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500万彩票网2020年05月30日00时42分08秒

时间:2020-05-30 00:42:10 作者:太平洋汽车 浏览量:93268

复制网址打开【AG88.SHOP】教育咨询门户 zIFfnKHt【9;M/onster fa】tberg',\ bi【gger than the 【Tower of Pis】a, discov/【ered in D】evon /xIMP

8zrLThe 【import/ance of res】【toring mar\ine biodiversityh46k

5bapText si【zeAaAaThe common hippo】p【o/ta/mus is know\n for th\eir /rapacious appetites and spending a lot /of/ time/\/ in water, no wond】e【r, 'river hor【se is the literal En】glish translation o\f【 the Greek word Hipp【opotamus/. T\hey spend up to 16 ho/ur/s a day submerg】e【d in rive/rs and la】kes to keep their massive bodies cool under th/e hot African sun. And in t//he rest of /their】 time? They consume】\ bet/ween 25-40 kilos of grass.And with【 these two \act【ions, they already do a lo【t for th/ei【r env/iro【nmen/t. A recent study b\/y /University of Antwerp 】biolo】g\ist J\onas Schoelynck and his/ 】col/leagues, published in Scienc【e Ad/vances found hippo/' daily hab【its pl/ay a key role in maintainin/g】 e/co】syste【ms. Th\【e scientists fo】und out about their key r/ole【 by/\ /】analysing s/ample/s from the Mara R\iver, which runs throu【gh t】he Maasa/i Mar【a National Reserve, a savann\ah in Kenya.The mam//mal】s living in this park are protected, h【oweve】r\, ou/tsid/e o】f t】hese a/r\ea/s scient/ist\s sa/y h\ippo numbers/ are down. The IUCN Red \List describes the hippos as vulnerable and now scientists are war/ning 【tha】t t\h/e dw【indling number of hippos across A/fr\ica/ \is potentially harmful to the continent's /rivers and la/k】es.Clic/k on the video a/bove to see how hippo\s make th】e ecosystem run around them.Share this article More \/f】rom pl】acesrnJ3PYSp

G7vUImage】s of rubbish piling up in the ocean can be a depressing si/ght. But the good news is that 【ther/e are signs \that cleanup campa/igns are hav\i【ng an 【impact.\At the annual clean u】【p event in Marseille, le】ss a】nd less rubbish is being foun【d. Alain Dumort is head of \t【he Europe】an C】ommission Repres\entative Office in M\a】rseille. A pa\ssionate s】cuba diver, he has joined hundred\s\ 【of voluntee【rs making the plunge in【 muddy Old Por/t waters to 】clean u/p the piles\ of trash \a【ccumulated there over the years.Unli【kel】y as it seems, t/he situation here in M/arseille is imp】r/oving. 【 【 】 \ \ 【 / Alai\n 【/Dum/ort】 / \ 【 / 【 \ 】/ European Commission Representati/v/eMarseille 】 \ “Unl/ikely/ as it s【eems,】 the situation here in Ma】rseille i【s im】prov】ing,” he says. “The type of wast\e has chan/ged o】】ve\r the/ three years that we have bee】n co-organising this cleanup event. Why? Beca/use o】ur partners 【- I won’t name commercial bran【ds - are very consc\ious \o【f the problem. They&rs【q/u\o;ve cut/ do【wn on litter, e】spec\ially singl\e\-use pla/stic【, and/ inst/alle\d mor】e waste bins, so there's l\ess and less r】ubbish of /this【 type.&l【dquo;We see othe【r was】te such a】s buil\】ding-site barriers, bicycles and of cours】e electric scoo【ters, 】bu】t l\e\s/s】 and\ less of those too. And that's a p\【retty good【 】sign. Now the【 goal is to】 shift the emphas】is to rec\【ycling】 and reuse【,/ to deal with all the waste that still\ e/xists — that is the \priority.&rdq\uo;Cleanup operation \is a/ glo\bal moveme】ntThe Vieux-Port Pro\】p【re opera】t/i【on is one of 【over 70 similar events receiving fi】nan/c【ia\l and orga【nisational support of th【e #EUBeachCle】anup campaig\n around the globe.】&ldq】uo;This operation is part of a muc】h broader campaign, 】as we, t】he Euro】pean Commission, work】 at the Europea【n le【vel, but】 we also have a global calling," says D/umor\t./ "That's why this EU 【Bea】ch Cleanup c】ampa】i/gn is carried out tog/ethe】r wit【h the United Na【tions./"“Similar\ ope】rations/ are taking// p【lace i\n many co\un\t\ries around\ the world, an/d in】 par\t\【icula【/r【 throughout the Med】iter/ranean r【egion - in Italy/,】 S/pa\in, Algeri】a, in Morocco, Jordan and so o\n. It's a t/rul【y global o\p【eration, 【because we know full well that waste that comes 【for example from 】Eg【ypt, 【will one day end up in Cypru】s, or in It】aly,/ or【 here\【 in the Old Port of Marseille. So t【he goal of this】 campa】ign is to have a Eur/opean, a M】edite/rra\nean and a \global dimens【io/n【.”Share this articleC【op\y/paste the ar【ticle video embed\ \link below:/CopyShareT【weetSharesendShare【TweetSharese【ndMoreHide/ShareSendSh【areShareShareSendSh】are【ShareMor】/e aboutC\o/ntaminat【ion of 【wa】terEnvironment\al p【ro】tec【tionSea 【 / 】 】 Most view\ed 【 / \ 】 【What influence on climate is 【the coronavirus lock【do/wn re/all【y having?】 \ \ 】 / The new A【I/ system safeg/uar\ding premature babies from i【【nfection】 /【 \ 】 Me\ssenger R】NA/: the molec\ule that may t\each our bodies /to】/ bea】t canc/e\r \ 【 Apple【 and Google say they'll work 【together 】to trace spread of coron/avir\us via sma/rtphones 【 】 Ho】w E】U\ funding is changing the face of Latv】ian innovatio】n 【 】 【 Browse t【oday'】s \tagsscnF

KZ4tIn Pic】tu【res:】 Deforestation in Brazil's rainforest\【 】【is close to five time/s the size of Lon\don\zMe6

rBHMText s】izeAaAaBlack /cavi【ar was \a delicacy alread【y back i\n the 】】days of Gen\ghis Khan in the\ 12’s. In the 1550&rsqu\】】o;s】, Fra/ncois Rabela\is called it/ the finest pre-main-course/ tre\at out there. The kings and the tsars【 of Euro\pe】 enjoyed th\i】】【s\ fine food throughout the centuries. I【n our days, the roe of stur\geon is synonymous with luxurious living on 】televis】ion (think James Bond) and】 in real life.Getting the c】aviar, h/owever, is in】herently unsustainab\le: to get the fish eggs, f\e【male fish a】re hauled out【 of the waters s【hortly before they are me/ant to spawn and 【sliced open for t/hei/r row, which r】esu/lts in their death. So it is【 hardly a surprise that the s】【tu【rgeon’【s numbers h/a【ve been in an ala\rmingly rapid de【cline, so much so that in【 2001 a UN conventio/n banned fishing sturge\on in \its natu\ral habit/at altogether.A young sturgeon \fishK【asperskianTh】e key wo/rds are &ldq\uo;in its natural habitat&rdq\uo;. The ban/ made the br【ightest/ minds in bio/logy thin】k of \w】ays t【o get /】t【he female sturgeon’s precious cargo without bre【ak【ing the/ law. To circum\vent/ this piece of legislation, the most ob\vious \method was 】t\o cr/】eate fi【sh farms, whic\h technically do not /constitute a nat】ural environment. Such fish farms are quite 【c】ommon in China a/n】d slightly less so in Russia and Nort】h Amer\ica. B【ut to get this 【caviar to th\e】 European market 】with/out【 it \rottin\g, C】hinese pr【】oducers are【 forced to 】use/ /che/mical preservati\ves, which a/re banned/ i】n Japan a\nd in the US – b【ut 【not in Euro【pe.I\f you】&rsqu/【】o;re a fan of 】the delicacy, he/re&rsquo\;s /the good news: there is a h【andful of b/lack caviar producers \/out t【here/ that【 】are\】 \do\ing it【 sustainably &ndash\】; without killing the fis/h – thanks to a method wh\ereby\ the eggs are “mas】saged&【\】rdquo\; out right before spawn\ing. The/ sligh/tly 【worse news is that】 tho【se fish eggs】 /are pa\steu【rized, meaning the end product is not fresh but boil【ed.Luckily,【】 one produc\/er stan/ds out in 】par\t/icul//ar. 【/Swiss-based Kasperski【an purc/hased the right to use a 【technology pat\en/t\ed by Russian bi/ologist Li】liya Kop\ylenko and ar】e the o【nly produ\c\er 【in the world that provides discernin【】/g foodies “caviar\ with life”, w【hich is sustainable, /et【hical/ and as fresh a\/s it can be】】\ all at the sam/e t【ime. Th】e company wa/s founded in 2014 by 【Nes【tle】&\rsquo;s C/【EO Peter Bra\beck-Letmath】e and his【 long-\time friend Konst\antin Sidorov.Konstan\tin 【Sidoro【v (secon/d \from righ\t) at an\ eventKasperski】an“Producing】\ h】igh qual/i】ty bla】ck c/aviar in a sustainable 】way, withou】t killing th】e/】 fish, is e】xtremel】y co【mpl\ex and costly. The difficulty lies not s【o much in ki【lling or【 not killing the fish, but rather in how to process 】the fish eggs a【fterwards to gu\/arantee 】their f/reshness without r/】esort/in/g to the use 【of ch/emicals,” Konstantin Sidorov explained.Fresh/ caviar 【is a live【 prod】uct, 【much like oysters, so you cannot \keep it 【fresh for long. One of t/he biggest problems【, accordin\g to K【onsta/ntin,【 is that tra\ditio\nally/ the p】eak season f\o/r black caviar consum\ption is aroun\d【 the tim\e of C【hristmas and New Yea【r but the s\turg\eon 【usually spawns in \late】 s】prin\g, ar】ound May. There is a \speci【a【l vacuum te【\c\hnol】ogy that c】an k】eep t/he caviar fresh up【 to three months witho/ut havi/ng 】to process i】t or add any kind of pre】servatives /but that bri【ngs \us 【only to August - \still a 】way aw】ay from the /holiday season.The paten】ted technolo\gy used by Kasperski【an \at their fi【s】h fa/rm allows for to\】tal control of】 the\/ fish&rsq【u/o;s environment: what \it eats【 (a factor tha/t can/】 rea】lly affect【【 the】 qualit/y \of the ro【e】), as well as the lig/ht and the tem】p/erature, meaning they can simulate late spring in【 September by\ increas】ing the\ wat\er t】empera\ture and amount of light.\ And【 thus【 c/】onsumer【】s ha\ve fresh 】and su【staina/ble caviar just in time for the \holidays. View this p/ost o】n InstagramThe\ KASPERSKIAN \Cavi\ar with Life is simpl\y】 unique】 ! #Kasperskian #CaviarWithLif【e #S\wissMadeA post s【hared by KASPERSKIA\N (@kas】per【ski\an_cavia】r) o【n Oct 31, 2018 at /1/1:10am PDT“The pool w/e use is an incredibly complex 【structure so th【e】\ costs of the【 te】chnology and main/tenance are very high, which【 reflects on the price of t】he end \product. \Quality product 【can&rs\quo;t be cheap by defini【tion./ And with w\ealth also 【comes a/ certain desire to consume co/nsciously, which means】 that】 our c/u】stomer】s are re/ady to spend more on【 a produ/ct t/hat d\i/【【d no】t cost the f\ish its l\ife. U】nfor】tunately, in our 【day and 】ag】e it&rsq/uo;s easier 】\to k【/ill a life rather th【an sav/e it so we f\eel a\ moral responsibility to sho\w that that needn&rs】quo;t always be the case,” Konstantin c/larified.The d\ecision to /b】ase p\r/oductio\】n in Sw】itzerland/ w/as\ rather/ o/bv/ious for Kons/【tantin and Peter. This country ha\s th/e h/ighest quality con【trol and als】【o rigid regulation【 w】hen it comes to animal welfa\r\e.&ld】quo;Switzerla/nd is t/he only /place that bans b【oiling lobst\ers alive】,/ f】or examp】le. \We receive weekly checks that ar【e very serio\us and thorough】【【. Th】is creates a trust in S\wiss product/s and this /is also】 wh/y our 】product is/ more expensi\ve. We【 cou/ld\ have based our /production in Russia】, which in the minds of 】most is 】t/he h\ome/ of black caviar, but \no one would\ trust that we use sustaina【ble and /ethical methods t/o extract/ it,” Konstantin said. Vie\w this pos/t on InstagramA lunch of dre/ams at Cuck\oo Sushi Club in Zer】mat【t with some Alaska/n Crab Roll with Caviar and Ma【ndar/in Snow/, Lan【goustine Roll with Truffle Sno】w and fin【\al】ly Kasp/erskian Caviar with Life/ ! #Kasperskian #CaviarWi/t【hLife #Sw/issMadeA post shared by KASPER\SKIAN【 (@kaspe\【rskia/n_caviar) on Dec 30, 2【018 at 10:02am PSTBlack caviar /in Zermatt, Switze】rlandI\n a/ddition to the commitment to /the fish’s welfare, \/Kasperskia【n aims to reduc\e【 its impac\/t on the envi/ro】n/ment b\y producin】g \its own e】lectricity \t/hrough so【lar panels and trea/ting /al【l water\s to preserve【\ the\ lo\cal wild fauna and f/lora.Over the years, the caviar producer has made friends in high place】s【 and partner\ed up 【w/ith esteemed\ brands such \as LV】MH, Dom Pérignon an/d Christie】&rsq】/u/o【;s. Aside fro\m ap\plying susta【ina【ble methods/ 【to bl】ack caviar producti】on, Kasperskian also spon\sors/ cha\rit【y】 events lik/e Russian super 【mod【el Natalia Vodionova’s N】aked Heart Gala d/in/ners 【and the】 M\onte Carlo Gal\a\ for the Global Ocean.At the moment, thos】e wh【o wan/\t to t【aste the upscale\ treat can\ find it/ in S】wiss stores like 】Globus【 and \Migros, Swiss sk】i resorts like Zermatt and St. \Moritz\ or 【London clu【bs/ and restauran【ts】 lik【e 67 Pall Mall【, 】/Ocean House, Marivan\na\,【 Bea】st and a f/ew others. View this post o/n /InstagramK】\asperskian C【aviar at 【Mari Vanna Restau/rant (@mar】ivannalondon) in L【ondon Knightsbr】idge. #Ca\/viarWi\thLife #MarivannaA \p】ost shared b\y /KASPERSKIAN (@kasperskian_cavia/r) o【n\ Dec】 7, 2018 at 1/0:/12am】 P【STKaspers】kian caviar i\/n Lon\don's Marivanna\ 【restaurantShare this articl/e / More from wellnessDHbV

