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电玩电玩城2020年05月27日08时14分57秒

时间:2020-05-27 08:14:59 作者:唱吧 浏览量:44924

复制网址领彩金【ag88.shop】IDBo FSk0J9QOTe】xt sizeAaAaIn th\e shadow of \t【he f】irst/ a】nnive】rsary of/ jo【urnalist Jamal Khashoggi’s 】murder an\d\ amid escalating tensions in neighbouring Yemen, Saudi Arabi\a has opened its /doors to tourism for 】the first time.The/ fac】t is,/ Saudi has been cut off from many West\erners until】/ no【w. A\ poor i【mage in the press, alon【\gside al】legations of human 】rights abuses have put some off the idea. /That’\s \not to mentio\n 】【【the dif【ficulties in getti\n】g a vi/sa】.Now, however/, the obstacle of the 】vis/a ha\s been /removed, after 【Saudi 【/announ/ce】d its new t】ourism scheme in Septembe\r. The new tourist v】isa【 allows visi/tors from 49 countries – includin\g 】all EU n/ations i】n 【addition 】to the US/, Canada, China, Japa【n】 and 】Rus【sia among other【s】 – t\o pay \on arrival for a 90-day tourism visa/.\ It comes at a cost of 440/ S【AR plus VAT, equivalent to £9/&eu/ro;106/【9.Saudi is turning t\\o tourism in place of oilEu\ronews / \Rachel Gr\ahamThe 】】tourism board hopes the n\e【w v【isa will make it easier for people \to\ discover the land for themselv/es. And it&rsquo【;【s fair to sa\y there /is much m】ore to/ 】discover than \many realise.Read mo\re |【An unfilt【ered【 g【uid】e to getti【ng a/round in】 Saudi A【rabiaMuch of Saudi Arabia/ /wa/s un】der【wa【ter 】mil\lions of 【years a【go, and it s】h/ows\ in the landscape wit/h r/ocks ju】tting out ac【ross th】e dese【【\rt, forming wha\t used to be shelv】【es and cor】al 【reefs. Meanw】hile, the Red Sea coast as it is now is 】\a sight simil/ar to that of the Maldives. There are more than\ /1,100 tin/y, and\ com【p】letely undevelope】d, 】【/is【\lands that】 【】are home /to w【onders【 of【 n/ature.Madein Saleh, near Al UlaEuronews / R】a【chel GrahamThe western coastline fe【ature\s 】】island】s reminiscent of the Mal/divesEuronews / Rachel【\ G】rahamBut for Westerners to unco/ver th\e s\ights and sounds of 】Sa/udi, t】】】hey&r【squo;d have to be convinced that either their negat\ive percept】ions have been ex】a//ggerated or that the country has changed. \So, how liberal【 is Sau【di Arab【ia a【】bout【 to /become in its bid 【】to e【nchant\】 /tourists? A\nd at what co/st?Crown Prince Mohammed B】in S\alman is\ 】said to be behind the drive /f/or Saudi to ditc】h【 its reliance o/【n oil,\ /an】d move tow\ards other form】s of】 in/com/e. A shining jewel of that 【plan is for Saudi Arabia/ /to/ be/come【 a hub for internatio/\nal tou\rism.Supe】r citi【esIt 【has【 experience of tourism as the site \of 【the world&rsq【uo;s\ largest/ pilgrimage si\te at Mec/ca, seeing nearly 1.9 million】 non-Saudi Musli/ms make the Hajj\ pil】grimage over /the course of just a few days la【st yea【r. But no【w, the coun\tr】y】 is gearing up\/ to position i/t【self as a \luxury destination】.It is spending hundreds of/ billio】n【s【 \on \new i/n\frastruc【ture and a trio of gig【aprojects th/ro\u【ghout\ the country to \m】ake it more appealing/ to disc\erning visitors.\ These 】audacious pl/ans include 】building Saudi Arabia’s fir】st ski slop/e ins【i\de Riyadh】&rsq\u】o;s upcoming Mall Of 【Arabi\a shop\ping 】cent/re, 】\and creating the Neom super cit【y on Saudi’s Re【d Se\a coast.What wil\l \soon b】e Neom is \cur\ren\tly part of 【an/ 800km stretch of coastline s\outh /】o【f t】he bord】er with/ Jordan. A\】s it stands,\ it /doesn’\t ye【t feature a single fiv】e】-star hotel or r/es/o】rt.M/ultiple so/urc】es \\t【old Euronews Living th\at the Saudi go】v】ern/ment】 was in “advanced talks&rdq\uo; /to allow】 alcohol in /the country, 】nea/ring\ the /stage of being “rea】dy to sign” agre】ements /permitting alco】】hol in resorts such as N【eom. Currently possessi\on of or trade in alcohol is prohibi/ted, /】leading to 【se\v】ere punishments including imprisonment fo\r those cau/g\ht flouting the rules【.Shou/ld thos【e new】 r\egu/lat】【i】o\ns com】e to fruition, bo\oze wil【l become jus】t a\ small pa/rt o】【f the attract】io】n.The gove\r/【n/ment has said it is c\omm】itted t/o maintaining S/audi&rsquo】/;【s \uniqu【e s【/el\ling point\【, which bring//s together landscapes like t\hose of the U/S’s grand canyon】, the Maldives&rsquo/;/ seas and 】ancient c】ultural attra/ctions. T/his\ 【would mean sustainable】 tou\rism manag【\ement and premium positioning, sa】/y offic【ials.Al Ul】a is set to become 'th\e world's biggest liv\ing mus】eum'Euronews /【 Rachel GrahamS】ustainability/“Once we identify an e/nvironme】nt, we pu/t a coastal management plan into place,&rd【quo; s【ays Captain 】Ahmed/【 Shaker, associate director of the Marina &【amp; Yac】ht Club at King Abdul/lah Economic Centr/e north of Jeddah.“So if we】 \find a be】/ach //w\here turt/les nest, it&】rsquo/;ll be/ of\f-limits except to very small【 n\umbers of conserv【ationist\s and eco-tourists w\ho’ll access the】m in a way that doesn’t distu【rb the wildlife. We’re e】xpecting sport fishing to becom//e a big\ part of the tourism push, and【 there i/t will b】e all about catc\h and r/elease.&rdquo】;Saudi Arabia plans to【 a/ttra\ct tour】\ists to th\【e Jedd】ah coastline for /sp/ort fi】shing \【and divingKAECAmaala is a zero carbon/ resort coming to Saudi A【r】abi\a's /west coastAmaalaShaker i/s passionate abo【ut p/reser【vin/g /\the ocean/s \surrounding hi【s home【land. “/Working】 a】s a scuba instructor in Sharm El Sh】e/ikh in th】e late 80s, I saw th/e transformatio【n a\s it became a dest/ination】 【for mass tour/ism and watched as the co】rals got so rui】ned, it wa\s h】ard】ly/ w/orth diving anymo\r\e. That’\s when 】\it b/ecame a nightlife resort instead, be【cau【se 【the n】atu【ral be/auty was gone】.”Inla\nd, a project【 named 【Amaala is ai/ming for a carbon n\eutra\l buil【d/ and final【 result. It is set to feature a 【mar】ine conservation/ \ce/ntre and state of/ the art h】ea/th facil【ities in addition to luxury, sol/a】r-powered ho/tels.R/ead more | How do you make/ 】a /】luxury tourist【 destin\ation zero carbon?T【he kind of pers【\o】n likely to /make use of these /facilities are advent】urers 】- those 【\a/ttracted by t\he culture and unknown qua】ntity t\hat makes Saudi Ar【abi【a a mysterious destination, says UK based tou\/rism co【【nsultant /Roger Goodacre.\The\ coast】al region of Tabu】k is set to b【ecome encom】passed by NeomEuronews / Rachel Graham"/Saudi 】is hardly i/n danger of be\coming a mass/ tourism destination," he says. "It's someon/e who wa【nts to explor【e【【 things they\【 haven't b\een able\ to before who will visit, and there 】will be some drawn by the/ Red Sea】 Coa\st. It's p】erhaps /【the 【last unspoiled di/ving d【estination of its kind on Ear\th."Cur【rently, he's working on a project to 】quadrupl【e the n【umber of pilgrims visiting Mecca \each year, /but sees n/o object to non-Musli\ms enj】oying\ it. "Most 】people don't let their political views】 colo\ur t】heir choi】ce of holiday destinations."/How Western】 wi\ll Saudi/ go?Tac\o Bell res\】taurants, Domino's 【pizza jo【in【ts, Dunkin' \Donu\ts coffee shops a】lr【eady \line/ the /streets【 o】f Riyadh/, provin】g the Saudi p\eople /have】 already develo\ped quite/ a taste for some Western \s\t\aple】s.Meanwhil】e/, liberalisation is well underw【/ay, according to Good】acre. "Th\e religi\ou/s police [the mutaween] d【on't have anywhere【 near as much po/w】er as they \used 【to," he】 tells 】】Euronews Living."S/ocially, it\'s consid/erably more relaxe】d now, es【pecially in Jeddah【 where you're less likel\y】 to see he/a【d 【coverings, a/nd more likely to see w】om】e/n【 driving, cycling】 a/long the prome【nades and mixing of\ sexes. I【t wou\ld all have been \unthinka】ble/ until r】ecently."Read mo/re |\Trio of \eco hotels to open/ n/ext doo/r t】o 【UN【E\SCO World Heritag】e siteThe r】e【pressive】 stat\e that 【many envision is/ open【 to further cha/nge, add】】s Ahmad A\l-Khateeb, c【ha】ir\man 【of the】 Saudi Commission for Tourism and Natio\nal Heritage.“Once you o/pen the doors, it’s ve\ry difficult【 to close \them 【once more,” he says. 】After all,【 the commission w/ant \visitors to be “surprise】d and【 delighted by the trea\【sures we hav\e to sha/re&rdq/u\o;. H】e counts among them\ “five UNESCO /World Heritage S/ites,\ a vibr/ant/ local cu】lt\ure and bre】athtaking natural beauty&\rdquo;.Ar/chi【tecture in t/he capital is 【thor/oughly mod【ern\/Amr AlMadani, CEO of /the【 Royal Com\missi/on fo【r AlUla, stresses that you h【ave to have 【li【v/\ed in Saudi Arabia long e\nough to see t/he change, but po】【ints \to lifting the【 】ban on【 w【omen driving l/ast year as a pivot】al moment.Now, he wan//ts 】to mak/e AlUla - \which form\ed t】he s/o/uth\er【n h/ub \of the ancient\ Nabatean civilisation - t【he “large【st living mu】seum in the world&【rdquo;. Opening to tourism for th【em【 means revealing【 a place th\【/at connects humans, culture and 】nature."We think of AlUla as \Petra plus," he sa/ys, referring to the】 Nab/atean c\api】tal region in Jord/an 【that has become a hub f】or hist【\ory b/uffs and tourists.And 【\th【e question of the coveri\ng u/p? It is per】】haps /one of\ th【e first images【 conjured for man】y when think of Saudi Ar【abia. However wearing the \abaya isn't manda\tory for f\oreign【 visitors【, says AlMadani. "But the type of tourist we're exp】ect/ing to attract is respectful of the cul】】/ture.&rd\quo;Ultimately, \opening the floodgates to tourism wh\ile maint【】ai【ni】ng/ respect 】for Saudi&r\squo;s cul/tural heritage and natu【ral env【ironment may be to】ugh. But it is the challenge its government ha【s chos/en. With their confidence 【bol\stered by the pre\mium p/rice po【int an/d curren】t【 dear【th of wat/ering holes likely to s\c【are /of/f bargain hunters, they【 may yet succeed\.【Madein Saleh, 【near Al UlaEuronews / Rachel Graha/mShare【 】this a\rticle 【【 More from places4D2U

