he North Pole.Scien/t\ist】s a\【re sounding t】he alarm: unregul\ated fishing could destr】oy the poorly studied e】cosystem of/ the Centra/l Ar【】ctic Ocean】, where fish can b】e sparse and essent】ial to the s/urvival of】/ other【 animals.In a bid t\o stave off t】his imminent thr\e【at/, the European Union br【ought all\ main parties togeth/er in Ilulissat to agree on】 a c/】omme】rcial fishing】\ ban 】in the Arc/tic hi\gh seas\ for at least 16 ye/ars.【T【his land/mark internati】onal a】g】reement was s/【igned by the EU, C/anada, C\hi\na, Denmark (inclu/ding Greenl】and and【 the Fa】roe Island/s), Iceland, 】J【】apan, the /Republi】】c of Kor\ea, Norway, Russia and the U\nited States. Together, thes\e 【pa\rties represent some 75% of gl【obal GDP.Arctic cat\ch 2017Under this legally bindi【ng agreement, /the 】C/entral Arctic area - roughly the size \of the Medit【er/】ranean Sea - will remain off-limits for 【f【ishi【n\g fle【ets, at【 leas】t unti/l scientists con】firm\ that fishing i】n the r\egi】on can be done su【stai】nably.Preca/utionary ap【proachAt the Arctic \University of Norway in \Troms/ø, Professor To\re Henrikse/n he\ads the】】 Norweg\ian Centre for the Law of the/ Sea\.&l/dquo;T\his agree\ment/ is reflect\ing the precauti/o】nary a】pproach, that whe/n you// ha【ve little or very\ inadequate /\inform\/ation you should act\ cautiously \and only reg【ulate, and adapt the regu/lation, according to 【the in【formation/ you have," Professor Hen\rikse】n explains. "P】reviously, 【you started fishing, /and then you regu】late it. And th】en at 【that stage,】 it could b\e too late.”/Map\ping the Arctic se/asThe【 futu】re of the】 ban 【will depend on th\e find\ings o/f the scien/tific c/onsortium le【d by pro】fessor Pauline /Sn】\oeijs Leij/onmalm. Sh】e heads a\ t】eam of European researchers on the MOSAiC expediti】【on — a year-long silent ice drift close to the North \Pole.Onboard th/e Polar\stern icebreaker“Normall【y, wh\en】 【the ic/ebreak】er mov【es through 】the\ \ice, you w/ill/ not get good acoustic data,/ because th】ere/’s too much sound fro/m t【he i/cebreaker. No/w we&rsquo【;\ll have a whole year \】o\/f acoustics, and it\ 【is just a d\ream!&/rdquo;As w】【ell【 as using sona/r, the /\EU-suppo//rted r\esearchers will rec】ord vid/eos with a deep-water【 camera, take environm】ental DNA sam【ples at various depths, a/nd for the f【irst time catch some Central Arctic fish.】MOSAiC Exp/edition/'s d\eep-water/ re/search camera“We will\ be able to a/nalyse its stoma\ch, 】its/ stable isotopes, i/t【】】【s fatty ac\i【ds," Profe】ssor Leijonmalm says. "It will tell us 】about the 】he】alth【 of the fish, and where/ it has com\e/ from because \fish mi\grate — so we /w【ill have a 】lot of info】rmat【ion, just by having/ a fish in our hands.”The disco【veries of thi\s \and fu\t】ure】 expe【ditions will deter\mine wheth【er fi【sh】ing /\in the Central Arctic Oce\an /can be done sustainably &mda】sh; or whether \these h/igh se】as should remain untouche\d for the dec【ades to come.】To wat】ch th【e f【ull epi\sode of /Ocean, click on 【the media pla/yer above121212121212121212Share this/ articleCop】y/paste the article 】【video embe【d li\nk below】:CopyShareTweetSharesen/dShareTweetSharesen【dMoreH/ideShareSendShare【ShareShareSendShare【ShareYou might als\o like \ \ 【 】/ 【 \ EU fish/ quota q\uarrel\ - ministe/rs hail d\ea/l, NGOs slam overfishing 【 【 】 \ 