/Cavi【ar/ with c/ompassion is set to revolutionize\ the 】d/elicacy】/

VLyK\President Donald Trump】 says he has issued a directive to halt U【S pay\ments 【to t\he\ World Health \【O【rganizatio\/n.T】/he funding wi【ll】\ 【cease pending a review of WH/O's \warnings abo\ut/ the coronavirus\ and C/h/i】na.Trump sa/y【s 】the outb】reak could h\av/\e been contained at its sou【r【ce and spared lives had the U\N health a】gency done a better 【job inv/estigatin【g reports comin\g out【 of China.Trump cl【aims th/e organisation failed \to carry】 out its ///&ldquo\/;bas【ic dut/y&r【dquo; and】 must 【be held accountable.Shrinki【n】g of UK economyEarlier o【n【 Tuesday th/e UK's /tax and spending watchdog/ has s/aid the British econ【o\my \cou【ld shrink\ by 】a record 35 percent】 by June. The bl】eak report come【s fro【m the\ Office for Budget Respo】nsibil/ity.Com/menting【 on the g【\overnment's resp\onse /to the crisis, Finance Minister Rishi Sunak sa\id the measures p】u【t/ i\n p\lace w/ere the \"right p/lan".View his news conference in the video p/l/【ayer aboveOffi】ci【al statistics on Tuesday showed t\/hat hun【dred】s of deaths in British car【e homes have not been in】cluded i【n】 govern【【ment f】igures -- which only /take\ account of death/s in hospita\ls. I】【t【 has led to crit/ic/ism that the eld/erly ar\【e being "airb\rushe】d \/ou】t".Sunak insist【ed that the country's【 battle against coronavi/rus was "n\ot a\ choice between health 【and economics". Other 【key \developments:The/ Internationa/l Mone】tary Fund (IMF) sai】d in its】 latest forecast t/hat the w【orld econo\my would suffer its worst year since the Grea\t Depression of the 1930s \-- and shrink by thre/e percent in/ 20/20.US Presiden】t Donald 【Trump has defende/d his administra/tion's handling 【of the【 pan【demic】, saying he has "to】ta【l power" t\o li】ft the lockdown\ if need be.France\ /and India hav\e jo/ined Italy in/ extending their nationwide lockdowns to stem the spread of the deadly 【nove\l coronav【irus】.These decisi【ons come as the/ number of infec\tions【 worldwide near the two mi/llion threshold. Nearly 120,000 people have【 now lost 【/th\eir lives 】to COVI/D-1/9】.】Foll\o】w all the latest updatesShare thi/s articleCopy/paste the a\rticle【 vid】eo embed \lin/k below:Copy】ShareTweetS】h【aresendShareTweetS/ha【res【endMo/reHi\de\ShareSendShareShareShareSe【ndShar/eSh\a/reYou might also like / / / Rising populism sto【kes disco\ntent but offers f\ew solutions to】 global thre【ats like COV\ID-1【9 ǀ View 】 【 【 / \ C/ould a ce】ntury-old met/hod 】help treat COVID-】【1 pa】tients? 【 】 \ \ \ \ 】 / How to s】tay healthy\ working from h】【ome, according to chiropractor\s\ 】 【 More aboutC】O】VID【-1CoronavirusEuro【pean Un\ionHot Topi】cLea/rn more about / Coronavir\u\s Hot TopicLearn more about 【 Coronavirus \ Brow/se【 tod】ay】9;s tagsJrZ0

OuuhT/ext siz【eAaAaTakin【g you on a jou【rne】y ac\ross t/he Yorksh/ire Dales an【d all【/ the way\ to Vanco【uver Is【land, Kate Fletcher&/【rsquo;s "Wild Dress" is an autob】iographica】l me】ander through the tende/r mom【ents wher/e clothing ha\s made her f/e【el 【embedde】d in nature. A Professor o【f su】stainability, design and【 fashi】on at the U\niversity of the Arts Lond/】o\/n; Fletch【er【 h\as】 been /a】t t】\he forefront of 【the\ c】/all for s\/ystematic change in /the fas【hion /industr【y.\ In her 【first col】lection of person【al writin】gs, \】Fletcher】 ha/s chosen t/o explore the complex and often art】ificially detached re】la/【t\ionship between the natur【al world a/nd/ what 【we\ wear.Fle/tcher looks at clothing as/ something m\ore e/ssential and far 【beyond its /si】mple【, modern, role as/ a dis】posabl【e commodity. It’s \no【t difficult to see that our c【ultural relationship with clothing has been【 】distorted by years of f/ast-movin【g/ \mo【de】rn /fashio】n t】rends but as she recou】nts the story of her【 【dad&rsquo/;s favourite jumper, there is a glimmer of some nostalgic, int】ergen/er【ational import\ance that breaks through/. Mending this dec【ade/】s-old piece of clothin/g using wool found 】in hedgerows and on fences she mus\es about this as a/ rebellious /act. “As I worked my lap felt w/arm,” she writes【, “Doing this felt like a way to live not】 j/u】st through the rules of 【modern society.&rdqu\o;Ch/arlie M\ee/chamIt’【s not just abo/ut rebell【ing \for the sake of reduci/ng w【ast/e, 】however. Fletcher rec】o【gnizes the】【 way t/hat modern out】do\or clothing i【mpos【es a kind of】 distance from the natural \world.【 The 】clothing we ch\/oose to wear becomes a divisio【n; 】farmworker vs lando【wner, recr\eatio/nal h/iker vs those \who work the land. A ne【ed for\ spe】/ci】fi【c, tec【h】no\log】ically advanced outdoor gear in b\right neon oil-based mat】erials 【is, Fletcher says, ju\st another in/dicat\ion of rampant cons\um\er \cult/ure.Th/e art installati【on teac】hing us to c【are for our/ forestsLivin/g Recomm【ends | A/ "vital tool】"\ for fighting the rising tide of si】ngle/ use plasticsL】\ivin【g Recommends 】| /No/ one is too s】mall to 【make a d【iffer】enceIt’s\ a v【ery d/\】i/fferent way to int【【roduce this/ message. Distan/t from the usual ev/ils of fast fa】sh/ion’s rapidly evolving aesthetics, she e】xp/lores the im\prac/tic/ali【ty of the always new in【 the/ face o/f the a\n】ci\ent /forces of the elements. Fletcher is【n’t preaching about all of the usual】 sust【ainab】le fa】/shion clichés but instead inviting you to think differently about how you\r/ garments can bring y】ou joy. T\he thrill o【f newness is fleeting 【but\ rich cultural relat\】】io】nships can and will【 last 【a lif//e\【time.Jack Gr\angeShunning the newness\ of n\/eoprene allows you to embrace /a\ more per/me\able【 exterior【. &/ldquo】;Once we\/&【rsquo;re there, we learn from the land and listen\ to the voic/es /of the b\irds and the \rain,” she writes, “We /give attentio】n to the unta【med parts of our【 world, in【】clud/ing that 【part in ourselves. [...] And this】 requires,】 at the least, that we make the \la】yers\ that【 \we build up 】ar【ound ourselves&【\mdash; some of wh】ich 】ar】e【 fashio【n in cloth—more permeable.&rdqu】o; Our clothing does\n&rsquo】;t alway】s have to /fo【rm】 a bar】】r【ier \between th】e inside and t】he outside, sometimes, whe】n your /&ldquo\;co】at&\rsquo;s wide sleeves grip\ onto\ t/h/\e lip o】f a gust&rdquo【】;】 o】r/ your &ldq】uo;trousers, wide-】legged act as a kite&rdq】u/o; it can \help you form \a connecti/on 】with na【tu/re.Kate Fletch/【er's Wi】ld Dress: Clothing a\nd the】 natural world is av\ailable from Uniformbooks, more \informatio】n can be fou\nd here.Share this articl/e M/ore 【from\ lifex8Mi

8q1XHow the EU stamped dow\n on de/c\ades of【 illeg\al【 fishing \in T\hai\landd64u

ilhMA\ctivists【 are】 raising funds to save Danish wooden 】【boat】sTiHO

Ug9DO【n t\【h【is wee】k’s Smart】 Regio【ns, we take a pl/unge i/n the European U/nion’s】 longest r\iver: the Danube. Since ancient【 ti】mes, the riverbed has see\n m】any chan【ges but some of its inhab【itants are in d/\anger. The Europ【ean Cohes/ion Polic\y //is providing a push to protect \the ri】ve\r’s ecosy【stem.The Danube is the second lo\ngest river in 】【Eu\ro【pe. \Its path 】can be t】ra\ced from\ Germany t/o the Black Sea. L\oved by many, the D/anube’s critical ecosystems a/re now being】 prote【cte【d and/ preserv\ed. Georg Frank】 is\ a biologist and coo】rdi/nator\ at the DANUBEPARKS network, an organ【isati\on \that p\rotects are】as】 around【 the ten count/ries crossed by t】he/ river.&ldqu/】【o;We have 【more than 900 islan【ds 【a\long t/he Danube […] of wh【ich【 147 islands which are absolutely natural and, in the 】frame of\ t】his /wild isl\and 【initiative, w】/e try to protect】 】- in particular 】/- these //【wild island/s covering se/veral /10,000 hectares."The Danube Park\s network is wo\rking to pre】ser】ve the\ basin of the 2885km river: 5,】00】0 animal species/ 】and 2000【 plants live alo】ng its shores./ /It has a budge/【t of 3 million eu【ros,/ of \which 2.【6 m/illion euros is covered by the E】U/'s Coh】esion P/olic\y.T\【he DANU/BEPARKS rep】resen【tatives pay particular attention to, what they c/all, fla【gship spe\cies. By preserving their habitat, they also prote/ct th【【e animals or 【plants l【iving there./Twenty years of work/ h\ave shown prom【ising re/sults in the res【toration of nat【ural environments. Euronews spok【e to【 Attila Fer/sch (the deputy】】 d\ire/ctor of th/【\e Fertö/;-Hanság/ national 】/park) about the result/s.“7/0-75% in the/ Hungarian Dan】ube b】io】tops/, D【anube habi【【tats, which were【 involved in this pr【oject are i】n good status. Probab\ly the】 other 25% of\ the D/anub/】e habitats are no】t critical, but】】 we【 hav/e to work 【【together".1212121212121】2Share this /articleCopy/paste the article /【video 【embed link be\low:CopyShar\eTwe】etSharesen【d\ShareTwee【】【tSha\/resendM】oreHideShareSendSh【areShareShareSendSha\reShareMore aboutEnvironmental pro】tectionFaun/a and FloraAustria / Brow/s\e today's\ tagsx9em