L0rJWATCH | From castles to cabins, \these homes/\ 】w【ere 】ma\de of wa】stevRx3

XL2b“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207Robinson Crusoe isl\and sets example】 fo】】r/ 】the world in con\ser/vation 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsOmZ6QAL6

2VWmTide turns f/or an Italian coas\tal wa/steland【/5Nba

03UmAnimal conserva【tion "a gove】rnment priority" says U】nited Arab EmiratesTmVp

esIbIc【eland's lar】gest national p\ark is h】oping to【 /gain UNESCO World\ Herit\age sta】tus at UN committe】e talks in】 Azerbaijan/.Vatnajökull Nati【onal Pa】rk is home to vast glaciers, utterly uni\nh【abit【ed land and ten ac\】tive v\olcanos. Despite the presence of o\p】posing elements/, the great land】scape h\as remained st【ab【l/e【 for/ more than 1,000 years. The meltin【g ice from the /glaciers f【uels some of Iceland'】s most powerful rivers. T】he seasonal ebb 】and flo\w of the ice 】i】s 【crit】ical in mainta/】】ining the/ sta】】bilit\y of the ecosystem of】 /Vatnaj&o】um】】l/;kull\, wh】ich covers 14% of Iceland.Now, however, r/ising temperatures are causing the gl【aciers to melt at unprec/e/d【ented rates. Every/ y\ear, more ice disappears,/ r/evea【ling 】new la\nd underneath the glaciers. In the/ last \century】 alone】, Vatnajök\ull has lost 10% of its volume.The a/re【a is so unlike /anyth】ing else /o\n earth that it has been used as a case study by as/tronauts. In the months pr\eceding the Apollo 11 mission in the late six\ties, Neil Armstrong and his c/olleagues visited the 】park to \study its l】un【ar】-like/ terrain. Som/e a】reas\ of Vatnajökull Nati\onal Park are utterly uninhabited by /lif】e, \be it animal o/r plan\t, render\ing it an ideal】 place to \stud\y moon-like geology.Water, fire /and ice, the elemen/ts that】 make up 【the uniqu\e park【 ar【e represen】ted on t/he nati\onal f\lag of /Ice\la】n【d, blue fo/r water, red for fire, and white】/ for ice. If granted /Wor\ld Heritage Sta【tu】s, Va\tnajöku】ll National Park】 \wil【l b【e the third】 Icelandic site to】 a\chieve the status.Want more【 news?】Video editor • Fr\ancois RazyShare this a【\/rtic】leCopy/pa\ste the 【ar【ticle video emb】ed /link【 bel【ow:CopyShareTweet【S//ha\resen\dShareTweet\SharesendMoreHid【eShar【eSendShareShareShareSe】ndShareShareYou m【ig/ht also l/ike 】 】 / \ 【 / 【 \ \Climate Change top of t\he agen\da as No【rdic mi【niste/rs m/ee】t /Germ/any's Merkel in Iceland 】 【 【 / 【 【【 \ 【\ \Tens of t】housands of Estonian】s perfo/rm mass folk singin【g 】 / \ 】【 Well-being agenda: d/oes this spell/ the e\nd for GDP? \ 】 More abou\t20-seconds【Icel\andEnvironmental protec/tionUNESCO Cultur】a/l 】Heritage ListEnviro/nment / 【 Browse today�【39;s ta】gsdldS

Wa】t/ch: Iceland's meltin/g \Vatna/jökull Nat\ional Park fights for/ Wor】【ld\ Heritage Statu】s【

xczoA fish\y】 b/usiness: EU poli\ticians are risking o】ur fu【t【ure by 】gambling on our nat】】ural resource/s | ViewCkKf

gHrCAt the s\troke of midnight on Tuesday, Italy said good\bye to c\otton bu】ds, as \the New Year ushe/red】 in 【the country\'s latest push to eliminate single\-use plastic produc】【ts./】Fro/m Ja【nuary 1, it is forbidd/en to/ \pr【\od\uce\ or 】\【sel【l /non-biodegradable or comp\ostable cotton buds.】/ Packaging will also h】ave【 to indicate 【the rule\s/ 【for proper 【di【sposal.Cotton buds account for\ about 9% of waste f【oun/d on 】Italian\ beac\h【e【s】 &/mda/sh; an average of about 60 sticks per beac/h.Italy is the fi【rst European Un【ion country to implement\ s【uch a ban but it won't be the last. In O/ctober, th/e European Parliament voted t\o o【utl】aw most/ si/ngle/-use plastics, start/ing【\ in 20/21.Next New Year's Day, Italy will\ bring i【n【 a\ ban on【 c【o\smetics cont/a【ining microplastics. T【hese are tiny plas【tics g】r】ai\ns found in some exf/oliants and】 detergents 【t\ha】t end \u【p in river】s \and seas, whe】re they are e\aten by fish【 an】d integrated into the【 food chain.Brussels has warned that by 2】050 th】ere wil/l be more 【plastic in th【e /oceans than fish, if nothing is done.Shar\e t/hi/s \articleShareTweetSha【resendShareT\wee【tShar【e【sendMoreHideShareSendSh【areSh\areShareSendShareShareYo/u might a\lso like 【 2/018 Review【: Single-】use plastics to be ban\ned \in EU 【 / 】 【 】 \ QUIZ: So you /think y\ou know about plastic pollution? Test your knowledge now / \ \ / Which Europea【】n countries are th【e \best and worst/ /at r【ec】y\clin\g plastic【 waste/? 】【 【 【 More aboutplasticMicroplasticsEn/vir】onm【【ental protection / Bro】wse tod【\ay's tags4sCV

M7hFProtecting life in the Arcti\【c seasKdVO

wDQ0Text s】izeAaAaBlack /cavi【ar was \a delicacy alread【y back i\n the 】】days of Gen\ghis Khan in the\ 12’s. In the 1550&rsqu\】】o;s】, Fra/ncois Rabela\is called it/ the finest pre-main-course/ tre\at out there. The kings and the tsars【 of Euro\pe】 enjoyed th\i】】【s\ fine food throughout the centuries. I【n our days, the roe of stur\geon is synonymous with luxurious living on 】televis】ion (think James Bond) and】 in real life.Getting the c】aviar, h/owever, is in】herently unsustainab\le: to get the fish eggs, f\e【male fish a】re hauled out【 of the waters s【hortly before they are me/ant to spawn and 【sliced open for t/hei/r row, which r】esu/lts in their death. So it is【 hardly a surprise that the s】【tu【rgeon’【s numbers h/a【ve been in an ala\rmingly rapid de【cline, so much so that in【 2001 a UN conventio/n banned fishing sturge\on in \its natu\ral habit/at altogether.A young sturgeon \fishK【asperskianTh】e key wo/rds are &ldq\uo;in its natural habitat&rdq\uo;. The ban/ made the br【ightest/ minds in bio/logy thin】k of \w】ays t【o get /】t【he female sturgeon’s precious cargo without bre【ak【ing the/ law. To circum\vent/ this piece of legislation, the most ob\vious \method was 】t\o cr/】eate fi【sh farms, whic\h technically do not /constitute a nat】ural environment. Such fish farms are quite 【c】ommon in China a/n】d slightly less so in Russia and Nort】h Amer\ica. B【ut to get this 【caviar to th\e】 European market 】with/out【 it \rottin\g, C】hinese pr【】oducers are【 forced to 】use/ /che/mical preservati\ves, which a/re banned/ i】n Japan a\nd in the US – b【ut 【not in Euro【pe.I\f you】&rsqu/【】o;re a fan of 】the delicacy, he/re&rsquo\;s /the good news: there is a h【andful of b/lack caviar producers \/out t【here/ that【 】are\】 \do\ing it【 sustainably &ndash\】; without killing the fis/h – thanks to a method wh\ereby\ the eggs are “mas】saged&【\】rdquo\; out right before spawn\ing. The/ sligh/tly 【worse news is that】 tho【se fish eggs】 /are pa\steu【rized, meaning the end product is not fresh but boil【ed.Luckily,【】 one produc\/er stan/ds out in 】par\t/icul//ar. 【/Swiss-based Kasperski【an purc/hased the right to use a 【technology pat\en/t\ed by Russian bi/ologist Li】liya Kop\ylenko and ar】e the o【nly produ\c\er 【in the world that provides discernin【】/g foodies “caviar\ with life”, w【hich is sustainable, /et【hical/ and as fresh a\/s it can be】】\ all at the sam/e t【ime. Th】e company wa/s founded in 2014 by 【Nes【tle】&\rsquo;s C/【EO Peter Bra\beck-Letmath】e and his【 long-\time friend Konst\antin Sidorov.Konstan\tin 【Sidoro【v (secon/d \from righ\t) at an\ eventKasperski】an“Producing】\ h】igh qual/i】ty bla】ck c/aviar in a sustainable 】way, withou】t killing th】e/】 fish, is e】xtremel】y co【mpl\ex and costly. The difficulty lies not s【o much in ki【lling or【 not killing the fish, but rather in how to process 】the fish eggs a【fterwards to gu\/arantee 】their f/reshness without r/】esort/in/g to the use 【of ch/emicals,” Konstantin Sidorov explained.Fresh/ caviar 【is a live【 prod】uct, 【much like oysters, so you cannot \keep it 【fresh for long. One of t/he biggest problems【, accordin\g to K【onsta/ntin,【 is that tra\ditio\nally/ the p】eak season f\o/r black caviar consum\ption is aroun\d【 the tim\e of C【hristmas and New Yea【r but the s\turg\eon 【usually spawns in \late】 s】prin\g, ar】ound May. There is a \speci【a【l vacuum te【\c\hnol】ogy that c】an k】eep t/he caviar fresh up【 to three months witho/ut havi/ng 】to process i】t or add any kind of pre】servatives /but that bri【ngs \us 【only to August - \still a 】way aw】ay from the /holiday season.The paten】ted technolo\gy used by Kasperski【an \at their fi【s】h fa/rm allows for to\】tal control of】 the\/ fish&rsq【u/o;s environment: what \it eats【 (a factor tha/t can/】 rea】lly affect【【 the】 qualit/y \of the ro【e】), as well as the lig/ht and the tem】p/erature, meaning they can simulate late spring in【 September by\ increas】ing the\ wat\er t】empera\ture and amount of light.\ And【 thus【 c/】onsumer【】s ha\ve fresh 】and su【staina/ble caviar just in time for the \holidays. View this p/ost o】n InstagramThe\ KASPERSKIAN \Cavi\ar with Life is simpl\y】 unique】 ! #Kasperskian #CaviarWithLif【e #S\wissMadeA post s【hared by KASPERSKIA\N (@kas】per【ski\an_cavia】r) o【n Oct 31, 2018 at /1/1:10am PDT“The pool w/e use is an incredibly complex 【structure so th【e】\ costs of the【 te】chnology and main/tenance are very high, which【 reflects on the price of t】he end \product. \Quality product 【can&rs\quo;t be cheap by defini【tion./ And with w\ealth also 【comes a/ certain desire to consume co/nsciously, which means】 that】 our c/u】stomer】s are re/ady to spend more on【 a produ/ct t/hat d\i/【【d no】t cost the f\ish its l\ife. U】nfor】tunately, in our 【day and 】ag】e it&rsq/uo;s easier 】\to k【/ill a life rather th【an sav/e it so we f\eel a\ moral responsibility to sho\w that that needn&rs】quo;t always be the case,” Konstantin c/larified.The d\ecision to /b】ase p\r/oductio\】n in Sw】itzerland/ w/as\ rather/ o/bv/ious for Kons/【tantin and Peter. This country ha\s th/e h/ighest quality con【trol and als】【o rigid regulation【 w】hen it comes to animal welfa\r\e.&ld】quo;Switzerla/nd is t/he only /place that bans b【oiling lobst\ers alive】,/ f】or examp】le. \We receive weekly checks that ar【e very serio\us and thorough】【【. Th】is creates a trust in S\wiss product/s and this /is also】 wh/y our 】product is/ more expensi\ve. We【 cou/ld\ have based our /production in Russia】, which in the minds of 】most is 】t/he h\ome/ of black caviar, but \no one would\ trust that we use sustaina【ble and /ethical methods t/o extract/ it,” Konstantin said. Vie\w this pos/t on InstagramA lunch of dre/ams at Cuck\oo Sushi Club in Zer】mat【t with some Alaska/n Crab Roll with Caviar and Ma【ndar/in Snow/, Lan【goustine Roll with Truffle Sno】w and fin【\al】ly Kasp/erskian Caviar with Life/ ! #Kasperskian #CaviarWi/t【hLife #Sw/issMadeA post shared by KASPER\SKIAN【 (@kaspe\【rskia/n_caviar) on Dec 30, 2【018 at 10:02am PSTBlack caviar /in Zermatt, Switze】rlandI\n a/ddition to the commitment to /the fish’s welfare, \/Kasperskia【n aims to reduc\e【 its impac\/t on the envi/ro】n/ment b\y producin】g \its own e】lectricity \t/hrough so【lar panels and trea/ting /al【l water\s to preserve【\ the\ lo\cal wild fauna and f/lora.Over the years, the caviar producer has made friends in high place】s【 and partner\ed up 【w/ith esteemed\ brands such \as LV】MH, Dom Pérignon an/d Christie】&rsq】/u/o【;s. Aside fro\m ap\plying susta【ina【ble methods/ 【to bl】ack caviar producti】on, Kasperskian also spon\sors/ cha\rit【y】 events lik/e Russian super 【mod【el Natalia Vodionova’s N】aked Heart Gala d/in/ners 【and the】 M\onte Carlo Gal\a\ for the Global Ocean.At the moment, thos】e wh【o wan/\t to t【aste the upscale\ treat can\ find it/ in S】wiss stores like 】Globus【 and \Migros, Swiss sk】i resorts like Zermatt and St. \Moritz\ or 【London clu【bs/ and restauran【ts】 lik【e 67 Pall Mall【, 】/Ocean House, Marivan\na\,【 Bea】st and a f/ew others. View this post o/n /InstagramK】\asperskian C【aviar at 【Mari Vanna Restau/rant (@mar】ivannalondon) in L【ondon Knightsbr】idge. #Ca\/viarWi\thLife #MarivannaA \p】ost shared b\y /KASPERSKIAN (@kasperskian_cavia/r) o【n\ Dec】 7, 2018 at 1/0:/12am】 P【STKaspers】kian caviar i\/n Lon\don's Marivanna\ 【restaurantShare this articl/e / More from wellnessOTtm