【 \ 】 Watch: Thirty-】five years of Arctic thaw in\ tw/o minut/es / / \ 【 】 【 S】cientists have embarked fro】m\ /Norway on the longest-ever expedit/ion to the /Arctic 【 【 【 More ab/ou/tGlobal warming and cli】mate change【FisheryArcticEnv\iro】nment\al prote/ctionGreenland 【 /\【 【 Mo】st viewed 【 【 【 / \ 【 \ \ What infl\uenc】e o\n climate is/ the coronavirus 【lockdown \r【eal【【ly havi】ng? / 】 The new AI system safeg】【uar/d\【ing premature /babies fro/m infecti\o【n \ 】 【 】 \ 【 / Messenger RNA: the molecule that may/ teach our b【odies to beat cancer【】 \ 【 】\ 【 】 \ A】pple a】nd Google 】say they'll work toge【ther【 to】 trace spr】ead of coronavi/rus via smartphones \ // 】 How EU funding is chan【ging t【h\e face/ of 【L】【atvi/an in】novation\ 【 【 Browse tod【ay's\ tagsdxpD

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mFFqThe Eu/rop【ean Union 】h\as stepped i】n to help small /fi【】shing/ communities 】preserve/ their way of】 life, as y\oung people t\urn away from the job that their for】ebears 】d\id/ for generations.T【he Swedish-/speaking i【s】land commu/nity of Pellin/ki in southern Fi\nland is typical of those t/h【e EU 】is trying to hel/】p.For gen\erati】ons, fishing has been a respec/ted trade an】d a traditio/nal way of life for man/y famili/es. But today, t【he number of local fishers is dwindling. Only a few remain\.One r【e\ason is 】dec【l【/\ini【ng catch】es. The fishers blame an in】cr/easing number of 【predators: seals and cormorants \/】damage the c\age\s and dec】imat\e\ f\ish\/ 【stoc】ks.Good c\atches are no longer guaranteed, and t/\he\】 e】conomic surviv【【al of family-r】un fisheries is becoming increasing\ly uncer】tain.M\ost chil\dren from fi【shin\g families make 】a 】safer choice】 to/ leave/ home and study s【ometh【ing else.As their parents age and】 retire, small-sc/ale fisheries, once\ 【typical in Finland, \go ou【t /of busi/ness. Nationwide, the /numbe【【r of professional fishers ha】s decli\【ned in recent decades/ from 10 to aroun】d 400.【Twen】t/y-se\v】en-year-old Marie Kellgren has been fishing full-time fo/r m\or/e than four years, alt【hough she acknowl/edges that there are no】】t man\y like her."We&/rsquo;re \not m\any - young peop\le \fishing】. \I think 】it’s because it’s 【【physically hard wo【rk, and you don&rs【quo;t know for ho】w many years you c/an do \it. It's a bi【g risk to/ start."She in】itiall/y we【nt to stud】y t\ourism \in Helsink【i but then took up the op】por【tuni】ty of【 a local &ldq【uo;Master-【\【Apprentice" pr/og\ram to l【earn /t】he trade f\rom her /fat】her.\The】 EU-supported scheme provided a s\mall g】rant that allowed Marie to work for a year as an a/pprent】ice 】fisherwoman — without 】putting her fathe】r's business under any further fin】anci/a/l st【ra【in.My\ father 】is a fisherman, 【m\y father’s fat】her was 【a f【ish/erman, an【d my】 fathe】r's f【ather's father was\ a fisherman. /】 】 \ V】iking Kel\lgr/en 】 【 】 Her father, Viking, told Euronews: &ldq/uo;/】My fa\th【er is a fishe】rman, my 【father’s father w】as/\ a fi\sherman】, a\nd my father's f】at/h】er's \father was a\ fisherman. So M】arie/【 is the f【ifth gener】ation fishing here/."Th\e t\raining p/rogram included some th/eory an【d/ 】800 h】o】ur\s of fishing pra\ctice\."I lear】ned how to fish with nets and with trap\s, t/【o take care \of t】he fish, the catch, and to/ prepar\e, to 【salt a】nd to smoke and cold【-s】moke a\nd /make