UytrCoronavirus/ latest: Donald【 Trump halts/ U/S payments to World Health /Organiz【a\ti】o】nWfz5

wR2zHow to become a 【】more sustain\able\ me【at eaterxWK6

iRsb'W【asteShark the new remotely controll【【ed 】device【 that removes plastic and floa】【】ting debris from wateraZQU

g083“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207Text sizeAaAaWalking】 along the shore of the Dead Sea give【\【s you a c\lear vision of how 【qui\/ckly【 na/ture \reacts to】 human intervention. The\ Dead S/ea h/as been dying for de\cades,\ and】 the result is \al/ready obv】ious.Nestled betwee】n Israel and the Palestinian T【erritories 】and /Jordan, /the Dead Sea has been le\aving its mark /【【on mankind since biblical times. Famous for its extreme sa】】linity, /an/ Israeli a】r/tist 【has even】 been i【nsp【ired by that and use t/he\ expanse as【 her stu】dio\ to create cry/stal art pi\eces.Since the histori【cal lake has be【en exploited by modern indus】try, the【 wate【r】 】level is【 g】radually lowering. T【he m【iner/al extraction and the diversio\n of the \Riv/er Jord【an&r\s】/quo;s/ water /have been\ big c/ontributors to the phenom】enon.】As the sp\ectacularly shrinki\ng wat\er level leaves it】s mar】k on the shore,\ d\angerous sinkholes appear al【ong the lake - the 】】result of \the br】iny wat/e\r r/ecedin/g unde【rgrou】nd. /In 199【0 th】e】re were a little 】over 100/ sinkholes, accordi\ng to the Geological/ Survey o\f Israel. Today the】re are more t/】h/an【 6,000. This led 【to the n】ecessary clo/【sure【\ of some s【hore seg【ments hence those tourist spots became ghost to】】wns.Click on th】e video above \to learn more ab】out what happens with the Dead/ S】【【ea.Share this【 article 】 More\ from plac/es 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsZCGU

bZlYCoronavirus/ latest: Donald【 Trump halts/ U/S payments to World Health /Organiz【a\ti】o】nfB31

3VRR\Te】xt sizeAaAa/A s\how【case of t】ho/usands of completel\y sustainable f\abrics is co】ming to London, or】ganiser The Sustainable【 Angle has announced.【The not-for-profit o/r/g/anisation has been a rele】ntl】\ess/ 【s【upporter of innovative/ lower\ carbon solutions to fashio/n&rsquo【;s biggest problems【 since 2010 and hopes that this/ \ev/ent 】will encourag/e ev/en/ more /designe】】rs and creators【 to adopt 】respo/n【sible solutions.】This will \be the ninth e/dit】ion of the Fut】ure Fabrics Expo which is the l\argest sho【wcase of sustainable fabrics of its k】ind. /With each f\abr【ic, informa/tion about where it has com/e from and 】/the/ environm\e/nta【l footpri/nt\ of【 its】 manufacture w\il/l be/【 provided. I【ncreas【ing tr\an/sparency in【 how our clothing i/s made is on】e\ way to he/lp bot【h designers and co【nsumers to 【make responsi\ble choice【s.Materials /o\n show will】 include 】the i/ncreas\i【ngly popular TENCEL Lyoce\ll and Modal as well as【 several fa/brics th】at take an innovative approach to post-cons【】umer recycling. Wi\th fashion waste /firm【ly in】 【the spotl【igh【t this season, there is a real dri【ve from /\consum】ers towa/rd more circular soluti【ons\】.These m\ode【rn approa\】ches will be e/xhibited alongside co/mpanies that ch】ampion t/rad\it\ional sustainable ma】te/rials/ like line/n and bast. Although less common i/n modern designs, these ancient f【】ab/rics are biodeg】radable and water-efficient. 【The plant fi【b【res fr】om 【】【whi】ch\ they are grown can ev\/en sequester C【O/ from the atmosphere.Founders of the expo, 】The【 Su】stainable Angle, hope t】o change the fash/ion i】ndustry \for the bet/ter s【o that, instea/d of stri】ppin/g resources an/】d p/oll\uting environments, \it can【 have a 】po/sit/i/ve impa【ct on n\ature an\/d the communities that 】\make o】ur cloth/es.Read/ More | W\【hat is Tencel? \T//h【e s\ustainable fabric e/v【eryone is 】talking /aboutClaire\ Bergk/am\p, Global Director of S【us【ta】inability and Innovation, Stella McCartney (left) in/ 【convers\ation/ with Orsol/a de Castro, Co-foun】der of Fashion Revolution】 (right)【\.Suzanne Plunkett /The 【Sustaina】\ble AngleAs well as showing off materials th\at designers can u】se t】o /decrease the e】nviro】nmental impact of t\heir own 【de】signs, the F/uture】 F【abrics\ Expo will also h【o\st panels to h\elp】/ ed/ucate atte\n】de/es and fac\ilitate discussion between industry exp【e【rts. Panels for\ the ninth Future F【abrics Expo will b/e】 focus\ed around r【egenera】t\i】ve, circul/ar ap】proaches to sust\ainable des【ign and how fashion can be a “powerful force /for positive change”.Future\【/ Fashion ExpoS\uzanne Plunkett /The 【Sustainable AngleAt 】a /p】an/el at last 【year’s event, Claire Bergkamp, Glob/al Director of Susta】】】inability and \Innovatio】n at Stella\ McCart/ney emphasised t\he value【 of eve\nts like t\his i】n helping to eradicate unsustainable mat】er\ial\s from t【he【 fashion in【du\/stry; “We have to \repl/ace them with i/nnova】t\ive, sustainable alternatives. The o/】ther half of inno】vati】on in the【】 future of fabrics has to be about rethinkin】g t【he syst】em【s 【tha】t we /have now…/【How can we find lower-im【pact ways o\f【】 】creating things?”.Part of the /Expo last year al】】so in【cluded two curated areas dedic\ated to fashion bra\nds fully embraci\ng responsib/le s】our\cing and circularity in thei【/r 【collections. New collaborati/on/s【 between leading designers and companies c/reating inno】vative new material\ technologies are the ideal outcome from this event.Suzanne Plunkett /The 】Sustainable A】ngle【The \【event will take place from the 29th-3】0th Januar/y 2020 at\ Victoria House, Bloomsbur\y Square, 】L】ondon. Tick/et registratio/n f/or de【【signers/ and brands /can be/ found h\er【e.Share this article \ 】More /from l\ifeSCxa

3Fc3Text si】zeAaAaThere’s no \doubt about it: /art, in its many forms, is so \much mor/e than a \kind /of s】elf-【express】ion. It 】can often be【 a force for good and much-ne/eded \chan【ge. From photography t】o lively discussion and jaw-dropping footage,/ t\hese are【 the exhibitions and documentar/ies on 【climate change around the \world/ to have on your r\a/d【ar f【or May】 2019.A】r\t + Climate/ = Change FestivalWhere】: Various, Melbourne, Australia\When: Until 19 May 2019This exciting initi\ative is a month-long festi】val 】l/ooking at the way】s 】in w】hich a】rt can make\ a diffe/rence in the】 discussion around sustainabi/li】ty and climate change. This i】s/ a s【eries of curated \exhibitions, artist t【alks and lectures w【ith some o【f【 the most p\romi】nent environment and climate ch】a\nge 】scientists, psycho\lo\gists and res【earchers】 /t\hat aims to open \】【up di/s\cussi】on】 on the wa】ys in\ whi\ch art ca】n work a/【\s an a】cti】vism【 to\o【l. This will be running in Victoria,\ Australia, but /man】y of the talks will be\ filmed, mea【ning you don’t】 have to be in the country to get involve/d wi/th this excit/ing moveme\nt.More infoClimate Change: The\ F\/acts with David AttenboroughNet】work: BBC iPla【yerWhen: Ava【ila\ble /from Ap】【ril 2019If you’ve yet to w/atch \t\his grou】ndbr【eaking BB【C /docu\ment【ar】y, now&rsquo\;s the ti\me. Presented b】y\ t】he world&rsq\uo;s】 most/】【 】resp】ected wi\ldlife doc】ume\ntary m【aker, Dav】id Attenborough cuts through the fake news】 and confu/si】ng statist\ics\ to/ bring 【us the tru】th about what is \act\ually happening to】 \our environment/\. In th】is 】hour-long progr\/amme, issues s】uch as/ sp/ecies extinction【s, deforestation and extreme wea\ther a【re all tackled. Though it i【s som【ewh\at 】harrowing - and worryin】g - to w/atch, there is an /o/verall message of h/op】e:】 that we ha【ve the pow\er/ \to t【urn the tid\【e o/【f 】cli】mate chan/ge /once】 an【d for all.More infoAltered OceanWhere【: The Royal Phot/ographic【 Society, Bristol, U】KWhen: U/ntil\ 23 】June 2019According to statist【ic【s, approxim\ately 8 million\/】 pieces of 【plastic find 【】their way into \the ocean every day. Da/vi/d Attenboroug/h brought th/e i\ssue of p\lasti【c pollu\tion to the forefront b】ack in 2017 with h/is BBC documen】t\ary, Blue】 Plane【t II 【and it has now become one the major climate change /discussi】ons】 between cou\ntries and local communiti/es. 【I/】】n 【this 【pho【to series, Mandy Barke【r has doc【】】ume】nted\ her findings as】 a ph【otog】rapher travelling the world. Comb】ined wit【h resea【【r\ch n【o/tes, /sk/etchbooks and scient/ific s\amples, it combines both art andscience to p【resent a we\l/l-rou【nded exhibition that forces th\e viewer 】to confront t【he realities our oceans are fa\c\i/ng.More infoHuman/ Natu/re】W【here: Muse【um of World Cultu】re, Gothenburg, SwedenWhen: Until M\ay 2020Bringing toge\/ther 【a collection /o/f】 poignan】t photographs】, w/orks o【f 【art an】d other a】\rchived materials, the Museum of Worl/d Cul【ture has curated an exhib【\iti【on that explores the way h/uman lives ar【e di/\rectly affecting th】e planet. Looking \at/ everything from the【 things we \choose to repair and care fo\r versus those we sim/pl\/y consume, as well as sci\entific results in/ envi】ronme\ntal p【sy】chology, it&rsq】uo;s a /fascinat\ing s\tu【dy of th】e relationship between people and the \planet we call ho/me. T【hough it doe【s feed t【h\e visitor some uncomfortable truths,【 the overall m【/essage is one of //hope】, she\dding light on m/a【ny of the positive initiati/\ves tackling to redu/ce o\u\r impact and offering p/racti/cal tips that c【a【n be taken away and in\corpora【ted into 【daily life.Mor】e i【nfoCarmig【nac P\hoto】j//ou】rna】lism Award: Arctic/: New FrontierWh】ere: Sa/atch/i Gal】lery, Lond【on, UKWhen: Until 6 】M\a【y 2019Photographers Yuri Kozyrev an/d Kadir van Lohuize】n have won the S\aatchi 】Ga【ll/e\ry&rs】quo;s ninth Carmignac Photojournalism Award for the\ir project on the Arctic. Widel】y view】ed as 】one of the most enda\ng【ere】d 【ar】】eas in the world, the Arctic【 】is home to 】the Nenets - a nomadi【c】 group that make the yearly m/igration a\cross Nort【h【ern】 Russia. F【o/r \the first t【ime e】v\er, \their journey was i/nterrupted by melt/ing frost in 2018. K】ozyrev f】ollowed【【 their progress this year and bore witness 【to the impact【 t/hat global/ warming is h【avin\g on /their lifest/yle. Lohuizen,】 on the other h】【and, /visited various part\s of the【 w\orld,】 meeting with sc】ientists, envir\onmenta】lists and vulnerable com】munities /to find out ab】out the reality of/ 【what is happening to our m/elti】ng ic【e ca\p\s.\ Each photo in t\he e/xhibition shows the sta\rk reality facing t】his part o【f the world thank//】s to t\ourism, the depleti/on of gas an】d natural resources and heavy ocean p【oll/ution.More infoWords: Bianca /Barr\attShare this arti/cle 【 / More f】\rom lifeFSyL

sWpsSaving the Sey】che\ll/es: plas\t\i【c 【washes up \on sho】res/ hardly t【ouched b】y \m\ankind9VmA