VI18Why I quit my job at Vogue 】to li/ve in a tree for a yea/rSlDZ

TVByM\apping /the 【Arctic\ sea lifeonta

L1G5Te】xt sizeAaAaIn th\e shadow of \t【he f】irst/ a】nnive】rsary of/ jo【urnalist Jamal Khashoggi’s 】murder an\d\ amid escalating tensions in neighbouring Yemen, Saudi Arabi\a has opened its /doors to tourism for 】the first time.The/ fac】t is,/ Saudi has been cut off from many West\erners until】/ no【w. A\ poor i【mage in the press, alon【\gside al】legations of human 】rights abuses have put some off the idea. /That’\s \not to mentio\n 】【【the dif【ficulties in getti\n】g a vi/sa】.Now, however/, the obstacle of the 】vis/a ha\s been /removed, after 【Saudi 【/announ/ce】d its new t】ourism scheme in Septembe\r. The new tourist v】isa【 allows visi/tors from 49 countries – includin\g 】all EU n/ations i】n 【addition 】to the US/, Canada, China, Japa【n】 and 】Rus【sia among other【s】 – t\o pay \on arrival for a 90-day tourism visa/.\ It comes at a cost of 440/ S【AR plus VAT, equivalent to £9/&eu/ro;106/【9.Saudi is turning t\\o tourism in place of oilEu\ronews / \Rachel Gr\ahamThe 】】tourism board hopes the n\e【w v【isa will make it easier for people \to\ discover the land for themselv/es. And it&rsquo【;【s fair to sa\y there /is much m】ore to/ 】discover than \many realise.Read mo\re |【An unfilt【ered【 g【uid】e to getti【ng a/round in】 Saudi A【rabiaMuch of Saudi Arabia/ /wa/s un】der【wa【ter 】mil\lions of 【years a【go, and it s】h/ows\ in the landscape wit/h r/ocks ju】tting out ac【ross th】e dese【【\rt, forming wha\t used to be shelv】【es and cor】al 【reefs. Meanw】hile, the Red Sea coast as it is now is 】\a sight simil/ar to that of the Maldives. There are more than\ /1,100 tin/y, and\ com【p】letely undevelope】d, 】【/is【\lands that】 【】are home /to w【onders【 of【 n/ature.Madein Saleh, near Al UlaEuronews / R】a【chel GrahamThe western coastline fe【ature\s 】】island】s reminiscent of the Mal/divesEuronews / Rachel【\ G】rahamBut for Westerners to unco/ver th\e s\ights and sounds of 】Sa/udi, t】】】hey&r【squo;d have to be convinced that either their negat\ive percept】ions have been ex】a//ggerated or that the country has changed. \So, how liberal【 is Sau【di Arab【ia a【】bout【 to /become in its bid 【】to e【nchant\】 /tourists? A\nd at what co/st?Crown Prince Mohammed B】in S\alman is\ 】said to be behind the drive /f/or Saudi to ditc】h【 its reliance o/【n oil,\ /an】d move tow\ards other form】s of】 in/com/e. A shining jewel of that 【plan is for Saudi Arabia/ /to/ be/come【 a hub for internatio/\nal tou\rism.Supe】r citi【esIt 【has【 experience of tourism as the site \of 【the world&rsq【uo;s\ largest/ pilgrimage si\te at Mec/ca, seeing nearly 1.9 million】 non-Saudi Musli/ms make the Hajj\ pil】grimage over /the course of just a few days la【st yea【r. But no【w, the coun\tr】y】 is gearing up\/ to position i/t【self as a \luxury destination】.It is spending hundreds of/ billio】n【s【 \on \new i/n\frastruc【ture and a trio of gig【aprojects th/ro\u【ghout\ the country to \m】ake it more appealing/ to disc\erning visitors.\ These 】audacious pl/ans include 】building Saudi Arabia’s fir】st ski slop/e ins【i\de Riyadh】&rsq\u】o;s upcoming Mall Of 【Arabi\a shop\ping 】cent/re, 】\and creating the Neom super cit【y on Saudi’s Re【d Se\a coast.What wil\l \soon b】e Neom is \cur\ren\tly part of 【an/ 800km stretch of coastline s\outh /】o【f t】he bord】er with/ Jordan. A\】s it stands,\ it /doesn’\t ye【t feature a single fiv】e】-star hotel or r/es/o】rt.M/ultiple so/urc】es \\t【old Euronews Living th\at the Saudi go】v】ern/ment】 was in “advanced talks&rdq\uo; /to allow】 alcohol in /the country, 】nea/ring\ the /stage of being “rea】dy to sign” agre】ements /permitting alco】】hol in resorts such as N【eom. Currently possessi\on of or trade in alcohol is prohibi/ted, /】leading to 【se\v】ere punishments including imprisonment fo\r those cau/g\ht flouting the rules【.Shou/ld thos【e new】 r\egu/lat】【i】o\ns com】e to fruition, bo\oze wil【l become jus】t a\ small pa/rt o】【f the attract】io】n.The gove\r/【n/ment has said it is c\omm】itted t/o maintaining S/audi&rsquo】/;【s \uniqu【e s【/el\ling point\【, which bring//s together landscapes like t\hose of the U/S’s grand canyon】, the Maldives&rsquo/;/ seas and 】ancient c】ultural attra/ctions. T/his\ 【would mean sustainable】 tou\rism manag【\ement and premium positioning, sa】/y offic【ials.Al Ul】a is set to become 'th\e world's biggest liv\ing mus】eum'Euronews /【 Rachel GrahamS】ustainability/“Once we identify an e/nvironme】nt, we pu/t a coastal management plan into place,&rd【quo; s【ays Captain 】Ahmed/【 Shaker, associate director of the Marina &【amp; Yac】ht Club at King Abdul/lah Economic Centr/e north of Jeddah.“So if we】 \find a be】/ach //w\here turt/les nest, it&】rsquo/;ll be/ of\f-limits except to very small【 n\umbers of conserv【ationist\s and eco-tourists w\ho’ll access the】m in a way that doesn’t distu【rb the wildlife. We’re e】xpecting sport fishing to becom//e a big\ part of the tourism push, and【 there i/t will b】e all about catc\h and r/elease.&rdquo】;Saudi Arabia plans to【 a/ttra\ct tour】\ists to th\【e Jedd】ah coastline for /sp/ort fi】shing \【and divingKAECAmaala is a zero carbon/ resort coming to Saudi A【r】abi\a's /west coastAmaalaShaker i/s passionate abo【ut p/reser【vin/g /\the ocean/s \surrounding hi【s home【land. “/Working】 a】s a scuba instructor in Sharm El Sh】e/ikh in th】e late 80s, I saw th/e transformatio【n a\s it became a dest/ination】 【for mass tour/ism and watched as the co】rals got so rui】ned, it wa\s h】ard】ly/ w/orth diving anymo\r\e. That’\s when 】\it b/ecame a nightlife resort instead, be【cau【se 【the n】atu【ral be/auty was gone】.”Inla\nd, a project【 named 【Amaala is ai/ming for a carbon n\eutra\l buil【d/ and final【 result. It is set to feature a 【mar】ine conservation/ \ce/ntre and state of/ the art h】ea/th facil【ities in addition to luxury, sol/a】r-powered ho/tels.R/ead more | How do you make/ 】a /】luxury tourist【 destin\ation zero carbon?T【he kind of pers【\o】n likely to /make use of these /facilities are advent】urers 】- those 【\a/ttracted by t\he culture and unknown qua】ntity t\hat makes Saudi Ar【abi【a a mysterious destination, says UK based tou\/rism co【【nsultant /Roger Goodacre.\The\ coast】al region of Tabu】k is set to b【ecome encom】passed by NeomEuronews / Rachel Graham"/Saudi 】is hardly i/n danger of be\coming a mass/ tourism destination," he says. "It's someon/e who wa【nts to explor【e【【 things they\【 haven't b\een able\ to before who will visit, and there 】will be some drawn by the/ Red Sea】 Coa\st. It's p】erhaps /【the 【last unspoiled di/ving d【estination of its kind on Ear\th."Cur【rently, he's working on a project to 】quadrupl【e the n【umber of pilgrims visiting Mecca \each year, /but sees n/o object to non-Musli\ms enj】oying\ it. "Most 】people don't let their political views】 colo\ur t】heir choi】ce of holiday destinations."/How Western】 wi\ll Saudi/ go?Tac\o Bell res\】taurants, Domino's 【pizza jo【in【ts, Dunkin' \Donu\ts coffee shops a】lr【eady \line/ the /streets【 o】f Riyadh/, provin】g the Saudi p\eople /have】 already develo\ped quite/ a taste for some Western \s\t\aple】s.Meanwhil】e/, liberalisation is well underw【/ay, according to Good】acre. "Th\e religi\ou/s police [the mutaween] d【on't have anywhere【 near as much po/w】er as they \used 【to," he】 tells 】】Euronews Living."S/ocially, it\'s consid/erably more relaxe】d now, es【pecially in Jeddah【 where you're less likel\y】 to see he/a【d 【coverings, a/nd more likely to see w】om】e/n【 driving, cycling】 a/long the prome【nades and mixing of\ sexes. I【t wou\ld all have been \unthinka】ble/ until r】ecently."Read mo/re |\Trio of \eco hotels to open/ n/ext doo/r t】o 【UN【E\SCO World Heritag】e siteThe r】e【pressive】 stat\e that 【many envision is/ open【 to further cha/nge, add】】s Ahmad A\l-Khateeb, c【ha】ir\man 【of the】 Saudi Commission for Tourism and Natio\nal Heritage.“Once you o/pen the doors, it’s ve\ry difficult【 to close \them 【once more,” he says. 】After all,【 the commission w/ant \visitors to be “surprise】d and【 delighted by the trea\【sures we hav\e to sha/re&rdq/u\o;. H】e counts among them\ “five UNESCO /World Heritage S/ites,\ a vibr/ant/ local cu】lt\ure and bre】athtaking natural beauty&\rdquo;.Ar/chi【tecture in t/he capital is 【thor/oughly mod【ern\/Amr AlMadani, CEO of /the【 Royal Com\missi/on fo【r AlUla, stresses that you h【ave to have 【li【v/\ed in Saudi Arabia long e\nough to see t/he change, but po】【ints \to lifting the【 】ban on【 w【omen driving l/ast year as a pivot】al moment.Now, he wan//ts 】to mak/e AlUla - \which form\ed t】he s/o/uth\er【n h/ub \of the ancient\ Nabatean civilisation - t【he “large【st living mu】seum in the world&【rdquo;. Opening to tourism for th【em【 means revealing【 a place th\【/at connects humans, culture and 】nature."We think of AlUla as \Petra plus," he sa/ys, referring to the】 Nab/atean c\api】tal region in Jord/an 【that has become a hub f】or hist【\ory b/uffs and tourists.And 【\th【e question of the coveri\ng u/p? It is per】】haps /one of\ th【e first images【 conjured for man】y when think of Saudi Ar【abia. However wearing the \abaya isn't manda\tory for f\oreign【 visitors【, says AlMadani. "But the type of tourist we're exp】ect/ing to attract is respectful of the cul】】/ture.&rd\quo;Ultimately, \opening the floodgates to tourism wh\ile maint【】ai【ni】ng/ respect 】for Saudi&r\squo;s cul/tural heritage and natu【ral env【ironment may be to】ugh. But it is the challenge its government ha【s chos/en. With their confidence 【bol\stered by the pre\mium p/rice po【int an/d curren】t【 dear【th of wat/ering holes likely to s\c【are /of/f bargain hunters, they【 may yet succeed\.【Madein Saleh, 【near Al UlaEuronews / Rachel Graha/mShare【 】this a\rticle 【【 More from places5CtR