fishcake【s, and marke\tin【g, and all \o\ther st【uff about pay\ing 【b】\ills."The funding 【for the "Master-Ap【】p\rentice" pr\ogram wa【s pr\ovided main/ly by the Euro】pean Mar【itim【/e and Fishe】ri】es Fund, which supports generational rene/wal/】 in Europe's】 f/ishing sector. The idea came from \the local fishing comm\unity i\n Pellinki, when another aspir\ing fisherwoman, Tanja Åkerfelt, was struggling to enter the profess/ion."My fat/her didn&r【squo;t think th【at \was a 【go//od ide】a,” Tanja said. &ldq【uo;That&\rsquo;s when I had to 】talk to】 other fisher【m【en, won\de【r】in/g, how coul/d【 we do【 this.”O】ne /of the fishermen she【 sp/oke to was E】sko\ 】Taanila, who man】ages th/e pa/\rtnership /b【etw\een/ privat\e and public sto【ckhold】ers in】 the loc【al fisheries【【 se】ctor, kn【own as a FLAG &mdash】; Fis【heries Local Actio/n Group.Taanila came up with s/implified 】paperwork &mdash\; a formal【 contract and t/he 【tr\aining pr\og】ram\ for both the mas\t\er a/nd t【he\ appr\entice.Training a【 new 】fis【her costs around 6,000 e/ur/os. Esko says it's an ine【xpensive way to sustain【 professional fishing, which is the o】nly ye\ar-round econom】ic 【activity i/n the Pellinki are【a.T\h【e progr/am is helping to slo【\w the decli\ne of south\ern F/inland's fishing community — but/ it cannot reverse it.T【aanil\a 【said: &ldqu】o;Ever】y time 10 fis\hermen q【\uit, we get one or mos】tly two young peopl/e w\ho 】/are inte【re【sted in continuing."The progr【am has been running f【\or three years. Out of 15 app\rentices, 12 d【/ecided to \keep fishing professionally.That's a hi【gh succ【ess rat\e, but with the g/r】owing seal p】roblem and the fu】ture【 of fis/h s/to\cks uncer/tain,】 these/】 ef/for\ts might not be enough."We 】hav\e to get \new fisherme\n because/ the avera/ge age here is 60 years o/ld,&rdquo\; said Ta/an】il\a. &【ldquo;So if\ \we do nothing, 】it】 wi【ll】 //take only【 five or six years and everybody wil【l have quit. It is ve\ry important that\ we have a【 living fishery in【 ou/r coastal areas.】 Without tha/t,/ it c【ou\ld be a dead ar】ea. And that&\/rsquo;s not n【ic/e."Much furthe【r south, off the coast of the Belgian port of Ostend, the fishing 【tradition is thriving and u\【ndergoi/\ng/ a renewal.With its limite【】d coas\tline【 an/d only six d\oze【n\ fishing vessels, Belgium is\n't a big fi【\shing】 country /—】 but in coastal 【West Flanders/ province, f【ishing tradi】t/ionally played an importan【t role.A lo/cal maritime \scho\ol &ndash【; the Maritie【m\ Instituut Mercator – runs\】 a ded/icated training ship, \wh【ich was renovated with EU he\lp.Built\ in 1967/, the "Br【o\odwinner", /a beam tra/wler, was refi/tted to provide bett】er safety and a gr/eater level of comfort than on t\raditional】 ve\】ssels.Bart DeWae/gen\ar/e, \a teacher at/ t【he Maritiem】 Insti/tuut Mercat\or, said s】tudents get\ esse\ntia/l hands-【【on training. Most of th/em d\on't have the se【a in their blood."I 【think maybe 20 per】 ce\nt are from】 familie/s that did it bef】ore, and 80【 per cent don’t【 even know anything about it. The】\y come/ from big /cities lik【e Antwe/rp and 【B\russels, no\th】】i【ng to do\ with t【he s\ea.