Uy8ZText sizeAaA\a&/ldquo;/It’s \unfa【ir t\o say they are jumping 】on t】he ba/n/dw/\agon, 】natur【e documentaries have always \been motivate\d by conse\rvation.” 【Sa【t in his office at University Col】le/ge L/ondon, lec】ture【r in/ sci/ence communication, Dr Jean-Baptiste Gouyon\/ expla】ins to /me \how nature documentaries/ have come \full circle by\ embracing th\【eir roots in envi/ronmentalism.【 In the early days of TV【, he reveals, f\ilms a\bout/ animals\ helped】 to estab【lish th\is brand new medium【 as 【/a source】 of trustworthy informa/tio/n. Docum】enting and catalo【】guing biodiversi】t\y, they told 【timeless stories of 】creatures no\/t s【o dissimilar to u/s.“Befo【\re \Attenborough was Atten/borough, it w/as common to see scientists 【at work,” Gouy/on says, but things began t\o change】/ as the \century wore on. With the i】nc】\reasing doom and gloom of environmen/tal cris/is loo【min【g ov\er the general 【population, film【makers rejec【ted 】stories abou【t wh\at was】 reall】y h\appenin】g to 【th/e pla【net. “\The【re 】was a documented reluctanc【e to eng【age with envi【ronmental is】sues, they d】idn&rsqu\o;/t】 wa\nt to push audiences 】away.”D】avid Attenbo【rough \makes a spee】ch /at /a cerem】on】y f/or \t/he\ naming of the RRS Sir 【D】avid Atte【nboro\ughAsadour Guzelian/ASSO【CIATED 【PRES【\/SAsadour GuzelianDuring the【 1990s, however, things began to change. “A s【hift in the cultural context has happe】ned and t】here is more acceptance \that 【we are in a bad sit\uation.” Having been bombarded with years of ongoing【 catastrophe, pe/o/ple had becom【e too w//】ell informed to keep tolerating a\【 w】a】te\red-down /version of【 the t【ruth. It has beco/me imposs】ible to ignore /he】/ says, “the state of【 the】 \plane/t i【s wh/at /it i【s.&【rdquo;Now 】we&rs】【qu\o】;re hooked. 14.1 million people watched\ the BBC&/rsquo;s【 27 series, Blue Planet II mak\ing it the】 most-watch【ed 】T\V prog】\ramme in Britain that 】year, /a\ccordin\g to the BBC. Natural history】 persona】/\li】ties lik\e David Attenborough have 】bec/ome big 【stars, successfully\ transf】/orming from amateur ecologists to/ folk hero【es for those p】lagued by eco-anxiety. We have beg\un to recognis【\e the p【ower of /t\he e】nvironme/nt/al film and\ its potential make us \think a lot harder a/bout t/ackling proble/ms lik【e plasti】c pollution.Waste from wors】h【i//p: solvin\g Indi\a's unique river pollution p】【roblemWATCH | Shrink【ing pelican b/reeding grounds restored after BP\ 【oil spillSerbia will plant 1 billion tre】e\s\ in【 o【rder to reach net zero t\ar\get by 205【】0The 】power of movi/ng pictu【res“There is no doubt that film as a mediu】m has massive power to elicit/ an emotional rea\ct/ion,】&rdq】uo; says\ Gouyon\, “but there isn’t 】really any】 hard evidence to/ prove this yet.&r】dquo【; More s/o than the\ writt】en w【ord, these documentaries 】seem to pique our interest/ in the\ p/lanet and poten】\ti/ally even d】rive/ 】us to take action. A sur/\vey of U】K superm/arket/ shoppers found th【at 88】 per】ce\//nt o【f people【 who watc】hed Blue Plan】et II\ had \changed their behaviour \as a resul【t.After watching th\e \series\, Da\río Fern&aa\cute;ndez-Bellona, a postdoctoral rese【archer at Univers】ity College 】Cork, noticed th【at th/e programme w】as consistent/ly \tr\ending on twitte/r the evening】 it aire】d. He started to wonder just how much these\ 】docum【entaries are able to affect our behavio\ur. Using 3000The Ol\d Port, Mars】eille\’s popular wa】terfro/nt, h\ides a dirty secret.Electric scooter【s, tires a【nd pla】s】tic bottles litter 【【the seafloor.Annual clean-up operationEver【/y 】【ye】ar, volunte/e/rs gat/her/ to clean up some of /the mess. Hundreds of scuba divers collect th/e \rubbish, whic】h is t【h/en【 sor\ted\ an【】d rec\ycled, or otherwise safely dispose/d】 of,【 by 】l】oc\al activists.&ldqu】o;We find a 【lot of【 scooters, ra【i【ling【s, cans, bottle【s,” says Angie Espine【l Caño【n, 】a volun【\t/eer with// Team 13. &ld【quo;The goal【 i【sn&rsqu/o;t just to clean up, it&rs/quo;s also to 】ra】】ise awareness】.&r/dquo;“Last year, we recover【ed 91【m3 /of \waste,” s/ays I\sabelle P/oi】tou/, anoth】er volunt【eer f】】rom the Merterre Associa/tio\n. “The year【 before it】 was 13】1m3, so \that’s a decrease of 40m/3. This/ year, j【udging \from what I c/an s【ee】 and my experience, \I’d say it&rsquo】;s les\s again."We fin】d a lot /of scooters, rail/ings, \cans and bot/tles. The goal isn’t just to clean up, it【’s also to raise awareness. 【 Angie Espinel Cañ/【on / Vo【luntee】r, Team 13 】 With smu\rfs 】for ma】scots, the\ event】 i【s】 a part of the "EU Be】ach Cleanup" campaign -\ h【elping to raise aw//areness of the Europe/an response /to th】e\ marine p】ol【lut/【i【on pro\blem【. One o/f【 the divers is Alai\n Dumor/t — 【the EU’s representa/tive in Mars/eille.“Some 】waste is potentially 】recyclable,&rd/quo; says Dum\ort【. “But 【unfortu\nately 【【not/ sin\【gle-use objects, which go strai\ght in the bi/n. That's why from 2021 the /EU /will 】be banni\】n/g all this kind of single\-use utensils &\mdash; pla】tes, s】tir【rers, cotton bu【ds, /and so on - all the things yo/u fr【】equently find on be】ac】】he\s will be banned.”Mos】t ocean waste co/mes from urban areasAn imp\ortant aspect of the campaign is public outre/ach. Mi】【llions 】of tons of/ waste - mostly coming from u/rban are\a】【s - 】en】d /up in \the ocean 】every/ yea\/r】/.】 It’s been calc\ulated that on every square】 mile /of ocean, thous【ands of piec】es o\f rubbish \are floating./“The fig\ures【 【show that【 80% of marine li\tter originates on land,” ex\pl】ains Olivier Bianchimani/, th】e dir】ector of Septentri\on 】Environneme\nt. “It'【s eithe【r w/ashed away【 by 】/rivers or dis【carded/ d【irectl】y into/ the sea. As you can imagi\ne, it wasn't wind that brough】t r/ailings and bicycles /here.”At \over 【7【0 beach cle】an\up eve【nts organised t\his year b【y the EU a【nd the UN, almost 40 /000\ participants collect\ed ar】ound 】850 ton/s of waste &md\ash; from Camb【/odia to Haiti - and Argenti/】na to】 No【rway.The】 figu/】res show 】\】that 80% of ma/【rin\e litter ori】ginates【 on la/nd. 【 【 【 【Ol【ivier Bianchimani 【 【 Director, Septent】r/ion】 Environnement 【 &ldqu】\o/;This needs to be s/een i/n a【 much broade\r c【ontex】t,&rdq【uo; says Dumort. \&ldqu\o;Ot】herwi【se t\】his would be a loca【l event,【 and you’d be asking \wha\t's】 Europe go【t to do with it. Europe's involved/ precisely because this is a globa】l problem, and 】requi】res a whole s/eries 】o】f a/ct/ions and laws a】t an i】nternational l\/e】v】el.”The Euro/pean Union is\ leading the globa】l 】fight \aga/inst marine li】tter.【 Be//sides its 【policies curbing single-use p\【lastics【 and re/ducing waste from lost fishing gear, the /EU has earmark】/ed\ €350 million for research an【d deve【lopment.Mini-cata】maran scoops】 debris from t\he wa】ter\One/ of the EU-supported tec/hnologies is WasteSha【rk,【 devel【oped in Rotterd】am. A re\motely contr\olled 【m【in\i-catamara】n removes plastics /and othe【r floating deb【ris from【】 the surface of t/he water. Its sen【sors can monito【r pollution levels and \other environmental indi\cator】s. It's electri\call/y powered, emission-\free and ca\n collect hundreds of】 kilos of rubbish/\ at a time.“What we'/re】 trying to do is 】create a \small /enough vessel that will 【get into ti】ght spaces w\here waste col\lect\s, particularly in ha/【rbours and ports, and s/top all【 that waste bei【ng taken out into the greater ocean," says Richard Ha【rdiman, the 【founder on Ranmarine T\echn】ologi/es, the startup behi】nd WasteShark.【The bas】ic function of the WasteShar【/k is very simple. But \ins】ide, it【's a】lways changing &mdash】; 【we【're al【ways trying to make it lighter, mo\re eff/icient/, ea】s\ier to do maintenance on. \ /T】\essa Despinic \ 【 / WasteS【hark】 Design Engineer \ 【 】 / \Ranmarine alrea【d【y has c】us】t\omers in s\everal countries. Enginee【rs ar【e workin\g to make the d\evice\ ful【ly auto\nomous — so it】 can\ c】ollect litter and br\ing 】it back t/o the /recharging station /wi【t【h the need for a pilot.“The】】 basi】c \【【fun【ction】 】of the Wast\eShark is very simple,” says 】d】esi/gn engineer Tess\a Despinic. 】&ldq【uo;It just s】wi】m\s around and collec\t\s【 【tras【h from the su】rface. B【u\/t inside, it's alwa\ys chang/【ing — we're【 \always trying to mak//e it 】\lighter, more effic】ient, easie】r to 】do maintenance\ on. And we're also【 building a\n a【utonomous version t/hat will swim \aroun】d according】 to/ waypo/ints that yo\u give it. So w【e're a\lways wor【king on th】at and】 maki】ng it better.】"I\n the near future\, the de/velop/e】【rs envisage swarms 【of their rob【ots \picking up floa/】ting rubbi/【sh.“I have\ /a】 vision in my hea【【d that keeps m\e】 going,” says Hard/iman. “Tha/t is what we'd be sitt/ing in a\ c\ontrol room an】d from our site, we could see whe】re e/very drone is acros【s th\e planet, how many are【 operating, how 【/much waste is bei\】ng caught — an/d actually see the real impact 】of 】that these things are ma【king around the wor】ld."Technical s【【olutions an】d clean-up campaigns are important. But the simple way】 to keep our se【as】 \hea】lt【hier is to\ drop less litter — a】】nd】 tha【t’s】 a lesson for childre\n and/ adults alike.121212121Share\ t/his articleCopy/past】e the a】rticle v\】id】eo 【embe【d li】nk below:CopyShareT/weetSharesendS/har【/】eTweetSharesendMo/reHideShareSendShareSha/reShareSendShareShareYou migh】t also like \ / 】 Wha/t/’s killing/ ou\r und】erwater ecosystems? / 【 Mor\e 【abo\【utContamination of wate【rEnvironmen\tal prote】ctionSea Most viewe/d 】 \ 】 W\hat influence on \climate is 】the coron/avirus】【 】\lockdown really having? 】 【 【 \ The new AI system saf/egu】/【arding pre/mature /babi】es\ from infect\io\n 】【 Messenger/ RNA: 【the mo/【lecule that may teach our bodies to beat c/ancer 【 】 / \ 【【 【 【 Apple a】】nd Google /say they\'ll wor\k toge\ther to trace spread of cor】onaviru】s vi\【a smartphones / Ho/w EU fundin/g is ch\anging the f/ace of Lat】vian innova/ti/on / Brow【se today's ta/gs twee\ts and figu】res for v//isit/s to the Wiki/pedia 】pages 】of the animals f/eatured in【 the series, he a/nalysed this data to see what, i/f any\, /patter\ns of behav】iour were influenced by watching the show.His rese\】arc【h fo\und /that 【just 6 percent 【of th\e actual programme 【wa【s about envir【onmental issues a】nd/ a m/【er\e 1 【percent of tweets me/ntioned these t\o】pics.【 T\hese figur【e/s/ didn&rs/quo;t/ look promisi\n】g. Docu】mentar】i】es clearly a\ren/&rs】quo】;t/ usel/ess for conservation, howe/ver, as they \al\ter ou【r perception of wi\ldl【if】e in other 【ways. The Wikipedia pages for each of the【\ animals that appe\ared 】\in episodes of Blue Plane/t【 2 had an annual spike】 【/in visits imm【ediat【ely f】】ollowing the【 broadcast of/ the s【how. Ev\e/n this s/mall connection with nature could be enough to create 【an awa/ren/ess crucial to avoiding /【an exti/nction.One of the mos\t successful elem\en/ts of the moder\n nature】 docume/ntary is t\he &ld//quo;ma【king-of&r【dquo; segment. Usually a short section】】 s【eparate【 from the main show t】h\at reveals how/【 s【ome】 of the scenes we】】re shot, the “making-】of&】rdq【uo;\ le【ts us s【ee behind】 the \scenes【.【】 It a\lso helps to break dow/n the】【 i\nvisib【le wall bet/ween the viewer and t】h/e animal】s. “Films show /nat\ure with】out \humans,/ not \as somethi】ng t/o en】gag】e with,【&】rdquo; explains Dr Gouy】on, “【the cameraman can be a role model for ordinary people \and express more emot【ional responses.” It h/elps the audien/ce】, /usu】ally tuc】/ked a/way in their living room in increasing\ly u\rban\ised societies, to engage w\ith a world they hav/e bec】ome】 distant from.D/ocumenting the fut】u/】reEngagem【ent is un【do\u【\btedly the best /way to get us to\ care\ more ab/out the state of the planet. I【f we】/ want】 t\o mak【e film\s mor\e effective in the future, Gouyo】n 【【【s【ugges】ts, we nee/【d to encourage that en\gagement by giving the came【ras to local populations to document their own experience/s. &ld/q】uo;We can’t go by the impe】rialist model of Brito/n’s going\ and watching 】wil\dlife.”Portrayals of enviro】nmental i【ssu【/es can have【 different\ effect\s in diff\erent countr【ies.\UnsplashWe /respond 】far b/etter, \it seems, to films about environm【【ental issues that resonate /with our own \life \experie\n】ce\. \A good exa】/mple of this/ is】 the international re/sponse to the d【ocumentary T/he Co\ve.】 The 2009 Oscar Award/-win/ning piece about do\lphin hunting/ 】in Taiji, Japan cause【d indign/【ant outrag\e amon】g west】ern audien】ces. Its thriller-style tr/e【atment of ‘uncove/ring&【rsquo; the practice using spy-cams didn&/rsquo;t/, however, go down we】ll \with/ audiences in t/he \co/\untr【y【 wh】ere\ it was shot an【d many show【ings/ were met with protests.This k【ind of document/ary c/l/early raises a】wareness but\, with\i\n the communities a】ble to acti\vel/y change pr【actices har\mful to the en/vir\onment it rarely has the same impa】ct. Despite /already 】】having risen to astronomical levels o\f popularit】y, there【 is still a lot of scope for t】h\ese programm】es to do more 【fo/】r conservation. Choos【ing to cha】mpion l\oca/l voices co/uld spell the end for popular ec【o-h/eroes like David Attenborough, but it m【ight【 just 【be the kind of convincing many peop\l/e n【eed to take action on cl/i【ma【te change.Share th/\is article M\ore /from l】ifeab13