pjseTe/x【t sizeAaAaA few hundred【 kilo】m【etres 】off the Pacific coast of Ch\ile there is \a 】paradise for div【ers and hikers.The Robin\son \C【rus【oe island i】s one of the three for【】ming the Juan Fern\ande\z archipelago.The islan\d chain secured \its place 】in history as/ the home o】f Alexande【r Selkirk, the\ Scottis】h s\ailor】】 】marooned there for fo/ur years and four mo/nths, a tale he later related t\o Daniel Defoe\,/ who penned his 】adv\enture \book ba】sed\ on his sto【ry.For almost【 a century, the in/habitants of R【obins\o\n Cruso】e ha】ve known that their island's fragile ecosystem depends on them co/nserving its【 unique wildlife, 【s/o they【 decided about /taking step/s a/s ear】ly as 1935.In 1977, the arc/hipel\ago was named a biospher】e reserve and almost a year a【go, Chile announced the creation of the enormous Juan Ferna】ndez Marine Park, one of the largest p【rotected zo【nes i/n th\e Pacific.It al【so co】nnects to【 a network 】of marine reserves in Chile total\/ling some 】【1.】3 【m】illion squa/re /kilometres】【, meaning that about 44 perce】nt of the nation's】 waters ha】ve some lev【el of\ protection against min【】ing and indust【】rial】 fishing."Until 10 years ago, C\hile was one o\f the bi】ggest o】cean exp\】loiters i\n the world, but now i\t ha【s 】changed course】 【and be【【come o】【ne of\ the leaders【 i【n o\cean cons/ervation, /with the creation of/ hug\e marine \parks which \wi\ll】 really help /fish/ s】tocks recover," said Alex \Munoz,【\ Latin Amer】i【ca dir\【ect】or of【 the/ NGO\ Nation】al Geographic Pristine Seas.C】lick 【o/n the 】video above to learn more\ abou】t h】ow these islands preserved 】their fragile ecosyste\m【.S\hare】 thi】s【 article More fro】】m placesdBrY

tJ7mCOVID-19【: World ec\o\no/my in 2020 \to suffer \worst year since 1930s G/【reat \Dep】res】s【ion, says IMF【VklO

gMnvEthiopia breaks world \record /by\ plan】ting 350 mil\lion】 trees in one daya6wL

Ydq3Red Sea corals flourish at previously-restricte【d Israeli beachFAvV

KDZNText siz【eAaAaStar//ting】 a new business/ i\s an/】 exc【iting time, as you emb\ark on\ your entrepr】eneur【ial/ fut【ure w【ith passio【【n and/ dete】rminat【ion\. For many of u【s, n/ew ventures【 often have sust】ainability as a focus. Whether it/&rsqu【o;s【 a dr【ink, a/ clothing brand, jewellery or a café【;, many of us want commit 【to a sustainable ethos as part of our /brand. But what about our //own sustainable effort/s? After all, 】you can’t set up an eco-/focused b\rand and then n\ot pay attentio/n to the sustainabili】ty】 of your own 【working\ day. We asked experts f\or advice o/n how to be a susta】inable】 start-u\p【, from day o】ne\. Make your launch party and gifting\ susta】inablePl【anni】ng an event/ and 】gifts for customers to welco【m【e your n【ew \‘business/ baby&rsq\uo; into/ the【 world is all very well, but you n/eed to do it in 【an /eco-friendly way. Bec E/van】s is author of How to Have a Happy Hustle. She advises, “m】ove\ away fro/m bub【ble wrap envelopes, and th】ink about bi\odegradable \goody【 bag/s – and no glitter balloo/ns! 】/Think about【 plastic in gi/fts and plas\tic waste when giftin\g. It&r\squo;s a】bout showi【ng intention &nd\ash; when you set up a \business\ it’s abo\ut building a community \and workin\g w\ith ea【rly users. Think ‘do【es t【he wor/ld really n】ee/d this?’&rdq\uo;.R/ela】t【ed | 9 susta】inable economy startups a/【i】ming to\ cl【ean up o/ur future 【Make su】stainability\ a &ls】quo;/given’, not a &lsquo/;must】 do/’Jesse Tran and So\n Chu are fellow students from Vietnam who\ 】are s/tar】t】i\ng their own trainer bus】iness and their p】roducts are made f】rom recycle\d coffee cups. \Stu【dying】 in Finland, t【hey saw 】clear】 diffe/rences in 】the way thi】n\gs wer】e produced and /the/ sustaina\ble】 the way of life. The【y&rsq】uo;ve channelled /that into\ their【 brand, RENS. The pair started using an organic cott【on bu\t【 realised this would have/】【\ an environmental impact an】/d so switch】ed to a\ new fabric.\】 &l/dquo;As /millennia【ls, for 【us sustainability shou\ld be a given\,&rdquo/; sa/ys Jess/e. “We want t】o p【lay a 【role as ambassa/dor/s &nda】sh; it【&rs\quo;s /easier to liv【e a sust/ainable life in Finland!”/Rel】ated |The brands launching sunglasses mad/e fr\om human hair, milk bottles \a】nd coffee waste View this post on I\ns】ta【gramRens are【 best sh】ared with \frie【nds! #renshipA post shared by/ Rens Ori\gi【n\al (@rensoriginal) on Aug 19, 2\019 \at 9:0Animal conserva【tion "a gove】rnment priority" says U】nited Arab Emiratesa\m P/DT【Think ab/out【 the entire prod/uction chainSo you&/r】squo;ve c/hosen your start-up./ Now to find】 a way to produce】 the 【product】. Sustaina\bility needs to be considered from start /to 【f\inish. Paul Turton i/s the Man】aging Dire】ct\or at Pact, a lead\ing speciality coffee s\erv】ice. He reveals that \they know customers are more likely/ to choo/se a brand or product that h】】【as【 purpose at the he\art of the business, so you should 【consider making this a k】ey /part of your company proposition.“S/ustainability is one 【of our\ core values, from t/he \farming wor】kfor/c】e in t\he co/untries/ w】【e buy our/ coffee/ from, to the /far/ming pra\ctices, ethics, shippin/g【, wa【/rehous】e【\s and roasting of the co】ffee,” he says. &l】dquo;It wouldn't be r】ig】ht to ask peop/le to work in 】a【 way that doesn't s】how us up】\holding our own standard/s - /no ma/tte/r the 【size of our busines\s.&rdqu\o;Jesse and【 Son fr\om Rens agree that their biggest tip【 is to 】find 【a g/ood/ sustainable base】. They work /from Aalto universit】y. &ldq】uo;Th【e lights are/ all aut/omat/ic, and\ everything is optimis/ed【/\,” sa】ys Jesse.Is your office space susta/i/nability-f【r】iendly?According to Bec Evans, “happiness is the j\ump】ing-off】 point【 【【for【 becoming a\ &lsq【uo;si】\d】e h/ustler’, and one of】 the reaso/ns si/de hus\tles are growing 】so 】much is \b】ecause you】 can work /from【 /anywhere\.” So\ that/&】rsquo;s a g】ood place to s\tart 【&n】dash; is yo】ur chosen place /of work】 sustaina】ble? Whether it’s at home】, a 【co/-w】ork/ing【 space o\r ren/【ted of\fic\e, y\ou need】 t\o c\onsider everything from the recycling p】\olicy to energ/y use.Susan Steven\s, /a CEO and Founder o【f/ 【M/a/de 【with R【espect ad/ds, “balancing between business objectives /and sus【tainability is ve【ry hard】 in the modern wo【】r【ld. \Our current【 business \model i/s b【ased \on con\】/sumerism, brands fighting for more an\d more】 sales, making customers buy thing【s they don【’t n【e】ed and have \t/【o th\row t【hem awa/y 】i/n a mon】\th or two.\ App】r\oxi\m】ately 1.3 bil\lion tons o/f 【wa【ste is 】prod】uced globally each year, this numb【er is ex【pected to increase to 2.2 billion tons p/\e/【r year by 2025】. This is alarming.”R】elated /| 5 s】tunning examples/ of/ g\reen architecture around the worldCommit to /recyclingThis may f\ee\l li\k\e /a more obvious one,\ but recycling can get forgotten 【when \you&rsquo/;re wonderi/ng abo【ut the provenance of the /cotton for those new bags you’re mak【ing\. Keep/ a kee【n eye on the re\cycling \opt】ions at your wor【kplace and of your prod\uct, expert【s sa】y. Paul Tur】to\n/ adds, &ld【quo\;it&rs】quo;s good 【to get into good /habits fr【om t/he start, then when the busi\ness/ gro】ws, it’s already ingrained in t】he cult/ure/. People don&r\squo;t o\ften r】ealise【 you can 】even \recycle used coffee grounds, it’\s best\【\ to seek out/ sup/pli【er/s【 who 】can help you do this, we use First Mile\ Rec【\ycling】 a\n【d Bio-Bean 【or simply \get a compost【 bin in the o【ffice.&r/dq/uo;First Mile founder】 and CE\O, Br】uce Bratley, adds, “when it 【com】es to recycling, it【's【 i】mport\ant to remember that no【t all was【te companies deal wit\h wa】ste in the same w【ay. 】It'\s essent【ial t\o ide\nt/ify one tha\t will\ continue you】r sustainabi\li【ty effo】rts aft【er you/r waste leaves yo\ur pr】emises to 【avoid it ending up in landfill sites where it will pr【o【duce green】h【ouses gases, such as metha】ne.”\Fi【】nd people who】 are on the sa\me sustainab】ility /page as \you\Wo/\rking with like-minded peop【le will mean y【ou】 develop \a st】rong sustain】ability】 mantra across the d\ay and into the future. David Ke】lly, Gener\al Manager \for \Eu【rope, Middle East and】 Africa a【t Deputy】, a co【mpa】\ny /that w\orks with】 lots of start-ups, s\ays, &\ldquo;to grow/ sustainably and /re/tain talent, you need/ to b】rin\g people on the j】ou/r/ney with you.】 Pay th/em pro【perly a【nd\ on time and prove wor】k w/il/l fit into their\ lif【e. In/ve\sting【 in tools that allow you to /d】o【 thi】s wi\l【l bu】ild 【trust amongst a dedicated work【f【】o【rce who /will be your en\gi】/ne fo/r grow/th.”/Buy 【second】 hand\ supplies and th】ink about packagingHow exciting is it when yo】u】 start\ a ne【】w business t【】o 【go all out on the stationa/ry, fun new pens, plant pots, 】desk ch\intz and \fancy envelope【s? Right? B】ut all these things are sustaina\bi【lity nightmares. You 【know a【bo/ut fast fashion, but you also ne】ed to【 b/e awa\re of &ls】quo\;fast stationary’\./ Step away from the p/en\s - you’\ve /go】t lots at home already./A/nd that goes for /machines as\ \well as pens, adds Jason Dow\nes, MD at PowWowNow,】 &ldquo\;when businesses are sourcing /off】ice】 equipme】nt, the/y sho】ul\d s【eek appliances with \a】n ENERGY 】STAR label, which【 indica\tes that the equipment\ has achiev】ed ener/gy efficiency \sta【ndards set by the EU./ 】Computers, for example, us/e 30-65 percent les\s electricity, while there are also\ greener alternatives for a lo【t of t】echno】l\ogy, such as/ energy-【efficient l\i\ghtb\u】lbs or solar-pow\ered】 smart】 speakers.&】【rdquo/;】Ros【alind Rathou【se run】s a s】ustainable cookery \school.】 She says, “when setti】ng up/ the \office of your ne\w bus\iness or start-】up,\ don&\rsquo;t be tem/pted to buy everythin/g new/. 【\Recycle where you can, use Fo【\rest/\ Stew/a】rdship Cou】ncil produc【ts and/ choose s\ustainable energy provider】s. Incorporate 】sustainability processe【s from d\ay one an\d emphasise/ the im【portance of waste management and re】ducin/g plastic.”Think about y【our energy supplierBills【 aren’t the mo\st glamorou】s t】/】opic, but choose the right ene\rgy sup】plier; you could save money as well as the p\lanet. B/ruce Bratl\ey ex/plai\/ns, “there i【s a growing】 r】ange 【of fully renewable energy pro\viders that 】can /pow【er your busi】ness withou【t creatin】g 【/extra/ greenhouse】 gas emissions, and even green web【 hosti/ng companies with renew【abl/e energy a】nd carbon offsetting s】ch【emes. Bu【sinesses can\ sav/e resourc\es】 by ensu【ring th】at they're signed up to pa【perle【ss【 billing for all of t\h】eir bills.【 Devel/oping gre【en habits in the 【workplace is/ easy\ and ca\n have a \signi】fica【nt impa】ct, f\or exampl\e, m【akin/g sure lig\hts and screens aren't being left on】 needlessl/y, using publi\c transpor】t to】 /g】et to me\etings and making sure e【veryo\ne \has easy access to】 【recycling bin/s.”Th】ink\ abo【ut em【otiona\l susta【inability, tooOnce you】’ve done /all you can】 to be sustain\able with the pr【acti/cal things, you need to th】ink about your own mental well【being, to【o, /adds Bec Evans. “A\ lo\t of people set up side h【ustles because/ they 】are solving problems in【 some way a/nd I s】peak to【 a l\ot【 of peop\le in areas of health \and mental wellbeing who fee\l the pro】ble\ms 】/they see a/ren’t bein【g solved. /Talk to customers /and /ask/ them wh\at they think./ Be t\rue\ to your values. If sustain【ability is something that mo/tivat/es y】ou then it&\rsquo;s important to】 check y【ou’re in 】l】/i【ne with your 【/own va\lues.”W】ords:/ Jenny S【ta【llardShare/\ this article M【o/re from lif/eorM8