&rdq】uo;Stud【ent/s go on eight-hour f/ishing trip】s sta【rting \fro【m the age of 12. By\ 16, 】t】hey spend】 hal】f 】o】f th/eir school ti】m】e at sea.Along with var/ious f/ishing-related skills, they learn navigati/on and marine engineerin【g.Most are /seeking a job in the maritime\ sector,】 but not necessarily in the fis/hing industry, 】where the work is har/d and the/ risk of accidents high./Sami \Tebbouche\, a student, said: "Y】ou 】have to learn to sail the vessel on your own】. You have to wa【ke up at night to repair \t\he net/s. It's tough!"Another student, Seppe DeKinde】r, said the unpredictable n】ature of th】e job】 puts many young 【people off. Fishermen's salaries can be ver/【y high - or low, depe】nding on the catch."It&r【squo;s unp\redictable ho【w much】 you ca【/n earn\ sometimes. That&/rsqu\o;s why a lot 【of p】eople are uncerta【in i\f\ they rea/lly/ want to do it/】. And /also becau【se it’s really h】ard wo】rk. And a【 lot 【of p【eople \have k】i/d\s a/nd stuff, and they don&rsq/】uo;t want to【 leave them behind."\In the 1980s, five vo/cati\o\nal】 sch【ools【 】tr\ained 3【00 pupils a /year to wo】rk in fisheries. Today, only o\ne【 【sch】ool wit【h 40 students 【remains.Teache/rs say /that in the modern era, even high salar】ies and improved【 【/working conditions are n】ot enough to /ma【ke fishing attractive for【 yo【ung peopl】e.The scho【\o/l’s headmaster Jac【ki/e Scherrens said: "I\n th】e /p【ast, when they/ 】were, for example, two weeks at se】a, three days in the 】harbour, but from the th【ree da【/ys yo】u had 】to work】 two \days, and that was no problem. Now, when they a/【re, let&rsquo\;s say, /e/ight day】/s a】t sea, 【four days in /h】arbour, and/ you ha】ve to work one【 or two \days/ &m/d】【ash; they don\&\】rsquo;t wan【t that anymore! S/o it&rsquo\;s【 very difficult【 to attract you\n【g people for it."There /\are hopes th【at/\ si】x new vessels about to】 enter the Be/lgian fis】hing【 fleet will revive interest i\n the profession.1212121【】2121212121Shar\e this a【rticleCopy/pas\te the a/rticle video embed link below:CopyShareTw/eetS】【】】har】esendShareTweetShar】esendMoreHide【ShareSendShareShareShareSendSha】reSha\reYou/ might also l/ike 】 【 /\ The importance of re【sto】ring ma/rine【 b/iodiv】ersi】ty \ 【 M\o/re a【boutFishery/YouthOceanEnvironmental【 protection/ 】Most viewed /\ 【 \ / 【 What i【nfluence on climate is 】the coronavirus lockd\own rea\lly having? 】\/ 】 The new AI system safeguar\ding premature babies from infecti【on \ \ 】 / 】 Mes【sen\ger RNA: the molec\】ule that may teach our bodies to beat cancer 【 【 / 【 【 Apple and Google say t/hey'/;l\l work together /to t】ra/ce spread of //【c\or\onavirus via s】martphones How EU fundin\g is/ cha/nging \the face of Latvian innovation 】 【 【Brows】e today's【 tagsdUU8

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e3ULGerm【an Chancellor/ An\【ge【la Merkel said she wants \her/ country to aim】 to neutralise gas \emissions by 2050, so as to be C】O2 neutral, but this has to be r【e/alistic.Mrs M【erkel spok/e a\t the Pe】tersberg C/limate Di/al【ogue co/nference on cli【mate change /tha/t t/ook p【lace in Berlin, and noted 【that she 【understands the desire to\ pr\ot\ect the\ environment."】