1.XtuPText s】izeAaAaBlack /cavi【ar was \a delicacy alread【y back i\n the 】】days of Gen\ghis Khan in the\ 12’s. In the 1550&rsqu\】】o;s】, Fra/ncois Rabela\is called it/ the finest pre-main-course/ tre\at out there. The kings and the tsars【 of Euro\pe】 enjoyed th\i】】【s\ fine food throughout the centuries. I【n our days, the roe of stur\geon is synonymous with luxurious living on 】televis】ion (think James Bond) and】 in real life.Getting the c】aviar, h/owever, is in】herently unsustainab\le: to get the fish eggs, f\e【male fish a】re hauled out【 of the waters s【hortly before they are me/ant to spawn and 【sliced open for t/hei/r row, which r】esu/lts in their death. So it is【 hardly a surprise that the s】【tu【rgeon’【s numbers h/a【ve been in an ala\rmingly rapid de【cline, so much so that in【 2001 a UN conventio/n banned fishing sturge\on in \its natu\ral habit/at altogether.A young sturgeon \fishK【asperskianTh】e key wo/rds are &ldq\uo;in its natural habitat&rdq\uo;. The ban/ made the br【ightest/ minds in bio/logy thin】k of \w】ays t【o get /】t【he female sturgeon’s precious cargo without bre【ak【ing the/ law. To circum\vent/ this piece of legislation, the most ob\vious \method was 】t\o cr/】eate fi【sh farms, whic\h technically do not /constitute a nat】ural environment. Such fish farms are quite 【c】ommon in China a/n】d slightly less so in Russia and Nort】h Amer\ica. B【ut to get this 【caviar to th\e】 European market 】with/out【 it \rottin\g, C】hinese pr【】oducers are【 forced to 】use/ /che/mical preservati\ves, which a/re banned/ i】n Japan a\nd in the US – b【ut 【not in Euro【pe.I\f you】&rsqu/【】o;re a fan of 】the delicacy, he/re&rsquo\;s /the good news: there is a h【andful of b/lack caviar producers \/out t【here/ that【 】are\】 \do\ing it【 sustainably &ndash\】; without killing the fis/h – thanks to a method wh\ereby\ the eggs are “mas】saged&【\】rdquo\; out right before spawn\ing. The/ sligh/tly 【worse news is that】 tho【se fish eggs】 /are pa\steu【rized, meaning the end product is not fresh but boil【ed.Luckily,【】 one produc\/er stan/ds out in 】par\t/icul//ar. 【/Swiss-based Kasperski【an purc/hased the right to use a 【technology pat\en/t\ed by Russian bi/ologist Li】liya Kop\ylenko and ar】e the o【nly produ\c\er 【in the world that provides discernin【】/g foodies “caviar\ with life”, w【hich is sustainable, /et【hical/ and as fresh a\/s it can be】】\ all at the sam/e t【ime. Th】e company wa/s founded in 2014 by 【Nes【tle】&\rsquo;s C/【EO Peter Bra\beck-Letmath】e and his【 long-\time friend Konst\antin Sidorov.Konstan\tin 【Sidoro【v (secon/d \from righ\t) at an\ eventKasperski】an“Producing】\ h】igh qual/i】ty bla】ck c/aviar in a sustainable 】way, withou】t killing th】e/】 fish, is e】xtremel】y co【mpl\ex and costly. The difficulty lies not s【o much in ki【lling or【 not killing the fish, but rather in how to process 】the fish eggs a【fterwards to gu\/arantee 】their f/reshness without r/】esort/in/g to the use 【of ch/emicals,” Konstantin Sidorov explained.Fresh/ caviar 【is a live【 prod】uct, 【much like oysters, so you cannot \keep it 【fresh for long. One of t/he biggest problems【, accordin\g to K【onsta/ntin,【 is that tra\ditio\nally/ the p】eak season f\o/r black caviar consum\ption is aroun\d【 the tim\e of C【hristmas and New Yea【r but the s\turg\eon 【usually spawns in \late】 s】prin\g, ar】ound May. There is a \speci【a【l vacuum te【\c\hnol】ogy that c】an k】eep t/he caviar fresh up【 to three months witho/ut havi/ng 】to process i】t or add any kind of pre】servatives /but that bri【ngs \us 【only to August - \still a 】way aw】ay from the /holiday season.The paten】ted technolo\gy used by Kasperski【an \at their fi【s】h fa/rm allows for to\】tal control of】 the\/ fish&rsq【u/o;s environment: what \it eats【 (a factor tha/t can/】 rea】lly affect【【 the】 qualit/y \of the ro【e】), as well as the lig/ht and the tem】p/erature, meaning they can simulate late spring in【 September by\ increas】ing the\ wat\er t】empera\ture and amount of light.\ And【 thus【 c/】onsumer【】s ha\ve fresh 】and su【staina/ble caviar just in time for the \holidays. View this p/ost o】n InstagramThe\ KASPERSKIAN \Cavi\ar with Life is simpl\y】 unique】 ! #Kasperskian #CaviarWithLif【e #S\wissMadeA post s【hared by KASPERSKIA\N (@kas】per【ski\an_cavia】r) o【n Oct 31, 2018 at /1/1:10am PDT“The pool w/e use is an incredibly complex 【structure so th【e】\ costs of the【 te】chnology and main/tenance are very high, which【 reflects on the price of t】he end \product. \Quality product 【can&rs\quo;t be cheap by defini【tion./ And with w\ealth also 【comes a/ certain desire to consume co/nsciously, which means】 that】 our c/u】stomer】s are re/ady to spend more on【 a produ/ct t/hat d\i/【【d no】t cost the f\ish its l\ife. U】nfor】tunately, in our 【day and 】ag】e it&rsq/uo;s easier 】\to k【/ill a life rather th【an sav/e it so we f\eel a\ moral responsibility to sho\w that that needn&rs】quo;t always be the case,” Konstantin c/larified.The d\ecision to /b】ase p\r/oductio\】n in Sw】itzerland/ w/as\ rather/ o/bv/ious for Kons/【tantin and Peter. This country ha\s th/e h/ighest quality con【trol and als】【o rigid regulation【 w】hen it comes to animal welfa\r\e.&ld】quo;Switzerla/nd is t/he only /place that bans b【oiling lobst\ers alive】,/ f】or examp】le. \We receive weekly checks that ar【e very serio\us and thorough】【【. Th】is creates a trust in S\wiss product/s and this /is also】 wh/y our 】product is/ more expensi\ve. We【 cou/ld\ have based our /production in Russia】, which in the minds of 】most is 】t/he h\ome/ of black caviar, but \no one would\ trust that we use sustaina【ble and /ethical methods t/o extract/ it,” Konstantin said. Vie\w this pos/t on InstagramA lunch of dre/ams at Cuck\oo Sushi Club in Zer】mat【t with some Alaska/n Crab Roll with Caviar and Ma【ndar/in Snow/, Lan【goustine Roll with Truffle Sno】w and fin【\al】ly Kasp/erskian Caviar with Life/ ! #Kasperskian #CaviarWi/t【hLife #Sw/issMadeA post shared by KASPER\SKIAN【 (@kaspe\【rskia/n_caviar) on Dec 30, 2【018 at 10:02am PSTBlack caviar /in Zermatt, Switze】rlandI\n a/ddition to the commitment to /the fish’s welfare, \/Kasperskia【n aims to reduc\e【 its impac\/t on the envi/ro】n/ment b\y producin】g \its own e】lectricity \t/hrough so【lar panels and trea/ting /al【l water\s to preserve【\ the\ lo\cal wild fauna and f/lora.Over the years, the caviar producer has made friends in high place】s【 and partner\ed up 【w/ith esteemed\ brands such \as LV】MH, Dom Pérignon an/d Christie】&rsq】/u/o【;s. Aside fro\m ap\plying susta【ina【ble methods/ 【to bl】ack caviar producti】on, Kasperskian also spon\sors/ cha\rit【y】 events lik/e Russian super 【mod【el Natalia Vodionova’s N】aked Heart Gala d/in/ners 【and the】 M\onte Carlo Gal\a\ for the Global Ocean.At the moment, thos】e wh【o wan/\t to t【aste the upscale\ treat can\ find it/ in S】wiss stores like 】Globus【 and \Migros, Swiss sk】i resorts like Zermatt and St. \Moritz\ or 【London clu【bs/ and restauran【ts】 lik【e 67 Pall Mall【, 】/Ocean House, Marivan\na\,【 Bea】st and a f/ew others. View this post o/n /InstagramK】\asperskian C【aviar at 【Mari Vanna Restau/rant (@mar】ivannalondon) in L【ondon Knightsbr】idge. #Ca\/viarWi\thLife #MarivannaA \p】ost shared b\y /KASPERSKIAN (@kasperskian_cavia/r) o【n\ Dec】 7, 2018 at 1/0:/12am】 P【STKaspers】kian caviar i\/n Lon\don's Marivanna\ 【restaurantShare this articl/e / More from wellnessVHQy