atKVMont Saint M】ichel\ recla/ims/ isl】a/nd-li【ke character \after year/s of major constru\ction4WKA

IXVJDub】ai acts to ste【m the 】ti【de of single use plastic4s52

1.vMWaText sizeAaA\a&/ldquo;/It’s \unfa【ir t\o say they are jumping 】on t】he ba/n/dw/\agon, 】natur【e documentaries have always \been motivate\d by conse\rvation.” 【Sa【t in his office at University Col】le/ge L/ondon, lec】ture【r in/ sci/ence communication, Dr Jean-Baptiste Gouyon\/ expla】ins to /me \how nature documentaries/ have come \full circle by\ embracing th\【eir roots in envi/ronmentalism.【 In the early days of TV【, he reveals, f\ilms a\bout/ animals\ helped】 to estab【lish th\is brand new medium【 as 【/a source】 of trustworthy informa/tio/n. Docum】enting and catalo【】guing biodiversi】t\y, they told 【timeless stories of 】creatures no\/t s【o dissimilar to u/s.“Befo【\re \Attenborough was Atten/borough, it w/as common to see scientists 【at work,” Gouy/on says, but things began t\o change】/ as the \century wore on. With the i】nc】\reasing doom and gloom of environmen/tal cris/is loo【min【g ov\er the general 【population, film【makers rejec【ted 】stories abou【t wh\at was】 reall】y h\appenin】g to 【th/e pla【net. “\The【re 】was a documented reluctanc【e to eng【age with envi【ronmental is】sues, they d】idn&rsqu\o;/t】 wa\nt to push audiences 】away.”D】avid Attenbo【rough \makes a spee】ch /at /a cerem】on】y f/or \t/he\ naming of the RRS Sir 【D】avid Atte【nboro\ughAsadour Guzelian/ASSO【CIATED 【PRES【\/SAsadour GuzelianDuring the【 1990s, however, things began to change. “A s【hift in the cultural context has happe】ned and t】here is more acceptance \that 【we are in a bad sit\uation.” Having been bombarded with years of ongoing【 catastrophe, pe/o/ple had becom【e too w//】ell informed to keep tolerating a\【 w】a】te\red-down /version of【 the t【ruth. It has beco/me imposs】ible to ignore /he】/ says, “the state of【 the】 \plane/t i【s wh/at /it i【s.&【rdquo;Now 】we&rs】【qu\o】;re hooked. 14.1 million people watched\ the BBC&/rsquo;s【 27 series, Blue Planet II mak\ing it the】 most-watch【ed 】T\V prog】\ramme in Britain that 】year, /a\ccordin\g to the BBC. Natural history】 persona】/\li】ties lik\e David Attenborough have 】bec/ome big 【stars, successfully\ transf】/orming from amateur ecologists to/ folk hero【es for those p】lagued by eco-anxiety. We have beg\un to recognis【\e the p【ower of /t\he e】nvironme/nt/al film and\ its potential make us \think a lot harder a/bout t/ackling proble/ms lik【e plasti】c pollution.Waste from wors】h【i//p: solvin\g Indi\a's unique river pollution p】【roblemWATCH | Shrink【ing pelican b/reeding grounds restored after BP\ 【oil spillSerbia will plant 1 billion tre】e\s\ in【 o【rder to reach net zero t\ar\get by 205【】0The 】power of movi/ng pictu【res“There is no doubt that film as a mediu】m has massive power to elicit/ an emotional rea\ct/ion,】&rdq】uo; says\ Gouyon\, “but there isn’t 】really any】 hard evidence to/ prove this yet.&r】dquo【; More s/o than the\ writt】en w【ord, these documentaries 】seem to pique our interest/ in the\ p/lanet and poten】\ti/ally even d】rive/ 】us to take action. A sur/\vey of U】K superm/arket/ shoppers found th【at 88】 per】ce\//nt o【f people【 who watc】hed Blue Plan】et II\ had \changed their behaviour \as a resul【t.After watching th\e \series\, Da\río Fern&aa\cute;ndez-Bellona, a postdoctoral rese【archer at Univers】ity College 】Cork, noticed th【at th/e programme w】as consistent/ly \tr\ending on twitte/r the evening】 it aire】d. He started to wonder just how much these\ 】docum【entaries are able to affect our behavio\ur. Using 3000M\apping /the 【Arctic\ sea life twee\ts and figu】res for v//isit/s to the Wiki/pedia 】pages 】of the animals f/eatured in【 the series, he a/nalysed this data to see what, i/f any\, /patter\ns of behav】iour were influenced by watching the show.His rese\】arc【h fo\und /that 【just 6 percent 【of th\e actual programme 【wa【s about envir【onmental issues a】nd/ a m/【er\e 1 【percent of tweets me/ntioned these t\o】pics.【 T\hese figur【e/s/ didn&rs/quo;t/ look promisi\n】g. Docu】mentar】i】es clearly a\ren/&rs】quo】;t/ usel/ess for conservation, howe/ver, as they \al\ter ou【r perception of wi\ldl【if】e in other 【ways. The Wikipedia pages for each of the【\ animals that appe\ared 】\in episodes of Blue Plane/t【 2 had an annual spike】 【/in visits imm【ediat【ely f】】ollowing the【 broadcast of/ the s【how. Ev\e/n this s/mall connection with nature could be enough to create 【an awa/ren/ess crucial to avoiding /【an exti/nction.One of the mos\t successful elem\en/ts of the moder\n nature】 docume/ntary is t\he &ld//quo;ma【king-of&r【dquo; segment. Usually a short section】】 s【eparate【 from the main show t】h\at reveals how/【 s【ome】 of the scenes we】】re shot, the “making-】of&】rdq【uo;\ le【ts us s【ee behind】 the \scenes【.【】 It a\lso helps to break dow/n the】【 i\nvisib【le wall bet/ween the viewer and t】h/e animal】s. “Films show /nat\ure with】out \humans,/ not \as somethi】ng t/o en】gag】e with,【&】rdquo; explains Dr Gouy】on, “【the cameraman can be a role model for ordinary people \and express more emot【ional responses.” It h/elps the audien/ce】, /usu】ally tuc】/ked a/way in their living room in increasing\ly u\rban\ised societies, to engage w\ith a world they hav/e bec】ome】 distant from.D/ocumenting the fut】u/】reEngagem【ent is un【do\u【\btedly the best /way to get us to\ care\ more ab/out the state of the planet. I【f we】/ want】 t\o mak【e film\s mor\e effective in the future, Gouyo】n 【【【s【ugges】ts, we nee/【d to encourage that en\gagement by giving the came【ras to local populations to document their own experience/s. &ld/q】uo;We can’t go by the impe】rialist model of Brito/n’s going\ and watching 】wil\dlife.”Portrayals of enviro】nmental i【ssu【/es can have【 different\ effect\s in diff\erent countr【ies.\UnsplashWe /respond 】far b/etter, \it seems, to films about environm【【ental issues that resonate /with our own \life \experie\n】ce\. \A good exa】/mple of this/ is】 the international re/sponse to the d【ocumentary T/he Co\ve.】 The 2009 Oscar Award/-win/ning piece about do\lphin hunting/ 】in Taiji, Japan cause【d indign/【ant outrag\e amon】g west】ern audien】ces. Its thriller-style tr/e【atment of ‘uncove/ring&【rsquo; the practice using spy-cams didn&/rsquo;t/, however, go down we】ll \with/ audiences in t/he \co/\untr【y【 wh】ere\ it was shot an【d many show【ings/ were met with protests.This k【ind of document/ary c/l/early raises a】wareness but\, with\i\n the communities a】ble to acti\vel/y change pr【actices har\mful to the en/vir\onment it rarely has the same impa】ct. Despite /already 】】having risen to astronomical levels o\f popularit】y, there【 is still a lot of scope for t】h\ese programm】es to do more 【fo/】r conservation. Choos【ing to cha】mpion l\oca/l voices co/uld spell the end for popular ec【o-h/eroes like David Attenborough, but it m【ight【 just 【be the kind of convincing many peop\l/e n【eed to take action on cl/i【ma【te change.Share th/\is article M\ore /from l】ifewsVh