/There are chi\ldren a/nd you】ng people\ around the /\world who d\emonstrate ev【ery 】【week so th】at\ th/ey 】can push for】 the prot】ectio【n \of the envir【onmen【t. They are pushing \all the politicia】n】s worldwide. To be hon】est, this is \n】ot /at all pl/easant, but\ I wa\n【t t】o\ stress that i【t is】 absol【ute/ly und/erstanda\ble," the German Chan/cellor sa【id. At the same time that global leaders and internat【【ional players d/iscussed the environment, G【reenpe\ace ac\t/ivists s【taged/ a protest at \the B】randenburg Gate,/ ca【lling f】or immedia】te measu/res."We mu/st take the right deci【sions for our future now, that's why we're here. T/o s/end a /clear message for a last chance as\ ti\me is running out," said Robin Miller.Ang\ela Merkel stressed that 】we【alth\y \countries that pollute the en/vironment more have the greatest responsibility t】o face up t/o clim/【ate change immediately.\Share t/h】【/is articl【e【Copy/past】e the \article video embed\ link be】low:Co\】py\Share【TweetSharesendShareTweetShares\endMore【HideShareSendShareShareShareSendShareShareYou might also lik】e 【 【】 】\ / 】 / Climate chan】ge: Responses to Merkel's\ vow【 to 】neutralise German'】;【s CO2 ar\e ambivalent 】 】 Carbon dioxide hits a level not】 】seen for 3 million 【y】ears. He】re&#How smal/l scale fisher【ies sa】ved/ Danish f\ishing c\ommunities【39;s what that/ \me//ans for 【\climate c】hange — and 【humanity【. \ 【 【 】 【 Eight EU countries /【call for more ambitious strateg【y t\o tackle climat/e change / / \ \ More aboutGermany/Angela M/erkelclima】te】 【chang】e】climat/e p】rotestsEnvironme】ntal prot/\ectionGreenpeaceHot TopicLearn more\ ab【out / c】limate change /Hot TopicLearn \more about \ climate change / Br【ow【se today�】s】【 t【agsPVa1

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nf3I\President Donald Trump】 says he has issued a directive to halt U【S pay\ments 【to t\he\ World Health \【O【rganizatio\/n.T】/he funding wi【ll】\ 【cease pending a review of WH/O's \warnings abo\ut/ the coronavirus\ and C/h/i】na.Trump sa/y【s 】the outb】reak could h\av/\e been contained at its sou【r【ce and spared lives had the U\N health a】gency done a better 【job inv/estigatin【g reports comin\g out【 of China.Trump cl【aims th/e organisation failed \to carry】 out its ///&ldquo\/;bas【ic dut/y&r【dquo; and】 must 【be held accountable.Shrinki【n】g of UK economyEarlier o【n【 Tuesday th/e UK's /tax and spending watchdog/ has s/aid the British econ【o\my \cou【ld shrink\ by 】a record 35 percent】 by June. The bl】eak report come【s fro【m the\ Office for Budget Respo】nsibil/ity.Com/menting【 on the g【\overnment's resp\onse /to the crisis, Finance Minister Rishi Sunak sa\id the measures p】u【t/ i\n p\lace w/ere the \"right p/lan".View his news conference in the video p/l/【ayer aboveOffi】ci【al statistics on Tuesday showed t\/hat hun【dred】s of deaths in British car【e homes have not been in】cluded i【n】 govern【【ment f】igures -- which only /take\ account of death/s in hospita\ls. I】【t【 has led to crit/ic/ism that the eld/erly ar\【e being "airb\rushe】d \/ou】t".Sunak insist【ed that the country's【 battle against coronavi/rus was "n\ot a\ choice between health 【and economics". Other 【key \developments:The/ Internationa/l Mone】tary Fund (IMF) sai】d in its】 latest forecast t/hat the w【orld econo\my would suffer its worst year since the Grea\t Depression of the 1930s \-- and shrink by thre/e percent in/ 20/20.US Presiden】t Donald 【Trump has defende/d his administra/tion's handling 【of the【 pan【demic】, saying he has "to】ta【l power" t\o li】ft the lockdown\ if need be.France\ /and India hav\e jo/ined Italy in/ extending their nationwide lockdowns to stem the spread of the deadly 【nove\l coronav【irus】.These decisi【ons come as the/ number of infec\tions【 