2.xSScTe】xt s/izeAaAaWith a vie【【w to r\】ai\se awareness of the damaging i】mpact of carbon emissions produced from fly【ing, the UK are planning to introduce a tax to of【fset【 emissions. This &lsqu/o;carbo【n\ charge’ added to flight/ ticket pr【/\ices would/ fund eco-f/riend】ly pro/jects, like p】lanting\ t】rees to red/uce【 CO2 levels in o【ur/ a【tmosphe/re./ T】his sche】me would hopefully /encourage air passengers【 t】o fly le】\s/s】 frequently and to be aware o\f the ef/fect/ of t】ransport emis】】sions/ on th/e planet. But, do we ne/ed to【 f/ly【 to /a new destination to have an enric/hing summer holiday? \Can we have a real brea】k【 f【rom daily 【/life and n/ot \fly to a faraway de\stination? We【 /believe\ you abso/lutely】【 can and the】 /holi【day of d//r【e/ams you're lo\oking for, ma】y 【just be waiting for you in t/he countryside.The menta/l h】\ealth charity Mind state tha】t, &l】【/dq\u】o;spending ti【me in green spaces or bringing nature into your everyday life can】 benefit both your menta【l and 】/physical we/ll【being&rdquo/;, /so how can/ you have flying free ho【liday that prov\id】es you with all the benefits of being a\ro/und natur】e in the countrysi\de?Tran\sp/ortWhat are the no-fly alternatives?You/ may just gain a lot from the increasingly/ popular conce】pt of slow 【travel an】d f/eel a sense of joy as you 【me/ande】r through sites /【of natura\l beauty】 t【o y【our 【destin【ation.You could always 】sail the seas \on a ferry t】o\ ne】arby 【countries like Fran】ce, Irel】and a\nd \】Holl\and if the idea of a staycation doesn&rs\quo;t float your boat... To get \/to those tra】nqui【l\ spots\ where you can immerse yourself in nature【 why 】not\ rent a【/ \camper va\n wit】h Yescapa if 【you&【rsquo;re not a car owner. Cr\uising on a v\a【n trip would not on/l\y a】llow you t\o take all your home/ comforts w】ith you】/, but it \would a【lso give you 【the freedom to travel far a【n\d wide, without the 】need to fly of course【.A【 cam\per【 vanThe famous Inter/rail Pas】s gives y】ou th】e liberty to tra\vel to 31 differ/ent European countrie/s/, all of which a/re\ home to na\tural beaut/y. What to do onc/e y\ou arrive at the station【? Tra【velling from the s】tation to yo【ur countryside \de/stination could be arrange】d 【usin【g the car 】s【haring App BlaBla Car whic\h has been tried and tested. You 【might make some frien\ds and you won't h\ave the probl】em o\f park/ing the car. Any\ 】of t】hese/ options/ wi】ll hel/p to calm any eco-anx】iety that /you may be feeling. W】hat to【 d\oReconnect with natureA study has proven that any form of immersion in the natural world heighte】ns you\r overal/l we\ll-being and s/timulates you to have a more po/s【i】tive inter\ac】tion】/ with the /w【ider human com】/mun/i】ty. In【 light of th【i】s, many are p】ra\isin】g/ th\e Japanes/e p【ractice of \Fore】st Bathin】g. No,/ \this does not me/an taking a bath in 【between the trees. T/his ancient/ proces【s of relaxation involves】 qu】ietly】/ o\bserving nature, pl】acing yo\urself 【in proximity【 with the\ tr\ee\s/ and breathing deeply. I/f y/ou’re\ looking fo/r a range\ of forests in the UK c】ountryside, F【ore/stry E【ngland provides a searc【h engin\e so y】ou can fi\n/d t【he woods clo【s\e to\ you.A woodlandReconnecting wit【h natur】e can also be done th【rough/ a\ctivit/ies \like ou/tdoor yoga/, walking, wild sw/imming, cycling, wild 【swimming, I could go on.W\hat t\o takeRent a fa】ncy bell te】ntNot staying in】 a cotta】g/e 【or eco-lodg/e? Put/ti【ng u\】p a ca】nvas te【nt (】mayb/e next\ to your r】etr/o camper van) c】ould be /ae/sthetically mindblowing and highly practical/. F】at Lama is a platfo】【rm th/at allows \you\ to rent o】ther p\e/\ople’s cool t\ents that otherwise m\i【ght be 】a larg【e fina】【nci\al investment. \A bell tentBe pr/epared for】 th【e outdoor pi【cnic/sTake your own ba/mboo plates\ and cutlery for those /picnics underneath the shade of a willow tree next 】to a trickling stre\am. That/’s a/ ni\ce Romantic \nove【l【 image isn’t it? But /a bin filled with throwaway plastic forks and plates is not so\ much//. View this post o/n InstagramFrom /o/ur friends in N】o/rway/ @beeco】shop.no【 - Our new Grubware Eat/Drink Tool Kit in Norw\egi\an NYHET! Zero-waste best/ikksettet for den ak【tive ?? Dekker b//ehovene når du vil spise take-away【 i hverdagen, på fest/festival eller drikke juic/e eller smoothie. De【\tte kittet inneho】lde【r 【Spo【rk, gaffe【l/, skje, /kni】v, spi【se【pinn】er,/ sugerør og rengjørings/børste til】 sugerør. Lag/et //【av &os】lash;ko【logisk bambus og op/pbevart i】 en tøypose av &oslas【h;kologisk b】omull ? Mindre \avfal【l i hver【】】dagen】.【 Ja takk ?A post【 /shared b【【y bam【【bu® (\@b/ambuliving) on M【ay 15, 2019 at 2:34pm【 PDTTak\e food aw/ay wi】th youTaking 【food a\【way is a great way to /【prepare for your p/otentially isolated trip to/ the countrysid\e. So why no\t wr】ap /your food 【in\ c【ling film? Well, a\ccord】ing \to BeeBee 【‘more \than 1.2 bil】lion metres, equating \to 745,000 mi【les\ of【 cling fi【lm is used by ho】useho】lds a】cross Britain ev】ery year\&【rsquo;. Be】eswax wrap/s are a【 muc】h more su\stainable alt】\ernative to prolonging the life o【//f 【your foo】d. V/iew this post on Instagr/am\Happ\y /】Spring Equi【nox! ?? Al fresco eat【ing is 【wi】thin reac】h again! Hurray! . . . . . /#InternationalHappinessDay! #springequinox #spri】ng #beeswaxwraps #b\eebeewraps 【#food #alfresco/ #picnic \#outside 【#eating #alfre\scodining #flowers #tulips #plasticfree #zerowa】ste\ #foods【torage #packaging #clingfilmal\ternati】ve #ta\bl【e/ #b【ees #beeswax #organic #c】otton #organiccottonA post sh】ared【 by】 Bee【\Be【e Wraps/ (@beebe】】e】/wraps) 【o/n】 Mar 20\, 2019 at\ 10:30a\m P/DTShare this 】【article 】 More from pla\cesLqNd

3.ncwMClimate cha【nge【】/ h】a/s played /heavily in 2/019, with activists/ around the/ wor/ld h】olding protests and cal\li\ng on go【vernments t【o make a c【hange. Experts s\ay that the climate emerge】ncy is the most urge】【nt【 /is】sue of o/\u\r time.One organisation, the 【Bari【lla Centre for Food and Nutrition,】 has\ d【【ecided to try】】 and tackle the /proble】m head-on.They say it&rsquo/;s import/ant for t【hem to take a step towards mak/ing an effective c/hange as gre】enhous/e gas emissions creat【ed by】 \food production, distribution and c/onsumption were// &ld【quo;identif\ied 【a/s playing a key role” in the climate\ crisis.This /year 】mar\ks the 10th year that the/ fou【ndation has 】organised /the Inte\rnational \Forum\ on F\oo】d and Nutrition in Milan.The organ】is【ati】on s/ay】【s the forum focusses /on p\romoting drastic change in the mindset of al\l stakeh\olders, whether/ governments, civil society or/ganis】ations, private se】ctor, or research and s/】cience.With 】a thi\rd of CO2 emi\ssions caus】【ed by foo/d p\roduction, the B\arill【a foundation's 'Su-Eatabl】e Li【/fe' p】\roject aims to 【change diets on a large scale.O/ne of the 】expert】s who was at the forum, Ri/cc【ard//o Val】entini, believes/ in o】rder to【 pr【oduce food mor\e sustainably people nee/d to:“【reduce【 their footprint in /terms of/ greenhouse gas emissions, and so to move their diets from unsustainable t/o /more climate-】friendly diets.&rdquo/;Also o】n the agenda was th【【\e Digitising Agrifo【od r/eport, w\hic\h looks at】 new and 】inno/vativ\e ways to prod】uce【 【foo/d in a mo【re environmentall】y friendly way. It involves exploring the potential【 o】f d/igital technol\o\gies to make food produ】ction more sus/tain\able.We spoke 】】to one of the au【tho【rs of the repor】t And【rea Re】nda who explaine】d h【】ow te【】chnology could be u】sed to help tackle the \problem:"【【Puttin\g s\ensors in th/e/ s/o【il and asking t\hose s/ensors to really colle/ct \the i【nforma【tion on whe】n an】d how the】 s/oil should /be \treat/ed, whether the tempera】ture/, whether t\h】e moisture i\s cor【rect, and so【 on/【e can be m\uc【h mo/re surgical in treating\ the soil.”Watch our Spotlight repor/t by O\la】f Bruns for more about what the foundation 】is doing to tackle t】he problem of cli】mate 】change.Share this articleCopy/pas【te the 】article video \em】bed link below:【CopyShar】eT【weetSharesendS】hareTwee】tSharesendM\oreHideSh】areSendShareShare\S\hareSendShar【eShareMore about//SummitFoodEnvironmen\tal protectionMilano 【 【Browse /to【d】a【y's tagsX8xS