2.VVUkHow/ is the【 UAE ta】ckling its food waste problem?【mGIn

3.Z2j3Finance going greenyTeh

4.RaRvT\ext sizeAaAaFr【【om food 【wast/e to/ woodchips, a wide sel【ec/tion of surprising 【raw material】s can end\ up s【erv/ing as an alternative to plastics. Th】ey can be biodegradable in/ just a few months or even c/ompostable as opposed】 to the synthe\tic plastics, which stays \with us fo\r sev【eral【【/ h】\undreds【 of years in 】the\ landfills and release\s a lo\ng list of toxic che【mi\cal【/s /into our env【iron\m/ent. Rec/ycling can help ease some of these proble/ms\, but th【e be】st solution seem\s to 【repla/ce t【hem with more eco-f】ri【endly m】aterials】.However, some bi】od/egradable plastic has already attracted critical rem\a【rks, such as the one made from hemp and/ co\rn starch 【a【mong ot/hers. There are debat/es that pro\ducin】g these can resu/lt in a】】n even /greater amount】 of pollutants】,【 due to the pro\d】uctio/n with fertilizer【s and pe【sticides as well as the chemical p/rocessing】 nee【ded to】 turn organic material int\o plastic./Living 【it m\ade a selection of【 some recent】\ innovation/】s, w/hich need no land 【and no pesti】cides t\o produce,/ 【as ma/inly usi【【ng what is given by nature.Fr【om seaw\eed to biod//egradable plasticLiv】ing it rep\orted 【earlier\ abo【ut researchers, who have devised a possible solution/ for dur\able plastic waste, 】i/nspired\ b\y the oce//an. Scienti【sts \at Tel Aviv Univ】ersity have created a biodegradabl】e plastic by cultivating natural polymers made by micro-organisms t/h】at feast on 】se【a【weed al\gae.Or【/ganic plastics f/ro/m avocado s\eedsAvocado seeds are a h/uge industrial /waste 【in Mexic】o, henc】e a lo\cal c【ompany/ came【 up\ 】wi【th th/\e idea of【】 giv【i\ng 【them a \/second life\ as biodegrad/ab/le plastic. Biofas】e today produces /avocad【o【 seed 】stra【ws a//nd cutler\ies. Accor/ding to th\em, as i/t is foo【d w】aste, it/ reduces the costs/, so\ th】ey claim that they\ can produ\ce it for th\e same pri】c\e as】 regula【r palstics.The precious material in l】o】bsters' exoskeletonS/he\llfish, such as lobste【rs, could o/ffe/r a solution to the scourge of si【ngle-use plastic thanks to a bio-polymer in their shells called chitin. 】A London/-based startup The Shellworks is developi【ng\ a met】hod to transform thi/s material -】 normall/y destine】d\ for the 】rubbish\ /\ti【p - 【into】 a novel bioplastic that/'【s\ both biode/grada】ble and recyclabl】e.Click on t【he video a】bove to learn h【ow l/o【bst/ers can provide an alternative \for single-use p\lastic.Share this\ article More from lifeswOD

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hWOfText sizeAaAaWalking】 along the shore of the Dead Sea give【\【s you a c\lear vision of how 【qui\/ckly【 na/ture \reacts to】 human intervention. The\ Dead S/ea h/as been dying for de\cades,\ and】 the result is \al/ready obv】ious.Nestled betwee】n Israel and the Palestinian T【erritories 】and /Jordan, /the Dead Sea has been le\aving its mark /【【on mankind since biblical times. Famous for its extreme sa】】linity, /an/ Israeli a】r/tist 【has even】 been i【nsp【ired by that and use t/he\ expanse as【 her stu】dio\ to create cry/stal art pi\eces.Since the histori【cal lake has be【en exploited by modern indus】try, the【 wate【r】 】level is【 g】radually lowering. T【he m【iner/al extraction and the diversio\n of the \Riv/er Jord【an&r\s】/quo;s/ water /have been\ big c/ontributors to the phenom】enon.】As the sp\ectacularly shrinki\ng wat\er level leaves it】s mar】k on the shore,\ d\angerous sinkholes appear al【ong the lake - the 】】result of \the br】iny wat/e\r r/ecedin/g unde【rgrou】nd. /In 199【0 th】e】re were a little 】over 100/ sinkholes, accordi\ng to the Geological/ Survey o\f Israel. Today the】re are more t/】h/an【 6,000. This led 【to the n】ecessary clo/【sure【\ of some s【hore seg【ments hence those tourist spots became ghost to】】wns.Click on th】e video above \to learn more ab】out what happens with the Dead/ S】【【ea.Share this【 article 】 More\ from plac/esHFU3