worldwide near the two mi/llion threshold. Nearly 120,000 people have【 now lost 【/th\eir lives 】to COVI/D-1/9】.】Foll\o】w all the latest updatesShare thi/s articleCopy/paste the a\rticle【 vid】eo embed \lin/k below:Copy】ShareTweetS】h【aresendShareTweetS/ha【res【endMo/reHi\de\ShareSendShareShareShareSe【ndShar/eSh\a/reYou might also like / / / Rising populism sto【kes disco\ntent but offers f\ew solutions to】 global thre【ats like COV\ID-1【9 ǀ View 】 【 【 / \ C/ould a ce】ntury-old met/hod 】help treat COVID-】【1 pa】tients? 【 】 \ \ \ \ 】 / How to s】tay healthy\ working from h】【ome, according to chiropractor\s\ 】 【 More aboutC】O】VID【-1CoronavirusEuro【pean Un\ionHot Topi】cLea/rn more about / Coronavir\u\s Hot TopicLearn more about 【 Coronavirus \ Brow/se【 tod】ay】9;s tags5PPA

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ELu5Text 】s/izeAaAaAfter more tha\n a week of \protests a】round London,【 the cap/ital&rsq【/uo;s】 police force has rescinded its permissions f/or \E/x【tinction Rebel/lio/n to /pro/te\st in the UK cap/i【tal.Re/bels had pr【evio\usly /been campin/g a【t locations around Lon【don, wi】th\ a base camp\ established under the Nels/on’s C】olumn in Trafalgar S【qu/are.Traffic a/round Trafalgar Square was rerout/ed l】ast week af】ter p/\rotestors took t\o the streets,】 bl【ocking roads in a bid to ra【ise aw/a/r/eness on cli】mate change. They were calling on th/ose in pow】e/r to ta【ke immedia\te climate action, i/ncl/uding expeditin\g the【 process of beco【ming car\bon neutral.The\ Metropolitan Po【lice c/【/ited 【the 1,445 arrests】 it had made - including that of 】a 75 y/】\ear old - alongside prote/sts disru\p【/tin/g tra\vel and\ busines\s in the 】City of Lond/on 【as reasons for cl\amping down on 】the protest.“These conditions hav【e been imposed 】/due】 】t【o th】e continue/d breaches o\f the s\ection 14 【condition previ/ously imp【lemented, and ongoing serious \disruption to the community,&rdq/uo; Depu【ty【 \/Assi/stant Commissioner Laur/ence Taylor said i/n the announ\cement.&/ldquo;】We h】ave made【 s//ignific\ant progress in\ managing】 】Ext/inc】ti\on R/ebellion’s activity/】 at sites across【 central London over this】 past\ week. Officers have b\eg\un the process of clearing Trafalga/r Square a/nd getting things back to normal,” he added.Extinction Rebellion co/nfirme/d/ it would relinquish Traf/alga【r /Square to authorities but in a 【statem】ent said:】 “The Internationa】l Rebell】ion conti【n/ues.”&ldqu】o;Th【e Cli\m】ate and Ecological Emergency isn&rsq\uo;t going away and we rema【in【 re/solut【e in f\acing i\t】,&rdq/uo; th\e statement contin/ues.&ldq\【uo】;We /urge the Gover/nment an/d the authorities to join us in doing the same. We【/ /cann】ot do it】 alone.”Howe】ver】, \in a Tweet, the activism gr】o【up admitted it broke the law &\ldquo【;\【in careful &】 deliberate way\s, fully un\derstanding \the\ /conse/quences of action b】eing tak】en”.It wen】【t on\: &/ldquo;/】Today,【 an unprece【dente】d, poli【tical\, de\cisio\n has been taken t【o shu/t down pe\ac/efu\l prote/st \call【ing out t/he gover\n/ment fo\r inaction in the f\ace of cris/is./&rdq【uo;Reactions in the T/witterverseMany of those pr【otesting took to socia\l media\ 【to\ highlight their fury at the decision to end the protest a w/eek early.Share this article 】 More from placesh8zn

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