4.XVRXBio/economy matter/\sIn this episod【/e, F【u/t/uris vis】its a /bioproduct mill i】n 】Finland where scientists, manage】rs, and inv\estors trying to p/roduce sustainable produ/cts using les/s \water and 】less energy.In the last】 f】e【w 【years, the European Un\ion has invested almos\t 4 billion eu】ros in re】search /a\imed at developing】 the】 economy in su/stai【nabl】e wa/ys.The B\ioecono【my sector a/lready employs 18 mil/lion p/e/ople with an\ annual turnover of around 2 trillion euros.Tha\t's】 /a hug/e/【/ economic pot/en】tial for\ agricul\ture, forestry, fisheries, food\, and bio-energy, that rely on a myriad of bio-base\d p【roducts cu/rren/tl\y being de/v\elop】【ed and hitting the markets around the whole continent.The \pot/ential of //pulpThe &A\uml;änek/osk】i bioprodu\c/t mil】l i】n Finland】 believes that【 it is /possible to【 transform】 up to 6.5 million cubi\c meters of pulpwood\, eve【ry yea\r, without using【 a sing/le drop\ 【of /fossil fuels.240 trucks and 70 full/y【 loaded train-w【ago\ns】 feed the mill every day with birch, spru\ce, and pine./Th\/e wo\od i【s 【used to prod【uce 【pulp, which has an annual\ p/】r】\oduct/ion\ of around 1.3 million tons.And yet, no fossil 【f】uels are \used /in t\he /whol】e pro\ces【s. 】Its managers say the mil/l i\s /completely self-suffi】cient."We are producing two and a half t/\imes more energy】 than we /are using ou\/r】s/el\ves," says Camilla Wikstr/【öm//, the 】senior/ \vi【ce-president\ /o【f Metsä\ Fibre."We /have sludge, an\d from\ the sludge【\, we/ ar\e making biogas. And then 】we have the bark, f\/\rom which we/ a【re m】aking\ product-gas and also the bark is sold out for en/ergy use outside\ the mill."【\The whole system is based on 】the idea of trying to prod】uce sus【tain【able products using less wa】ter and 】/less en/ergy. And co/ming up with ideas of ho】w】】 to use pulpwo/od i】n products other than the \usual paper an\d cardboard:"We have the ongoing pr【oject of making te】xtil/es fr【om the pulp. And also /the p\oss\ibility to 】make composites to replace 】plastics," adds Ca/milla Wi/kström.In la【boratories at the m\il\l, th【e inner prope\rties of raw materials are closely monit【\ore】d. Researchers ar【e driving t/】he development\ of sustainable thr\ee-lay/er cardboards aim\ed at i/n】/novative packagi/\ng."We are/ d】eveloping our /hig】h】\-yie【ld p】ulp】s and we/ are optimizing th】e three-layer st\r【u】ctu\re and\ then we need to know t【he information of the surface layers and then the b/ulky midd/le layer," sa/ys Terhi Saar【i, C/hemist \& director of the techno【logy 【c】enter, Metsä Bo\ard. "And (the aim is) to \make enough stre\ngth and stiffne/ss for our products".The mill required an initial inve/stment\ of 1.2 bill】ion 【euros and 【managers hope tha\t innov/at/ive green products made o\ut】 of wood will 】hel】p【 pa/y o【ff that huge inves\tment."Most/ o【f the new p【roducts/ \developed over 】the last 50 years or so w【er\e based o【n oil, they are \petroch\emical product【s," says Iklas von/】/ Weymarn, CEO of M\etsä Spri/ng."But now the situation /in terms of the business envir/o/nment, including climate】/ chan/ge an/d so o\n, is chang/ing, and【 it opens up new possibiliti】es to produce these prod【ucts fr\om wood."\Bi【【odegradable bagsAnot/】her key step in reducing 】our dependency on fos\sil fuels is/ our/ capacity t/o produce mor【e and better biodegradabl/【e,【 co【mpostabl【e biopla\stics.Resear/chers 【in Novamont \in\ northern Italy are currently developing 】and te\sting】 experimental\/ technologies to create biop】la/st】ic【s 【\fr\om ingred【ients 】suc【h as corn starch【, cellulose and vegetable oi\ls as raw materials.The /manufacturing ch\a\in \is comple\x and includes \mechanical processes 【like extrusion 【and b】lowi【ng, wh】ich trans\forms th/e natural materials\ into biopla】stic 】fi//lms,【 that can late【r be used/ to produce】 /\b】iogradable shop【【ping bag【s a/nd other biod】egrada【ble and com【postable products su【ch a\s 【plat【es, gla【sses and cutlery:The process of composti【n\/g\ or biodegrading】 these plastics into something more element】al, 】like organic carbon,\ or simply 】compo】st, takes \a long ti\me and the right c/ondi\tions.\Ale【s\【sandro【 D】&a】cute;elic【io【, an industrial chem【ist a【t No【【vamont sa/ys i/t's an u】ndergro】und process: "molecules of these 【b/ioplastics become, little by little, simpler, thanks to the a/ct\ion of microorgan\isms."T【he need for mech/anical tests is】】【 als/o importa】nt as bio】plast\ic 】must off/e/r 】th【e same str//ength \a】nd re【si】lience as ord\inary pet/ro/ch【emical plastics./ But ther\e is e\ven m】\ore to it:"Bey】ond /these m【echanical t/ests, w\e can al\/so ma】ke here qualitat/ive tests," says A】le【ssandro D´e【licio.【"We】 can/, for i\nst【ance\, measure the friction rate, or all p【roper\tie\s linked t/o the permeab【ility of the biomateria/ls,【 or /i【ts optical /properties"】These/ tests are part of】 a \Europe/a【n research projec【t ai/med at rethink【ing】 the whole plastic v】alue chai\/n, in an effort to create new business model/s and to better pr/otect the en】vironment./Researc】hers meet regu/larly to\ brainstorm new /innovation/s and 【eco-de/signs using bioplastics."We don´t simply want to c\hange one】 product for ano/ther," s/ays Luigi Ca\pizz\i, head】 】of research & developmen【t at Nov/amont."This is【 not our aim. We【 want to/ develop a syst\em that can mak【e /better use of the reso【urces of the planet; cons/uming【 less of thes/e re/sources, and redistributin/】【g them in a fairer, more】 efficien【t way."Educating the consumerEurop【e pr/oduces\ ar\ound 25 m】i【llion t//ons/ of pl】astic\ waste eve【ry year. On】ly a third is re】cycled, 【the rest/ is either in】carcerated or ends up in landfills,【 s\o u/rgent so//lutions are /\】\indeed nee】ded.Action on plastics was identifie/d by the European Commission in January 2018 as a priority /in the C【ircular Economy Action Plan, to help/ Europe】an/ businesses /and consumer\s to 【use r\【esou\rces i【【n a more sust/aina【ble way\.Sap/onia/, a/ leading de\terg\ent and personal hygiene pro【ducts ma\nu/fact】ure/r in Croatia is already【 us】【ing /b/iopla【stics\】 on the interior of their deterg\en/t pa\ckaging/."We \star/ted usi【ng a certai【n ty\pe of 【bioplas【\tic produ/ct【 /】/and then simply teac】\/h our consumers tha】t/ its\ better for them an\d for the en\viro【nment," says Andrea Bozi】】\c, h\ead of education】 and information center at【 Saponi/a."So ov【e\r【 time//, we noticed【 】that they a\ccepted these types of plas\tics and product pa【ck/ag】ing, so we will simply broad\en it \to our ot【her pro\du/cts."Resea/rchers hope their work will add /to a European 】tar\get of s】ome 10/ mill/ion to\ns of recyc/【led plastic】s being\ t【【】ransformed i\nto n/ew products by 2025.A【lo/ng with research and innovation, sc\ientists/ sa\y, education will play a c】ru/】cial ro/le in me\eting tha/t objective."There are cou】n】tries\】 in Northern Europe whose plastic waste management system i\s ve\ry well im】plemented an【d deve】loped】," says Montserrat Lan/ero, an indus【trial engineer an【//d CIR】/C-PA】CK project manager."Bu\t in other countri【es, th/is management of p】lastic wa【st【e does not ev【en exis【t. A/nd【 many】 cit/izen/s don't know what the implications of this bad manageme】nt are when it 【comes】 to \】how plastics end up in t/\【he o\ceans or ent】\er o】ur f\ood chain【.""So one of ou】r main challenges i【s to understand what are th】e needs\ of each Euro\pean cou\ntr/y to be a\ble to find /as】 many ada】pte\d solutions as we \can".To und】erstand thos【e needs, researc【hers hav】e turned t】o the concept o【f "citizen scien/【ce", /inv【olving consumers associations, to understand what the social and market expe【ctations are when i/t /comes to \reinforcing th】e ci】r】cular economy in the plas】tic sector."We need to e】m/power the citizen. Beca】use often t/hey /don'】t realize t\h】at their shopping【\ decis/i/o】\n is very important /in 】movin/g the market toward】s more \sustainabl】e trend【s," says Bel&eac\/ute;n Ramos, project officer for the envi】ro/\nment【 a】/t the Spani\sh Organi\sation of Consumers and Users Consu【mers - O【CU."B/ut we\ also need to em【po/wer th】e market so it can give\ a】 wider array of c\hoices to the consumer."On【e European research pr】ojec/t studyi【ng /t【h】e possibilities/ of\ crea/ting new b【ioproducts /which we\re previou【sly mad/\e with \chemic/als or oil-based /prod/ucts is the Exil】va biorefinery in N【orway./Scientists there ar【e【 tr】ying to transfor【m trees into products for at s【ectors as diverse as the automotive industry, the adh\esive ind\us【try,/ and even cosmetics.Every year 1 millio】n cubic】 meters of Norw【egia\n spruce \are trans】formed into cel/lulose, l【ignin, bioeth【anols and ce【llulo/se【 fibers.T\hese cellulose fibers/ can be turned/ into 【bioproducts through a proc【ess known a/s 【"fibrillat/ion"."The properties that som\e of the custom】/ers are looking f】or are th\e controlled vis/cosity it off/ers, so for instance /whe【n you are paintin【\g, yo】u avoid drippi/ng 【or sagging of the\ pain\t when you are applying it to t/he wal】l," says Jarle Wikeby, a ch/emical e\ngineer at【 Ex/il\va."Or you can c【ontrol the har/de】\ning 【process within adhesives. And y\ou can also have a g【ood effe】ct by adding the/ product i【nt/o c\osmetics, or \antiwrinkle/ creams】 for instanc/e."Laborato\ry research \helps improve th【e properties of th】e product and en\hance its array of industrial applications.Sc/ientists at Borregaar\d /biorefinery wo\rk to develop hi】gh efficiency and/ robust 】products for harsh environments."We are looking at particle size or specific aggregate sizes,\" 】say【s\ K\ristin 【Weel Su\ndby\, a chemist 】at Borregaard."As yo/】u \might kno\w, we also have\ two different qual/ities, one is more fibri/llated that the other. \And we 】are also starting to】 look at more film properties. With the product, you can ma【ke films/ tha/t have very goo/d\ barrier propertie【/s, oxygen barrier\s, that give strength to the /products."The pro【duct i\s one o\f】 the 700 bas】】ed on n/atural ra/w materials】 /being develope【d the\re, which【 managers 】s/ay is a trend that should grow/ in the c\omi【ng\ years:"Our product is typic\/ally a little help【er. /So you\ on】ly need a \litt\le【 new formulation to change completely a product f\rom oil-based to water-based," says Pal Rombe】rg,/ vice-pre【sident】 of B】orregaard."So 【i/t is not really a cost issue here. 】Consumer a\wareness a\nd general public aw】areness crea\te a drive】 fo\r more sustainability and /greener product\s. And this r\e】ally motiv/ates companies 】out there【 to go d【own【 tha\】t 】road a【nd really/ sp【end on resources fo【r devel】oping new,【 better products".Th】ese better products,【 rese【archers sa】y,/ should keep【 s\tea】dil\y coming to\ the ma】rkets, as t】he \European Uni/on is planning to invest a】nother 10 billion eu】r【os in\ Bioeconomy research by 】2027.12 】 【 FUTURIS \LONG 1\ / 】】 \ 12 / \ \ 】 / / FU/【【TURIS LONG 1 / 】 \ 【 12 】 / \ /FUTURIS LONG 1 】 【 【 【 \】 \ 12 】 /】 【 / FUTURIS \L\ONG \ 【 【 12 【 / FUTURIS LON【G 1\ \ / 】 / / 【 \ 】 Share th/is ar】ticleCopy/pas\te the article video embed link\ bel\ow:CopyShar/eT/weetShare\se\ndShareTwee】tSharesendMoreH【ideShareS/endShareShareShareSendShar/eS\hareY】ou might also li】ke 【 / 】 Sar\dinian thistles play /key 】rol/e in bioplastics 】 【 【 / / Could bio-plastic 】\/be the answer to bot【tl\】e wo\es? 】 \ 【 【 More a【boutSust\ainable devel/opment【RecyclingEnvironm】ental】 protection 】 M/\ost viewed / / 【\ \ \ W【ha】】t influence on climate is the cor【onavirus lockdown really having? 【 /\ The ne\w AI【 system sa\feguar\ding\ prem\ature b\abies f/rom infecti】on / \ / \ Messenger RNA: th\e mol/ecule /th\at may tea\ch o\ur bod\ie【s to beat cancer/ \ 【 /\ / \ / 】 \Apple and Goo【gle sa/y t\he\y&\#039;ll w】ork together\ to tr\ace spread o\f coronavirus via smartphones 】 \ 】 【 How EU funding is changing】【 the face of Latvian innovation 】 【 \ // Brows【e today's tagsWs1U

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2OSoA/ "monster fatberg," consisting of eve\rythi\ng that shou】ldn't\ 【have /been flu【shed 】down a】】 toilet or poured d【\own a \si\nk, has【 been d【isc】overed/ in Devon, E\n\gland.South We/st /Water (SWW) says the berg【, which\ i/s belie/】ved to the larg\est e【ver found in\ Devon, is\ 64 m【etres in length.To pu【t this into perspective, 【it /is 7 metres lon/ger than the height 【of Italy's Leaning Tower /of P】】isa,【 1【2 】metres longer than the he】ight of/ Nelson【's\ Colum【n in London, 【and 1】7\ metres【 lo】nger t/ha】n the \hei\ght of P/aris【'【 //Arc de Triomphe.It is 【f\ormed of ma\/ny\ wa【\ste 】products, including】 wet wipes, co【ngea/led fat, oil and grease inside the sewer.An【d the/ 【remov】al process isn't expected to be s/imple."This is g/oing t\o t/ake us several weeks to remove," SWW's Director of Wastewater Andrew Roantree said/ 】in a vi】deo \stat【/em/ent \on Twitter."I】t will b/e a difficult/ exercise for our guys, and we ne/ed to】 \do/ it to protect【 the bath【ing wat【er [on the c】oast]."Work to remove the /fatber\g is due to begin on F/ebr/uary 4, /where sew】er 】w【orker\s 】will【 use hig/h-pressure j\et【s, shovels, pi】ckax\es and speci/alist equipment to tac】kle】 the m\onster b【it by bit.The】】se sewer blockag【es costs customers &p】o/und;4】.5 mi【llion a yea【r," South Wes\t Wat/【er w/arne\d."Every ti/me a wet wipe is/ flushed or oil p/oured 【down the】 drain, \there i\s a risk these it【ems【 could \c\ause sewer blockages. This i/s【 extremely unpleasant and could happen in your own home."London '/b\erg'\However, Devon's discovery \is still no 】m【atch for the enormous 250 metre【-lon【g fatberg found in London's sewe】r system i】n 2017.Small p【ar/ts of this chunk o/f waste were later exhibited at the Mu/seum of London,/ while the rest was rec/ycl\ed as bio【fuel to power Lond】on's bus network.REA】D MORE:【/ "BI【N it, don't 【BLOCK】 it!" -】 Monster 'fatber/g' is foun/d in London\ sewerREAD MORE: London】's 'fatberg' moves fro\m sewer/ /to museumShare th】is art\icleCopy/past\e the ar【t\icle video embed link below:CopyShareTweetShare】sendShareTweetShar\esend【MoreHideShareSendSh\areShareShare【SendShareShareYou might al【so like 】 】 】】 \ A circular economy is within \reach if Eu\rop】/ean busines/ses grasp the opportunity ǀ V\iew / \ \ 】 】 】 \ 【 Th】e Ugandan/ singer /tu【rning plastic waste int】o d【rums \ 】 \】 【 Our d\【isposable culture must 【end. We need t/he ‘right to repair’【 not/ recycle our s【martphones】 ǀ】】 Vi\ew More a\boutwastewast\e disposalEnvir/onm/entEnvironmental protection 【 】 Brow/se today&\#0【39\;s tagseGrs

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J9pvThe ef\fort to end pla\stic pol/lu】tion in our oceans was /one of the【 /【key th】【emes of 2018, \wi【th Europea\n【 Un【io\n lawma【kers \ending the ye【ar with an \agr【eement to ban【 certai】n single-use 【plas】tics by 2021.Mic【r】opla/stics c】an 】affe】ct microscopic animals' ability to feed and the【】】ir ability to repro/\】duc【e Dr Matt /Cole 【/ Marine Plas【tics/ Re】search Scientist,】 Plymouth M\arin/e Laborato/r【y /Be/l】gian 】MEP Fr&eacu/te;d&eacut】e;\rique【 【Ries 【is behind the law, and t】【old Euron【ews: "Th/e balloon \sticks, the stirrers, the cotton buds, the straws, the 】plates are going to be b【anned】. And 】why \are \they going to be banned?【 Beca【u】【se t【he【y \a【re the /a\rticles that you mostly f\/ind on our beaches, /and/ on/\ our oceans, and becaus【e 【there are alternatives."A【 central issue in the single-use plastic ban is who is going to pay. The new European di/rective means fishin/g ge\ar \manufacturers will/ be】ar the cost\s of collecting ne/ts lost at】 sea, rather than the f/is/hermen.】The 】s【ame k【ind of principle is【 \being 】applied to the tobacc/o \industry and its \plast\【ic\ cigarette ends.However industry body Pla】sti\csEurop【e argues the responsibility/ should be sh】ared more widely.Executi/v\e Direc】\tor Karl Foerster explained\ th【eir posit】ion to Eur【one/w/s【: "We make the raw material, so that's our responsibili/ty, t/hen you have somebody t【hat makes /the product, then you have the c【onsum【er b/rands/ that p\】ackage any food in it, t【he people consume 【it and b\uy it \in a re/tailer, so you see t【he\re a\re many 】play【ers that are invo/lved i/n the life-cycl】e of a product\."An estimated 8 million tonnes of 【p】/last\ic waste end【s up in \th】e\】】 oce/ans every year. 】The EU's ban is【【 significant in terms o\f s】/etti\ng a policy precedent, /but it won't \change\ the seas ver【y 】much, as/ 90% of the p\la】s/tic pollution is【 believed to com/e from 10 rive【rs - 8 in As/ia, /and \two in Africa."The plastics become micro\plastics in \the oceans and ar\e eaten by marine animals. 【Dr Ma】tt Cole, a Marine Pla】stics R/es\earch Scie\nti\st at P\lym】outh\/ M\ar\ine Labo\ratory, tol【d \Euronews that all【 creatures gr【eat and small are affected. "What we've been able to identify (is) t\hat in very small plankt/onic microsco/pic animals, that the microplastics can/ effect their ability t\o feed,/ their a【bil/ity to\ re/produc【e and also their sur/vival," he 【says. "Other \researchers have d/one th\e same/ kind of work on oys】ters, mus\cles and fish, and also 】shown vario/us negati/ve impacts that th】ese plastics ca/n have on】 these animals."Along【【side】 the sin【gl/e【-use plast/ic【s// ban there are other\ e【fforts being made to sol【ve the p/roblem.This ye【ar/ The Ocea/n 】Cleanu/p deployed thei\r first system aime\d at catching large\r plastic【 w\a】ste in the Pacific for recycl/ing.Jou\rnalist name • Jeremy WilksShare this articleCopy/【paste the article \video embed link below:Cop【yShar/eT】weetSharesendShareTweetSharese\ndMore/H】i\deS】hareSendSh/areShareSh】areSendS】hareShar【\】eYou might also】 like 【 /】 \ 】 \ 【 I【ta【lian ban【 o/n plastic cotton 】buds 【comes into ef/fect 【 】 \ 】 】 / \ 【 【 Scotland bans si\ngl【e-us\e coffee cups in gov【ern【ment buildings【 】 / 】 \ Greenpeace: Single-use pl/astic\ h【as to stop 【 \ More aboutEco/l\ogyEnvironmental protectionPollutionEuropean politicsplastic【 Browse today's ta【gsvYSP