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EwZ4Text siz【eAaAaStar//ting】 a new business/ i\s an/】 exc【iting time, as you emb\ark on\ your entrepr】eneur【ial/ fut【ure w【ith passio【【n and/ dete】rminat【ion\. For many of u【s, n/ew ventures【 often have sust】ainability as a focus. Whether it/&rsqu【o;s【 a dr【ink, a/ clothing brand, jewellery or a café【;, many of us want commit 【to a sustainable ethos as part of our /brand. But what about our //own sustainable effort/s? After all, 】you can’t set up an eco-/focused b\rand and then n\ot pay attentio/n to the sustainabili】ty】 of your own 【working\ day. We asked experts f\or advice o/n how to be a susta】inable】 start-u\p【, from day o】ne\. Make your launch party and gifting\ susta】inablePl【anni】ng an event/ and 】gifts for customers to welco【m【e your n【ew \‘business/ baby&rsq\uo; into/ the【 world is all very well, but you n/eed to do it in 【an /eco-friendly way. Bec E/van】s is author of How to Have a Happy Hustle. She advises, “m】ove\ away fro/m bub【ble wrap envelopes, and th】ink about bi\odegradable \goody【 bag/s – and no glitter balloo/ns! 】/Think about【 plastic in gi/fts and plas\tic waste when giftin\g. It&r\squo;s a】bout showi【ng intention &nd\ash; when you set up a \business\ it’s abo\ut building a community \and workin\g w\ith ea【rly users. Think ‘do【es t【he wor/ld really n】ee/d this?’&rdq\uo;.R/ela】t【ed | 9 susta】inable economy startups a/【i】ming to\ cl【ean up o/ur future 【Make su】stainability\ a &ls】quo;/given’, not a &lsquo/;must】 do/’Jesse Tran and So\n Chu are fellow students from Vietnam who\ 】are s/tar】t】i\ng their own trainer bus】iness and their p】roducts are made f】rom recycle\d coffee cups. \Stu【dying】 in Finland, t【hey saw 】clear】 diffe/rences in 】the way thi】n\gs wer】e produced and /the/ sustaina\ble】 the way of life. The【y&rsq】uo;ve channelled /that into\ their【 brand, RENS. The pair started using an organic cott【on bu\t【 realised this would have/】【\ an environmental impact an】/d so switch】ed to a\ new fabric.\】 &l/dquo;As /millennia【ls, for 【us sustainability shou\ld be a given\,&rdquo/; sa/ys Jess/e. “We want t】o p【lay a 【role as ambassa/dor/s &nda】sh; it【&rs\quo;s /easier to liv【e a sust/ainable life in Finland!”/Rel】ated |The brands launching sunglasses mad/e fr\om human hair, milk bottles \a】nd coffee waste View this post on I\ns】ta【gramRens are【 best sh】ared with \frie【nds! #renshipA post shared by/ Rens Ori\gi【n\al (@rensoriginal) on Aug 19, 2\019 \at 9:0T】ext sizeAaA/aOne ma【n's t】ra/s\h is\ another\】 man's treasure/ - and some people 【build a house out of it. F\or example, thousands of glass bottles can make an ent】ire hous【e\ or chapel, such as Edou】/ard Arsenault's Bottle H\ouses in/ Cape/ Egmon/t, Pr\ince Edward /Island, Canada. He used 2】5,】000 mul【ticoloured bottles to erect t/hree buildings in 】the /'80s. Today it \is a must-see tou/\rist】 attraction.If ther/e is no glass, plastic \bottles can make /a very 【fi\ne alterna\tive. After losi\n【g her\ h【ouse in an earthqua/ke in El\ Salvador, 】87/-yea/r】-old Maria】 Pon】ce【 built a new\ home with \plastic bo/ttle【s, which 【she h【ad】 collecte/d throughou】t se/ven 】months from roadside trash.Maria Be【rsabe Po/nce, 87, st/【ands outsi】de he【r hou/s】e made out】 of \plast/ic\ bottles in the vi】llage of El Borbo】llonReuters/Jose CabezasWood,】 rocks and even an old bus can m\ake a very u】n【ique house,/ such as \the【】 one in Japan, /pho/tographe【d by Christoph Ru【pprecht, a geographer【 from Australia, according to who\】m, this quir/ky house【 \】was built e\【ntirely 】ou】t of discarded trash an\d recycled materials.House made entirely ou/t o\f recycled materials in JapanFlickr/Christoph Rupprecht】Unable\ to find 】【a【 suitab【le/ house,【】 Egyptian Ta/ymour 【El】-Had【idi 【made a big step toward【】s his dream of having/ an environ【mentally friendly home in 2012. /Four years】 /la\ter he【 moved int\o \a small castle【 in Cai【ro, w/here /all the walls, ceilings, windows and \even be【ds are ma【de of rec\ycled\】 material such as discarded concrete block】s, red bricks \a/nd glas/s bot【tles.If yo/u do not have concrete or d\iscarded bricks,】 a few thous/and g\l/a/ss bottles \can be of \h\elp. Si/ngle \mother Ivon【e Martins made a DIY home in \B\【r【azil using\ thousand】s of discarded bottle【s.Hit play the vid\eo a】bove to learn more about these homes m/】ade of garbage.Share thi【s a/rticle M】ore 【fr】om lifea\m P/DT【Think ab/out【 the entire prod/uction chainSo you&/r】squo;ve c/hosen your start-up./ Now to find】 a way to produce】 the 【product】. Sustaina\bility needs to be considered from start /to 【f\inish. Paul Turton i/s the Man】aging Dire】ct\or at Pact, a lead\ing speciality coffee s\erv】ice. He reveals that \they know customers are more likely/ to choo/se a brand or product that h】】【as【 purpose at the he\art of the business, so you should 【consider making this a k】ey /part of your company proposition.“S/ustainability is one 【of our\ core values, from t/he \farming wor】kfor/c】e in t\he co/untries/ w】【e buy our/ coffee/ from, to the /far/ming pra\ctices, ethics, shippin/g【, wa【/rehous】e【\s and roasting of the co】ffee,” he says. &l】dquo;It wouldn't be r】ig】ht to ask peop/le to work in 】a【 way that doesn't s】how us up】\holding our own standard/s - /no ma/tte/r the 【size of our busines\s.&rdqu\o;Jesse and【 Son fr\om Rens agree that their biggest tip【 is to 】find 【a g/ood/ sustainable base】. They work /from Aalto universit】y. &ldq】uo;Th【e lights are/ all aut/omat/ic, and\ everything is optimis/ed【/\,” sa】ys Jesse.Is your office space susta/i/nability-f【r】iendly?According to Bec Evans, “happiness is the j\ump】ing-off】 point【 【【for【 becoming a\ &lsq【uo;si】\d】e h/ustler’, and one of】 the reaso/ns si/de hus\tles are growing 】so 】much is \b】ecause you】 can work /from【 /anywhere\.” So\ that/&】rsquo;s a g】ood place to s\tart 【&n】dash; is yo】ur chosen place /of work】 sustaina】ble? Whether it’s at home】, a 【co/-w】ork/ing【 space o\r ren/【ted of\fic\e, y\ou need】 t\o c\onsider everything from the recycling p】\olicy to energ/y use.Susan Steven\s, /a CEO and Founder o【f/ 【M/a/de 【with R【espect ad/ds, “balancing between business objectives /and sus【tainability is ve【ry hard】 in the modern wo【】r【ld. \Our current【 business \model i/s b【ased \on con\】/sumerism, brands fighting for more an\d more】 sales, making customers buy thing【s they don【’t n【e】ed and have \t/【o th\row t【hem awa/y 】i/n a mon】\th or two.\ App】r\oxi\m】ately 1.3 bil\lion tons o/f 【wa【ste is 】prod】uced globally each year, this numb【er is ex【pected to increase to 2.2 billion tons p/\e/【r year by 2025】. This is alarming.”R】elated /| 5 s】tunning examples/ of/ g\reen architecture around the worldCommit to /recyclingThis may f\ee\l li\k\e /a more obvious one,\ but recycling can get forgotten 【when \you&rsquo/;re wonderi/ng abo【ut the provenance of the /cotton for those new bags you’re mak【ing\. Keep/ a kee【n eye on the re\cycling \opt】ions at your wor【kplace and of your prod\uct, expert【s sa】y. Paul Tur】to\n/ adds, &ld【quo\;it&rs】quo;s good 【to get into good /habits fr【om t/he start, then when the busi\ness/ gro】ws, it’s already ingrained in t】he cult/ure/. People don&r\squo;t o\ften r】ealise【 you can 】even \recycle used coffee grounds, it’\s best\【\ to seek out/ sup/pli【er/s【 who 】can help you do this, we use First Mile\ Rec【\ycling】 a\n【d Bio-Bean 【or simply \get a compost【 bin in the o【ffice.&r/dq/uo;First Mile founder】 and CE\O, Br】uce Bratley, adds, “when it 【com】es to recycling, it【's【 i】mport\ant to remember that no【t all was【te companies deal wit\h wa】ste in the same w【ay. 】It'\s essent【ial t\o ide\nt/ify one tha\t will\ continue you】r sustainabi\li【ty effo】rts aft【er you/r waste leaves yo\ur pr】emises to 【avoid it ending up in landfill sites where it will pr【o【duce green】h【ouses gases, such as metha】ne.”\Fi【】nd people who】 are on the sa\me sustainab】ility /page as \you\Wo/\rking with like-minded peop【le will mean y【ou】 develop \a st】rong sustain】ability】 mantra across the d\ay and into the future. David Ke】lly, Gener\al Manager \for \Eu【rope, Middle East and】 Africa a【t Deputy】, a co【mpa】\ny /that w\orks with】 lots of start-ups, s\ays, &\ldquo;to grow/ sustainably and /re/tain talent, you need/ to b】rin\g people on the j】ou/r/ney with you.】 Pay th/em pro【perly a【nd\ on time and prove wor】k w/il/l fit into their\ lif【e. In/ve\sting【 in tools that allow you to /d】o【 thi】s wi\l【l bu】ild 【trust amongst a dedicated work【f【】o【rce who /will be your en\gi】/ne fo/r grow/th.”/Buy 【second】 hand\ supplies and th】ink about packagingHow exciting is it when yo】u】 start\ a ne【】w business t【】o 【go all out on the stationa/ry, fun new pens, plant pots, 】desk ch\intz and \fancy envelope【s? Right? B】ut all these things are sustaina\bi【lity nightmares. You 【know a【bo/ut fast fashion, but you also ne】ed to【 b/e awa\re of &ls】quo\;fast stationary’\./ Step away from the p/en\s - you’\ve /go】t lots at home already./A/nd that goes for /machines as\ \well as pens, adds Jason Dow\nes, MD at PowWowNow,】 &ldquo\;when businesses are sourcing /off】ice】 equipme】nt, the/y sho】ul\d s【eek appliances with \a】n ENERGY 】STAR label, which【 indica\tes that the equipment\ has achiev】ed ener/gy efficiency \sta【ndards set by the EU./ 】Computers, for example, us/e 30-65 percent les\s electricity, while there are also\ greener alternatives for a lo【t of t】echno】l\ogy, such as/ energy-【efficient l\i\ghtb\u】lbs or solar-pow\ered】 smart】 speakers.&】【rdquo/;】Ros【alind Rathou【se run】s a s】ustainable cookery \school.】 She says, “when setti】ng up/ the \office of your ne\w bus\iness or start-】up,\ don&\rsquo;t be tem/pted to buy everythin/g new/. 【\Recycle where you can, use Fo【\rest/\ Stew/a】rdship Cou】ncil produc【ts and/ choose s\ustainable energy provider】s. Incorporate 】sustainability processe【s from d\ay one an\d emphasise/ the im【portance of waste management and re】ducin/g plastic.”Think about y【our energy supplierBills【 aren’t the mo\st glamorou】s t】/】opic, but choose the right ene\rgy sup】plier; you could save money as well as the p\lanet. B/ruce Bratl\ey ex/plai\/ns, “there i【s a growing】 r】ange 【of fully renewable energy pro\viders that 】can /pow【er your busi】ness withou【t creatin】g 【/extra/ greenhouse】 gas emissions, and even green web【 hosti/ng companies with renew【abl/e energy a】nd carbon offsetting s】ch【emes. Bu【sinesses can\ sav/e resourc\es】 by ensu【ring th】at they're signed up to pa【perle【ss【 billing for all of t\h】eir bills.【 Devel/oping gre【en habits in the 【workplace is/ easy\ and ca\n have a \signi】fica【nt impa】ct, f\or exampl\e, m【akin/g sure lig\hts and screens aren't being left on】 needlessl/y, using publi\c transpor】t to】 /g】et to me\etings and making sure e【veryo\ne \has easy access to】 【recycling bin/s.”Th】ink\ abo【ut em【otiona\l susta【inability, tooOnce you】’ve done /all you can】 to be sustain\able with the pr【acti/cal things, you need to th】ink about your own mental well【being, to【o, /adds Bec Evans. “A\ lo\t of people set up side h【ustles because/ they 】are solving problems in【 some way a/nd I s】peak to【 a l\ot【 of peop\le in areas of health \and mental wellbeing who fee\l the pro】ble\ms 】/they see a/ren’t bein【g solved. /Talk to customers /and /ask/ them wh\at they think./ Be t\rue\ to your values. If sustain【ability is something that mo/tivat/es y】ou then it&\rsquo;s important to】 check y【ou’re in 】l】/i【ne with your 【/own va\lues.”W】ords:/ Jenny S【ta【llardShare/\ this article M【o/re from lif/eqh8c

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w5y1Do e【nvironmental documentaries actually have an impac【t on p【eople’s bad】 ha/bits?Lbpy

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87电子技术Yu

9nIWAl\uis/io Sa/m\pa】io Dos Santos i【n Braz/il, Nixo】n Mutis in Colombia】, Ag\udo// Quill【io in the Philip】pines, Rah\】mat Hakimin/ia in Iran.These a【re s【ome of t】he 164 peopl\e /who los/t th/eir lives for d【e\fe\ndi/ng the environ】ment f】ro\m 'menacing industries' in 2018, said a human rights NGO\.That’s【\ mo\re than three people murdered on average ea】\ch 】week, according to a new \repor【t by UK-based Global Witness rele\ased on【 T/uesday.The 】P】h【ilippi/nes had【 the hig\hest number of\/ /kill/ings o\f any count【ry with at leas【t 30 environment d\efe/nders m/\urdered i【n【/ 2018. This is th】e fir【/st time the\ Asian Pac/ific country is at the t\op 】/of\ the lis】/t\ since the NGO reporting such deaths in 2012.Guatemala\ /recor】ded the sharp\e【st ri【se in murders, which【 jumped more than five-fold — m/aking it】 the deadl【/iest 】country pe】r capita.Europe continues to】 be the less af】fected contine\nt with only three \repor【ted deat】hs/, all of them in 】Uk\raine.Increase in killings relat\ed to conflicts over wat\erIn the【 /9 \cou/ntri【es \surveyed, m】ining was linked to 43 】deaths\. Attacks i\n the ag【/ribusiness sect【or were the se/cond cause of d】eat【h (21 \murders). There was a/ four-fold incr/ease in k【illings related to conflicts over/ w\ater/ in 2018 (17/ \murd/ers)/, underli】ning/ the dead\ly cons\eque】nces of warmer tempera/tures, erratic ra】infall【 and【 d/\iminishing groundwater, parti【cularly i】n Latin A】mer/ica, Africa and South】 Asia】, said the report.The a/tt\acks were connected to\ opposition to/ proliferating hydropower projects, as\ well as corruption in the management of local wa/ter 【sources, Alice Harrison, a ca/mpaigner at【【 Global W】itness, told the Th【oms\on Re/ute】rs Foundation."With climate【 b\rea\kdown and in/creasing【 dro/ught, it is【 hi\】ghly likely that \we'll be【gin to see a 【【rise in co】nflicts over water sources involving 】【w【hoever controls them," s/he added【.Duterte'】s reign\ of terrorHarrison poi/nted ou/t that muc【h of t\he persecution of land defenders was driv/en by the 【demand for land a\nd 】raw materials found in everyda【y prod/ucts, "from fo\od to mobile phones, to jewel【le【ry"."This tr【end on\ly/ \looks 】set to wor【sen as strongmen poli【ticians around the w【o【r\ld【 are stripping away environmental and human r/ights protections to pr】o】mo】te busi/nes】s at any cost," 【she said in a stat【ement.N【earl\y 300 farmers, indigenous people and human r/i【g\hts a\ctivists hav【e\ b】【een kill\e【d si【nce Philippine P\resident 】】【Rodrigo Duterte took o】ff/ice in 2016, accor【ding to Philippine human righ\ts group】s.“The Duterte re/gime/'s inte【nsified militarisation of communit/ies has had cata】s【t/rophic effects," said\ Cristina】【 Palabay,【 secr】】【e\tary-general of lan】【d \right\s group\ Kar【apatan."The exp/anded【 power /given to the police】 a/nd 】the m】】【ilitary has \suppr/essed diss【ent and promoted threa/ts, h/arassment and /attacks a/ga\inst acti\vists a/nd】 human rights defende【rs," sh\e said.Intimidat【i】on of environmental defenders on the riseWhi\le there were fewer deaths re】ported than i】n 2017 (207 in /17) Global Wi【tness also reco/rded the i【\ncreasing use of 【lawsuits, a\rrests/, and\ /death threat【s to【 intimid】ate 【ac】tivists 】】even in develo】ped countries.The\ re】port 【takes t/he\ case of Iran where environmental defe/nders are cons【idere【d to be】 te【/rrorist/s \or 【enemies/ of the state, citing t\he case】 of nine \activists i\mpr】isoned on spyi\ng\ cha/rges.Global Witness also note】d the \repression of anti-fracki\ng protests in the UK】\】 by \changing so\me national laws to ban cer\ta\/in demonstrations.The \NGO called out the rol】e of investors — li】ke development 【banks — play in facilitating the violati】on of\ activis\ts' rights to protest.S\ha】re this articleShareTweetSharesendShareTweetShare【send/MoreHide【ShareS】【e/n//dShareShareShareSendShareSh\ar\eYou m\igh/\t also like / 【 \ Watc【\h: Farmers create 【natural straw intend to break plastic�】39;s back \ \ / 【 / 】 EU's youngest com】m【issi\o/ner on how to turn cli/mate crisis around 【 / / / \ 】 】 'Inc【redible win for n】ature】9;: Plans】 to drill in Great/ Australi【an Bight abandoned 】 】 More aboutE/nviro【nme【ntEnvironmental pr】ot\ectionEnvironme】ntal \i/ssues \ \ B【row\se today�/39;s tagseFXr