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mfFzDeep sea explorer Jean-Michel Cousteau 【teaches UAE childr\en abou\/t \ocean c/o】nse\rva/tion7oAV

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yjgaGood c/hemis/【try: helping busine】/ss to come w】ithin REACH rulesIwHX

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Q7Ri\This week, in a quiet street\ in【 the Norwegian har【bour town o【f Bergen, officials from E】U member states \【an】d No【rway/\/ will hole up in the\ Fisk【【er/idirektorate】t, or Fisheries D\irectorate, to decide the size of the fish 【pie to【 get divided \out between them from so-called &【ld】quo;shared \stocks.” This &ldqu【o;consulta】tion,” as /it is known, happ\ens a【way from pub】l/ic scr/utiny. Yet】, fishing indu/st】ry l【obby【ists are a【llowe/【d i/n where they get to 【cosy up t】o d\elegat【es, while civil so】ciety re/presentatives are 】- qu\ite l】itera【lly - /left out in the cold. These】 annual gat/herings are even more secretive th/an the【 EU AGRIFISH \council meetings, which were re【cently【 investigated by th【e E/U 【Ombudsman 【and found to/\ be】 /】lackin【g in transparency.EU-Norway【 consultations c/o/nsiste】ntly res\】ult in agree////me\nts to /continue overf【/i】shing. T】his is in no s\\mall part d\ue to a be\wilde\ringly flawe【d a【pproach】: by assuming the scienti【fi】c advice fo【r maximum】 sustai【【nable c【at【【che【s a\s a /s\tart\ing point and then negotiating upwa】】rds. /The 】EU \commit\ted to phase out overfishin/g【【 u\nd】e【r the r/ef】orme】d/ Common【 Fish】eries P/olicy (CFP【) by 2\【015 or, at the absolute\ 【l/atest, by 20. Ye】t【 while the act of catch】】ing\ too many fis】h occurs at\ sea, it is insi\de meetings like/ t/h】is /【where overfishing is \shamelessly agreed up/on and a】pproved\.On 16 Decembe\r in Brussels, EU fisher】ies ministers【 will follow】 up on 】the Norway \“consultations” at the an】nual AGRIFISH Co\uncil meeting, 】where quotas/ f\【or 】/the 【Nort】h East Atlantic w/\ill be fought over into the wee hours \of the night】/. Acc/ording to all the signs, \this year they will again agree\ to overfish several key stocks.The 【recen/t gro/und-breaki/ng IP】/BES Global Asses】sment Report on Bi】od/iversity and Ecosystem Services e【stimated 【humanity is threa【ten【ing a million species with extin【cti【on. Over/fis【hin】g rem/ains the bigges/t imp【act on our【 o/cean. Rebecca【 Hub】bard 】 【 】 \Programm\e Di【\rector at Our Fish The sig/nals? F\】i/sheries ministers /【/have s【\et fishing quo/tas abo【ve\ scie/ntif【i【【c a/dvice in six ou\t of every 10 c【as】es since the CFP was reformed i\n 2013. Th\e AGRIFI/SH Council v【ery rarel【y 【sets fishing quotas at more sustainable leve】ls than the EU Commission proposes. The 【EU】 Commission’s pro\posal for a number of\ North Eas】t Atlantic fish populations for 202【0 are a】lread\y above the scientific a/】dvi\ce, and the c【ontinu】ed politi\cal/ delay \】from\ fisheri】es m】inist/【ers has wors】ened the situ\ation, me【an【ing ministe【rs/ \are now fa】ced 】wi/【th【 proposal/s for dr】ast【ic cuts to some fish such as\ the iconic North S【ea cod.Not on//ly are mini】sters presid】ing over fishing/ limi/ts for/ a declining number of 【fishers\, they are overseeing 【the/ on\going decline of our marin【e resou【rces /instead of making sustainable 【resource mana/gement dec\i\sions 【that would improve the health of th【e ocean and/ secure the futur\e of f【isherpeople an/d 】coastal 】communities.T【\he recent gr\ound-brea\k/ing IPBES Globa\l Assessment Report on Bio】diversity an【d Eco【s【ystem \Services 【【estimated humanity\ is thre】atening a /mi\llio/n species with extinction.\ It also conc】lu\ded that the b】iggest threats \to na】ture are f【rom change】s to l】and\/sea use and over-exploitation. Overf/\ishing\ remains the 【bi【ggest \impact【 on our ocean.But re【m】】oving \the impact/ of overfishing\/ can restore oce/an health /and inc【r】ease/ \its capacit/y t/o m/itigat\e, an\d a【d【a【p\t to, the impacts of climate/ change【. It is therefore a key form/ of c【limate action. This has starte\d to permeat【e in】to p】olicy\. On 19 November【, the EU Council\, i\】n response t【o t/he 】recent/ IPCC Special/【 Report on\ the O\c/ean 】and Cryosphere, appe\ale/d to the EU Commission for policy options in t/he new Gr\een Deal, wh\ile st【a】t】ing the need for 【urgent action 【to \addres】s】 the incr\easin】g threat of climat/e b/r】eakdown to【 the o】\cean an【d marine l】i】fe.So, missing【 the deadline of 20/2/0 puts the EU in di/fficult territory\. It【 places EU fisheries 】ministers in direct】 cont\ravention of/ th/e 【laws that they【, or the【】ir pr/edecesso【rs, 【created a/nd signed up to, and in poten/tial conflict with the】 climate a】ction taken by othe【r ministries within their\ own gove\rnments.When EU fisheries】 】】ministers set annual\ f】\ishing l/imits 【for 2020 on 16 and 17 Decemb/e【r, they must/ deliver on internati/onal/ an/d EU obligations t【o 【end /overfishing. 】 Rebecca Hubbard / Programme Dire\ctor at O\ur Fish 】 / Norway, to】o, h\as inv\ested】\ a great【 deal in/ pro【jectin【g itself \as\ a climate and anti-overf【is【hing cha\【mp/ion,/ when in actu/al f】【act, it/ too, is hypocrit\ical 【on both is\sues】【. On climate, Nor/wa\y 】has made big commitments】 】to become a ‘l\ow-carbon 【so【c【iety&rsq】u/o; but in reali/ty, emi】ssions are decreasing much slower. On】 ov】erfishing, Norway signed up\ to the 【Sustai【nable Development Goals】 【to en/d overfis/hing by 2020, bu】t on【 the water, they received a quota in 2019 large enough to plunder a massive 164,000 tonnes of fish above s\cientifical】/ly advised sust\ainable level\s (equivalent to 21% of its share/d s/toc\k quota with the E【U).W/hile N】orway\ and the EU discus【s h\ow best】 to continu\e ove\rfishing in Bergen】, further south, delegates at the COP25 climate meeting in Madrid focus【 on the ocean, 【in what has been labelled the “Blue COP.&rdq/u/o; With states under pressure to ste/p up their commitments to action on climate, discus\sions will be focusing】 on why there is not more ac/t【ion on oceans【 when【 we know what needs to be done. And it ca】n be done relatively quickly/, a\s 】the longer-【term (but cr】【itical) ac】tion\ of slashing car\bon emis】sions gets underway?Late】r th【i【s month, EU prime min【i\sters】 have an op】portu】nity to g\o public with a】 cle/a/r and \deliverable climate emergency acti/on. W】hen E/U fisher【ies min【isters】 set annual fis\hing limits for 2020 \o】n 16 and 17 December, they must de】liver on int】e【rnat【ional and EU o】bligations to/ end overfishing.Rebecca\ Hubbard i\】s t/he Progra\mme Direct\or/ at Our Fis【h.____________Are you【 a recognised expert\ in you/r field】? At E【uronews,/ we belie】ve all views matt\er. Co\n】t\act us at view@euronews.com to send pitches or submis/sions and be【 p/ar/t of the con】/versation.Share this articleShareTweetSh\aresendShareTw/\eetSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareShar【eSha】reSe\【ndShareShareYou might also/ like //】 \ / The EU’s G【reen】 Deal p/\lan/s to /restore nat\ure mu/st include our largest e/cosystem - th】e ocean ǀ /Vie【】w 【 / \ 【 \ / 】 】 Scien】t\ists have\ emb\arked from Norway【/ on the lo/ngest-ever exped\itio/n to the 】Arctic / / \ 【 \ \ \ How s/mall sca\le fi\sheries saved Da【nish f】ishi/ng communities Mor】e aboutf【/ishingNorwa/yEuropean U/nionFisheryEnvironmental protectionCOP /5 M】a\drid Browse today's tagsdAM8

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tvyKIc【eland's lar】gest national p\ark is h】oping to【 /gain UNESCO World\ Herit\age sta】tus at UN committe】e talks in】 Azerbaijan/.Vatnajökull Nati【onal Pa】rk is home to vast glaciers, utterly uni\nh【abit【ed land and ten ac\】tive v\olcanos. Despite the presence of o\p】posing elements/, the great land】scape h\as remained st【ab【l/e【 for/ more than 1,000 years. The meltin【g ice from the /glaciers f【uels some of Iceland'】s most powerful rivers. T】he seasonal ebb 】and flo\w of the ice 】i】s 【crit】ical in mainta/】】ining the/ sta】】bilit\y of the ecosystem of】 /Vatnaj&o】um】】l/;kull\, wh】ich covers 14% of Iceland.Now, however, r/ising temperatures are causing the gl【aciers to melt at unprec/e/d【ented rates. Every/ y\ear, more ice disappears,/ r/evea【ling 】new la\nd underneath the glaciers. In the/ last \century】 alone】, Vatnajök\ull has lost 10% of its volume.The a/re【a is so unlike /anyth】ing else /o\n earth that it has been used as a case study by as/tronauts. In the months pr\eceding the Apollo 11 mission in the late six\ties, Neil Armstrong and his c/olleagues visited the 】park to \study its l】un【ar】-like/ terrain. Som/e a】reas\ of Vatnajökull Nati\onal Park are utterly uninhabited by /lif】e, \be it animal o/r plan\t, render\ing it an ideal】 place to \stud\y moon-like geology.Water, fire /and ice, the elemen/ts that】 make up 【the uniqu\e park【 ar【e represen】ted on t/he nati\onal f\lag of /Ice\la】n【d, blue fo/r water, red for fire, and white】/ for ice. If granted /Wor\ld Heritage Sta【tu】s, Va\tnajöku】ll National Park】 \wil【l b【e the third】 Icelandic site to】 a\chieve the status.Want more【 news?】Video editor • Fr\ancois RazyShare this a【\/rtic】leCopy/pa\ste the 【ar【ticle video emb】ed /link【 bel【ow:CopyShareTweet【S//ha\resen\dShareTweet\SharesendMoreHid【eShar【eSendShareShareShareSe】ndShareShareYou m【ig/ht also l/ike 】 】 / \ 【 / 【 \ \Climate Change top of t\he agen\da as No【rdic mi【niste/rs m/ee】t /Germ/any's Merkel in Iceland 】 【 【 / 【 【【 \ 【\ \Tens of t】housands of Estonian】s perfo/rm mass folk singin【g 】 / \ 】【 Well-being agenda: d/oes this spell/ the e\nd for GDP? \ 】 More abou\t20-seconds【Icel\andEnvironmental protec/tionUNESCO Cultur】a/l 】Heritage ListEnviro/nment / 【 Browse today�【39;s ta】gsuTZ3

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