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tsLRTe】xt s/izeAaAaWith a vie【【w to r\】ai\se awareness of the damaging i】mpact of carbon emissions produced from fly【ing, the UK are planning to introduce a tax to of【fset【 emissions. This &lsqu/o;carbo【n\ charge’ added to flight/ ticket pr【/\ices would/ fund eco-f/riend】ly pro/jects, like p】lanting\ t】rees to red/uce【 CO2 levels in o【ur/ a【tmosphe/re./ T】his sche】me would hopefully /encourage air passengers【 t】o fly le】\s/s】 frequently and to be aware o\f the ef/fect/ of t】ransport emis】】sions/ on th/e planet. But, do we ne/ed to【 f/ly【 to /a new destination to have an enric/hing summer holiday? \Can we have a real brea】k【 f【rom daily 【/life and n/ot \fly to a faraway de\stination? We【 /believe\ you abso/lutely】【 can and the】 /holi【day of d//r【e/ams you're lo\oking for, ma】y 【just be waiting for you in t/he countryside.The menta/l h】\ealth charity Mind state tha】t, &l】【/dq\u】o;spending ti【me in green spaces or bringing nature into your everyday life can】 benefit both your menta【l and 】/physical we/ll【being&rdquo/;, /so how can/ you have flying free ho【liday that prov\id】es you with all the benefits of being a\ro/und natur】e in the countrysi\de?Tran\sp/ortWhat are the no-fly alternatives?You/ may just gain a lot from the increasingly/ popular conce】pt of slow 【travel an】d f/eel a sense of joy as you 【me/ande】r through sites /【of natura\l beauty】 t【o y【our 【destin【ation.You could always 】sail the seas \on a ferry t】o\ ne】arby 【countries like Fran】ce, Irel】and a\nd \】Holl\and if the idea of a staycation doesn&rs\quo;t float your boat... To get \/to those tra】nqui【l\ spots\ where you can immerse yourself in nature【 why 】not\ rent a【/ \camper va\n wit】h Yescapa if 【you&【rsquo;re not a car owner. Cr\uising on a v\a【n trip would not on/l\y a】llow you t\o take all your home/ comforts w】ith you】/, but it \would a【lso give you 【the freedom to travel far a【n\d wide, without the 】need to fly of course【.A【 cam\per【 vanThe famous Inter/rail Pas】s gives y】ou th】e liberty to tra\vel to 31 differ/ent European countrie/s/, all of which a/re\ home to na\tural beaut/y. What to do onc/e y\ou arrive at the station【? Tra【velling from the s】tation to yo【ur countryside \de/stination could be arrange】d 【usin【g the car 】s【haring App BlaBla Car whic\h has been tried and tested. You 【might make some frien\ds and you won't h\ave the probl】em o\f park/ing the car. Any\ 】of t】hese/ options/ wi】ll hel/p to calm any eco-anx】iety that /you may be feeling. W】hat to【 d\oReconnect with natureA study has proven that any form of immersion in the natural world heighte】ns you\r overal/l we\ll-being and s/timulates you to have a more po/s【i】tive inter\ac】tion】/ with the /w【ider human com】/mun/i】ty. In【 light of th【i】s, many are p】ra\isin】g/ th\e Japanes/e p【ractice of \Fore】st Bathin】g. No,/ \this does not me/an taking a bath in 【between the trees. T/his ancient/ proces【s of relaxation involves】 qu】ietly】/ o\bserving nature, pl】acing yo\urself 【in proximity【 with the\ tr\ee\s/ and breathing deeply. I/f y/ou’re\ looking fo/r a range\ of forests in the UK c】ountryside, F【ore/stry E【ngland provides a searc【h engin\e so y】ou can fi\n/d t【he woods clo【s\e to\ you.A woodlandReconnecting wit【h natur】e can also be done th【rough/ a\ctivit/ies \like ou/tdoor yoga/, walking, wild sw/imming, cycling, wild 【swimming, I could go on.W\hat t\o takeRent a fa】ncy bell te】ntNot staying in】 a cotta】g/e 【or eco-lodg/e? 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De【\tte kittet inneho】lde【r 【Spo【rk, gaffe【l/, skje, /kni】v, spi【se【pinn】er,/ sugerør og rengjørings/børste til】 sugerør. Lag/et //【av &os】lash;ko【logisk bambus og op/pbevart i】 en tøypose av &oslas【h;kologisk b】omull ? Mindre \avfal【l i hver【】】dagen】.【 Ja takk ?A post【 /shared b【【y bam【【bu® (\@b/ambuliving) on M【ay 15, 2019 at 2:34pm【 PDTTak\e food aw/ay wi】th youTaking 【food a\【way is a great way to /【prepare for your p/otentially isolated trip to/ the countrysid\e. So why no\t wr】ap /your food 【in\ c【ling film? Well, a\ccord】ing \to BeeBee 【‘more \than 1.2 bil】lion metres, equating \to 745,000 mi【les\ of【 cling fi【lm is used by ho】useho】lds a】cross Britain ev】ery year\&【rsquo;. Be】eswax wrap/s are a【 muc】h more su\stainable alt】\ernative to prolonging the life o【//f 【your foo】d. V/iew this post on Instagr/am\Happ\y /】Spring Equi【nox! ?? Al fresco eat【ing is 【wi】thin reac】h again! 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5L天津电动汽车6S

JCQV】Du\bai an/d the United Arab Emir/a】tes are making anima\l con/se】\rvation a government priority at a time /when b】iodiversit\【y is unde】r threa\/t /and more anima】l】s fa【ce\ extinction globa/】l/ly.A re】port by the United Nations\ earlier this/ year claim\ed animal extinctio】ns are at an unpr/eced【en【t/ed high. Acco】rding【 to t\he organi】sa】ti\on, as many as one \m/illi【on species are under threat.On a visi\t to t【he 】desert, you/ 】might expect to f】ind ca/mels or】 antelope】, 【m】aybe \some /hawks.\ But Du】ba】i&rs\qu\o;s A】l Marmoom【 animal sanctuary 【】is/ teeming with 】biodiversi【ty with hundreds of differ【ent /species of】 birds, m【a/mmals, and rept【iles】.T【he sa/nctuary covers 20 percent of t】he whole area o/f Dubai. In the begin】ning, 】it\ was a desert popula\ted b/y nati\ve a【nimals, bu\t as the san\ctuar\y【 exp/anded \t】o m\ore than 50 oases, it was discovered/ these water bodi\es/ could cont【rol the environment【al b\alan/c\e.The sa\nctuary has even man】a/ged\ to at】tr【act the Arabian O】ryx. Thi】\【s an】i\mal w【as declared exti/n【ct in t【he w/ild in 1972, but has now been br】ought back from the\ b\r【ink by the reserve.Saoud F\aisal is a wildlife o\ffi/cer \at the】 Al Marmoom sanctuary. He says in the 80s an/d 90s the Oryx /wer】e o【verh\unted for food. Now t】he animal】 is cons\i【dered part o\f the r\egion's wildlife/】.&ld/quo;They are to/tally protected now/ an【d also they are he【althy,” he【 explains. “We have them in【 large numbers whic】h last year reached【 more tha【/n 500."From deser【t 【oases to in\door tropical environments, recent laws in Dubai mean gre/ater g】ove】rnment【al support for animal sanc/tuaries.Laws were introduced in 2007 to cover 【anima\l welfar\e, but awa【reness r】e/ally s】tart\ed\/ to build in 2016/. The laws /also apply to \rare and exotic animals.\ Some are /looked aft\】er in anim/al sanct/uaries like Green Pla/net.Everything about Gree【n Plane】t w】as de/si/gned specifically to 【create 】the ideal habitat for tropical 】p【lants】 a】nd a【n/imals in】 t】he mid】dle of the D】ubai de【ser【t】.The sanctuary house\s a wid【e range o【f /spe/cies including many diffe/rent birds, and ma\mmals such as two-toed】 slo\ths. And lizards l】ike gree/n/ iguanas or basi\lisks.The latest】 addition t/o /the Gree\n P】lanet family is a male Slow Loris /named/ Lo】nely by staff. But t【his wide- eyed, rare pr】imat\e wasn&【rsquo;t【】 lon】ely fo】\r long.As【 he is a critica/lly e】ndangered animal, the search was on to fin/d 【him a compan\ion, \A couple /of months later, a /female【 Slow Loris of the 【【same】 specie【s was also res/cued. These animals【\ mate for 【lif【e 【and\ af/ter they wer/】e int/roduced to each 【oth【e/r【 a【ppea【red to 】get along w/e】ll,【 】raising/ hopes there may 】be a baby Slow\ Loris/ in the near fut\ure.Sh\ar\e this articleCopy/paste the article 【vi】deo 【embed link below:CopyShar/eT\weetShares/e/ndShareTweetS】ha】resendMoreHi/deShareSe【ndSh】areShareShareSe/n【dShareShareYou might also【 like\ 【 【 The appeti/te for local sustainable 】food【 /produce in the Un】/ited Arab Emirates 【 【 】 / / \ \ Dubai acts t】o ste/m the tide of single use pl【astic \ \ 】 【 \ New era 】for Benidor\m as resort embraces sustainabi/lity / /】 / Mor【e aboutEnvir/onment/al prot【ecti/o\nFa\una and FloraD】ubai United Arab Emirates Most viewed Beijing is their cam【\pu/s/: Inside the 【Ch\/in\ese capita【l’s li/fe-c】hanging/ study tour】s \ 【 】 【 \ 9/ places to vi/sit on your cul\tural trip around\ Croatia / 】 The Palm Jumeirah: Dubai's sy【mbol of creati【vit】\/y and ambition 】 Marke【ts,/ coffee an/d stre\/e】t art: d【i\scovering Zagreb's secret delights 】 / Gr【eek is】lands of history and culture 】 \ 】【 Browse/ today's tags1JmW

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